Welfare

5.8 Million Individuals Drop Off Food Stamps Under Trump

Over 5.8 million individuals have discontinued their participation in America’s food stamp program since President Donald Trump’s first full month in office, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) data. The most recent USDA data shows that 5,829,890 people discontinued their participation in food stamps received through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) since February 2017, Trump’s first full month in office. Overall food stamp participation had consistently declined since 2013 back when the Obama administration was in power and enrollment in the program reached its peak in U.S. history. After 2013, SNAP enrollment plummeted once state legislatures passed laws requiring food stamp recipients to work, attend school, volunteer, or participate in job training for a set number of hours per week to receive benefits. Currently, there are 36,302,402 people enrolled in the nation’s food stamp program. But USDA officials say that number is “preliminary” due to the government shutdown at the end of 2018, which affected how food stamps were administered in early 2019. The president has signaled that he wants to curb the nation’s dependency on food stamps and wants those coming into the country to be self-sufficient.

Agreed!!  This is more great economic news that the dominantly liberal mainstream media isn’t reporting.  Excellent!!     🙂

President Trump Signs Order Cracking Down on Welfare-Dependent Legal Immigration

President Trump signed a presidential memorandum on Thursday cracking down on welfare-dependent legal immigration to the United States in an effort to protect American taxpayers. The order signed by Trump will enforce existing 1996 laws known as the “Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act” and “Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act” which were signed by then-President Bill Clinton. The order ensures that federal agencies will enforce the existing 1996 laws which seek to save American taxpayers by having their public welfare funding benefits reimbursed when they are used by a legal immigrant. The first function of the order mandates that a family member or business sponsor of a legal immigrant looking to permanently resettle in the U.S. is responsible for paying back the welfare costs previously used by that immigrant. For example, if a visa holder has used $10,000 in food stamp benefits while living in the U.S., when a family member sponsors them for a green card, that family member will be notified of the legal immigrant’s welfare costs to taxpayers and obligated to pay back the amount. If the sponsor of a legal immigrant does not pay the welfare cost, the Treasury Offset Program will take the money out of the sponsor’s taxes for that year. Federal officials said implementation of this order would begin in September. A senior administration official told Breitbart News that the order to enforce Clinton’s 1996 law will drive down welfare-dependent legal immigration to the U.S. which has cost American taxpayers billions over the years. “This is a historic, transformative action to restore the foundational principle of U.S. immigration law: that those seeking to join our society must support themselves financially,” the official said. “This executive action will dramatically curb ‘welfare tourism’ and protect U.S. benefits for U.S. families,” the official continued. “It will also ensure that immigrant sponsors cannot continue the practice of bringing in large numbers of welfare-dependent immigrants: because they will be financially liable. Congress passed these laws – but they were effectively never used. Now they will be.” The second function of the order ensures that the income a sponsor to a legal immigrant is taken into consideration when a legal immigrant is applying for federal welfare. Currently, only the income of legal immigrants is considered by federal agencies when the national is applying for public benefits. Under the rules set out by Clinton’s 1996 law, the Trump administration will make certain that the income of both the legal immigrant and their sponsor is considered when applying for benefits. “Newcomers will not be able to live on free federal healthcare, housing, and other welfare at taxpayer expense,” the senior official said. A senior administration official said Trump’s order also will help prevent illegal aliens from obtaining federal welfare benefits.

Excellent!!  And really, this is only putting teeth into welform reform legislation that then-President Bill Clinton (D) signed into law back in the ’90s, but it’s never seriously been enforced.  So, the Dems and liberal media will be hard-pressed to beat up on Trump over this.  But, hey..  If they do, and didn’t say anything at the time Clinton signed it into law, then they’re brazen hypocrites.     🙂

Weekly Jobless Claims Fell by More Than Expected As Trade War Escalated

The number of Americans filing applications for new unemployment benefits plunged lower last week even as trade tensions between the U.S. and China escalated. New claims for state unemployment benefits declined by 16,000 to a seasonally adjusted 212,000 for the week ended May 11, the Labor Department said on Thursday. Initial jobless claims are a proxy for layoffs. The low number of claims suggests that rising tariffs and retaliation by China have not hurt American workers. Claims were expected to decline to 219,000 from the elevated levels seen in the prior three weeks. The four-week moving average of initial claims, which smoothes out week-to-week volatility and is looked at as a more reliable measure of the labor market, rose 4,750 to 225,000 last week. Continuing claims, which are announced with a week delay, fell 28,000 to 1.66 million for the week ended May 4. The four-week moving average of ticked up 1,500 to 1.67 million.

Food Stamp Usage Falls to 37 Million for First Time Since October 2009

Overall participation in America’s food stamp program fell to 37 million for the first time since October 2009, according to the latest statistics released by the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The most recent USDA data revealed that 37,911,631 people received food stamps through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) in December 2018, marking the lowest level of overall participation in the nation’s food stamp program in nearly ten years. The last time overall participation in food stamps reached this level was in October 2009, when 37,672,818 people were on the government dole, according to USDA data. Overall food stamp participation had consistently declined since 2013, when the Obama administration was in power and enrollment in the program reached its highest levels in American history. After 2013, SNAP enrollment plummeted once state legislatures passed laws requiring food stamp recipients to work, attend school, volunteer, or participate in job training for a set number of hours per week to receive benefits. Food stamp enrollment dropped even further under President Trump’s administration partly because of the administration’s efforts to reform welfare programs like SNAP at federal and state levels of government and an improving economy spurred by Trump’s tax reform package. According to the latest USDA data, 4.2 million Americans have dropped off of the food stamp rolls during Trump’s presidency. President Trump also signaled that he is looking to limit dependency on welfare programs like food stamps even further.

Great news!!     🙂

Food Stamp Enrollment Drops in 47 States

Food stamp enrollment dropped over the past year in 47 out of 50 states, according to the latest U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) statistics on nationwide food stamp enrollment. The majority of states saw declines in the number of people enrolling in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) — the federal government program which administers food stamps — over the past year, with 47 states reporting a decline in enrollment between September 2017 and September 2018, according to the most recent USDA data. Some states even reported double-digit drops in food stamp enrollment. Food stamp enrollment went down the most in Texas, where 32.2 percent of food stamp recipients dropped out of the welfare program. North Carolina took second place, with 18.9 percent of residents opting out of food stamps, and Alaska took third with 15.2 percent of residents discontinuing their participation in the program. Only two states reported slight increases in enrollment during this time frame. Kansas reported a 3.2 percent increase in residents participating in SNAP, and Colorado reported a 1.6 increase in food stamp usage, according to the data. The third state, Rhode Island, did not report its data to the USDA’s Food and Nutrition Service (FNS) because it has been experiencing issues reporting data on state-level food stamp participation since February 2017. Nationwide, food stamp usage has been on a steady decline because of welfare reforms implemented at the state level over the past few years. According to the latest USDA data, 3.5 million Americans discontinued their participation in SNAP since President Donald Trump’s first full month in office. It is unclear whether enrollment in the nation’s food stamp program will continue its steady decline from 2013 onward with the relaxed provisions on welfare reform in the 2018 Farm Bill which recently passed Congress. The bill is headed to Trump’s desk, where he is expected to approve the measure even though he had urged the Senate to pass the work requirements provision and other welfare reform measures in August.

So, shame on Congress for NOT passing that provision.  But, for now..  This is more great  news in this Trump economy!!    🙂

Food Stamp Participation Reaches Lowest Level in Nearly a Decade

Participation in the nation’s food stamp program has sunk to an all-time low, reaching its lowest level in nearly a decade, according to the latest data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). The most recent USDA data reveals that 38,845,997 Americans took part in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), the federal government program responsible for administering food stamps, in August 2018. The last time American participation in the food stamp program dipped this low was nine years ago, when 38,184,306 Americans received food stamps, according to the data. The most up-to-date numbers also show enrollment in food stamps has declined for ten straight months. Using the latest data from the USDA, click here to see the month-by-month breakdown of how many people canceled their SNAP benefits in fiscal year (FY) 2018:

Great news!!     🙂

52.1% of Kids Live in Households Getting Means-Tested Government Assistance

Will they be called The Welfare Generation? Today, they are Americans under 18 years of age growing up in a country where the majority of their peers live in households that take “means-tested assistance” from the government. In 2016, according to the most recent data from the Census Bureau, there were approximately 73,586,000 people under 18 in the United States, and 38,365,000 of them — or 52.1 percent — resided in households in which one or more persons received benefits from a means-tested government program. These included the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (food stamps), Medicaid, public housing, Supplemental Security Income, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, Temporary Assistance for Needy Families and the National School Lunch Program. The Census Bureau published its data on the number and percentage of persons living in households that received means-tested government assistance in its Current Population Survey Detailed Tables for Poverty. Table POV-26 indicates there were approximately 319,911,000 people in the United States in 2016. Of these, 114,793,000 — 35.9 percent — lived “in a household that received means-tested assistance.” That does not mean every person in the household received the aid themselves, only that one or more persons living in the household did. When examined by age bracket, persons under 18 were the most likely to live in a household receiving means-tested government assistance (52.1 percent), while those 75 and older were least likely (18.8 percent). But Americans in all the age brackets up to age 44 analyzed by the Census Bureau were more likely to be living in a household that received means-tested government assistance than the overall national rate of 35.9 percent. For those 18 to 24 years old, the rate was 40.1 percent; for those 25 to 34, it was 36.8 percent; and for those 35 to 44, it was 37.4 percent. For those 45 to 54, it dropped down to 30.6 percent — below the 35.9 percent overall rate. But even when the Census Bureau excluded the school lunch program from its calculations, the percentage of those under 18 who lived in a household receiving means-tested assistance (44.8 percent) exceeded the percentage in any other age bracket. Twenty years ago, in 1998, according to Census Bureau data, only 36.9 percent of Americans under 18 lived in a household receiving means-tested government assistance. In 2008, the percentage broke 40 percent for the first time. In 2013, it broke 50 percent for the first time.

And it’s getting worse..  For more, click on the text above.