War on Christmas

Opinion/Analysis: The War on Christmas

In the opening sequence of Scrooged — which Sonny Bunch correctly identifies as one of the great Christmas movies of the modern age — we’re teased with the trailer for a movie called The Night the Reindeer Died. In this fictional made-for-TV movie, Santa’s workshop is attacked by machine-gun-wielding terrorists. Amid heavy artillery fire, Mrs. Claus races to the gun locker to hand out heavy weapons to the elves. Suddenly, Lee Majors, the Six Million Dollar Man (that’s $32 million in today’s dollars), rides up on a snowmobile. As the bullets fly, Majors asks Santa, “Is there a back way out of this place?” Kris Kringle responds, “Of course there is, Lee, but this is one Santa who’s going out the front door.” Majors nods silently in admiration of Santa’s grit. But he warns St. Nick, “Look, it don’t matter a hill of beans what happens to me, but the world couldn’t afford it if anything happened to you. Now you stay put.” “Aw, that’s very nice of you, Lee,” Santa says gratefully. He then adds, “And, Lee, you’re being a real good boy this year.” Majors then sets off on his death-dealing way to vanquish the enemies of Yuletide. “Eat this,” he grunts as he mows down the Santa-sacking psychos with his modernized hand-held Gatling gun. Now that’s my kind of war on Christmas. Alas, today’s “war on Christmas,” which has become for cable news an annual ritual, is merely another one of those metaphorical wars, like the wars on women, poverty, cancer, global warming, history, energy, religion, and science. (I’m sure I’m leaving a few dozen out.) Of course “metaphorical” doesn’t mean “fictional.” The “war” on poverty is — or was — a real thing; it just wasn’t a war. And yet the metaphorical wars have the capacity to elicit as much outrage as actual wars. For instance, in the Middle East and ever-growing swaths of Africa, there are nonmetaphorical wars on women, Christians, Jews, science, history, and gays. These wars have all the hallmarks of actual war, what with the killing, rape, and slavery. But in the United States the “war” on women that arouses so much passion from politicians and liberal activists should really be put in air quotes. Ditto the “war” on Christmas. Of course, the Left has always loved its metaphorical wars, ever since William James announced the pressing need for the “moral equivalent” of war. President Obama has kept that tradition alive, routinely calling for warlike unity in his effort to pour money down any number of rat holes. But the moment when the tail-chasing dog ate himself came when Obama declared a lexicological war on war, changing the “war on terror” to “overseas contingency operations.” Terrorist attacks became “man-caused disasters,” and American reprisals were euphemized as “kinetic military operations.” It was, to borrow a phrase, a metaphorical war to end all literal wars. We’ll know that battle has been won when we start talking about the Domestic Contingency Operation against Christmas. The merits of these metaphorical wars vary widely. War on cancer? Worth fighting. War on science? Mostly a bogus PR campaign to bully conservatives into silence. But the war on Christmas represents a special kind of passive-aggressive jackassery because the aggressors deny they have declared a war. They simply take offense at Christmas cheer. They cancel Christmas pageants. They leave baby Jesus in a cardboard box in the church basement, but see nothing wrong with celebrating the Winter Solstice as if that’s a more rational thing to do. And then, when people complain about this undeclared war on Christmas, the aggressors mock and ridicule them for paranoia and hyperbole. Since we’re comparing things to actual wars, it’s a bit like Vladimir Putin’s mischief in the Ukraine. He sends troops across the border, then denies they’re Russian soldiers. The soldiers kill Ukrainians, but Russian TV floats the idea it’s all a hoax trumped up by the West. Then, after the Russians create facts on the ground, they whine when anyone makes a fuss. So it is with the war on Christmas.

Exactly…  For more of this timely op/ed by Jonah Goldberg, click on the text above.  Merry Christmas!!    🙂

Starnes: CNN is a race-baiting, anti-Trump network

Leave it to the mainstream media to concoct some sort of wild-eyed theory that President Trump’s promise to say “Merry Christmas” is some sort of coded language for white nationalism and white supremacy. CNN host Don Lemon was among the most high-profile mainstream media minions to advance the race-baiting narrative. “This is a dog whistle to the base because no one has ever stopped using Merry Christmas,” the Clinton News Network host said during a Dec. 21 broadcast. In reality, the entire CNN network is a dog whistle for race-baiting, anti-Trump, America-bashing pinheads. And I said as much on Tuesday’s edition of “Hannity” on the Fox News Channel. But CNN is not the only mainstream media outlet to get its tinsel in a twist over the president’s frequent use of the words, “Merry Christmas.” Consider this headline from Newsweek: “How Trump and the Nazis Stole Christmas to Promote White Nationalism.” At first glance, I just assumed one of the copy editors had slurped a bit too much egg nog. But it turns out, Newsweek was dead serious. “Trump has been using the so-called war on Christmas to wage a culture war that pits multicultural liberals against Christian conservatives. He began doing this long before Christmas. Meanwhile, some members of the religious right support Trump’s most nationalist, race-baiting form of political rhetoric, including his reclaiming of Christmas,” Newsweek declared. Newsweek moaned about how the president is “promoting a version of the holidays that excludes members of other religions, and that his crusade to bring back Christmas is part of a larger attempt by the president to define America as a country for white Christians alone.” Apparently Newsweek is unaware that many African-Americans and Asian-Americans and Hispanic-Americas celebrate the Christmas season, too. “Wishing people merry Christmas’ instead of ‘happy holidays’ is thus in line with Trump’s decision to ban citizens of Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States, critics say. It fits neatly with his refusal to condemn white supremacists when they march against diversity, and with his condemnation of athletes who protest police brutality against black men,” the magazine noted. Far be it from me to offer psychological advice, but it sounds to me like Newsweek is a few nuts shy of a fruitcake. However, the mainstream media holds fast to its belief that Christmas is supposed to be some sort of all-inclusive, one-ornament-fits-all, religiously-neutral holiday. And yet they don’t seem to have a problem with the exclusivity of other religious holidays — like Ramadan. Why don’t we hear Don Lemon demanding that Muslim holidays be inclusive? I believe I know the answer. It’s because the attacks on President Trump and Christmas have nothing to do with inclusivity. It’s about marginalizing people of faith and silencing Christianity in the public square. In fairness to CNN and Newsweek, President Trump is sending the nation a coded-message. He’s telling us that it’s OK to say “Merry Christmas.” He’s telling us that he understands and recognizes the reason for the season. And in spite of what Don Lemon or CNN or Newsweek says, Christmas will always be an exclusively Christian holiday — a moment for us to celebrate the birth of the newborn King.

Exactly!!  And that’s what has the dominantly liberal mainstream media going ballistic!  For the past 8 years, they’ve had free reign to make fun of, and look down on Christians.  It’s really been the only form of politically correct bigotry allowed anymore.  Then along comes Donald Trump who stuffs it back in their face.  Kudos to veteran culture warrior Todd Starnes for that outstanding, and timely, piece.  CNN and Newsweek are gargage.  Thanks for reminding us, Todd!  Excellent!!    🙂

Pennsylvania family ordered to take down Jesus Christmas display after neighbor said it was ‘offensive’

A Pennsylvania family was ordered by their homeowner’s association to take down their Jesus Christmas display after one of the neighbors reported it as offensive. Mark and Lynn Wivell of Adams County, a Gettysburg subdivision, said they put up their Jesus display last Saturday, FOX43 reported. “As part of our Christmas decoration, we would display the name Jesus to point out to everyone that we in this family believe that the reason for the season is to celebrate the birth of Jesus,” said Mark Wivell told FOX43. But the homeowner’s association wasn’t having it. On Sunday, the association told the family to take down the sign after a neighbor complained it was offensive. The homeowner’s association also claimed the display was a sign, not a decoration – which is a violation of the rules, USA Today reported. “After taking a look at it, it isn’t in accordance with normal Christmas decorations,” Bud Vance, the Courtyards president, wrote in a statement to the Gettysburg Times. The Wivells insist they are following the rules. “We have ordinances with regard to Christmas decorations, and my Christmas decorations comply with the HOA ordinances on Christmas decorations,” Wivell said. The Wivells also said many others supported their right to display the sign. “When this happened, we were really shocked,” Lynn Wivell said. “We have gotten tremendous support from our neighbors here at the Links and that just makes us feel so good.” The family said they have no plans to take down the sign until January 15, when the association requires all displays to be taken down. Family members said they are unsure which neighbor was offended. “People get offended by different things, but just because something offends you, doesn’t mean the whole world has to change to accommodate you, so I would say please be more tolerant,” Mark Wivell said. Board members told FOX43 in a statement that it was “unfortunate” they were being portrayed as Scrooge. “It is, indeed, unfortunate that our attention has been unnecessarily redirected in this manner with a suggestion that Scrooge is alive and well in our community,” the statement read. “Many of our families will be in church on Monday with their spirit diminished by this attack.”

Well, then you shouldn’t have told the Wivells to take their “Jesus” sign down.  These spineless borad members are idiots.  And, this is the sorta thing that gives HOAs a bad name.  Having spent some time serving on the Board of Directors (BOD) of my HOA, I’ve seen both sides of such things.  And, I can empathize with those who complain when some neighbors do things that may diminish the value of the homes in the community, and/or do things that can be offensive to the majority of homeowners.  But, you need to use a little common sense.  Christmas is a federal holiday.  No, it’s NOT “Winter Solstice” day, or “Winter Holiday..day.”  It’s Christmas.  Period.  And, Jesus IS “the reason for the season.”  Those who have a problem with it need to get the heck over it…or move to another country.  We’re so very grateful to see President Trump supporting the phrase “Merry Christmas” which the White House is now putting on it’s Christmas Cards.  The last 8 years, Obama’s cards said, “Happy Holidays.”  Glad that politically correct crap is behind us..

‘Jingle Bells’ rooted in racism, Boston University professor says

“Jingle Bells,” one of the most well-known Christmas carols in the world, is now being called racist. A Boston University theater professor claims the Christmas carol has a “problematic history” because it was originally performed to make fun of African Americans. “The legacy of ‘Jingle Bells’ is one where its blackface and racist origins have been subtly and systematically removed from its history,” Kyna Hamill, a BU theater historian, wrote in her “Theatre Survey” research paper on the story of “Jingle Bells.” “Although ‘One Horse Open Sleigh,’ for most of its singers and listeners, may have eluded its racialized past and taken its place in the seemingly unproblematic romanticization of a normal ‘white’ Christmas, attention to the circumstances of its performance history enables reflection on its problematic role in the construction of blackness and whiteness in the United States,” she wrote. Hamill started researching the history of the famous Christmas carol after a so-called “Jingle Bells War” – a dispute between two towns, Medford, Mass. and Savannah, Ga. – that claim to be the birthplace of the song written by James Pierpont.“Jingle Bells,” one of the most well-known Christmas carols in the world, is now being called racist. A Boston University theater professor claims the Christmas carol has a “problematic history” because it was originally performed to make fun of African Americans. “The legacy of ‘Jingle Bells’ is one where its blackface and racist origins have been subtly and systematically removed from its history,” Kyna Hamill, a BU theater historian, wrote in her “Theatre Survey” research paper on the story of “Jingle Bells.” “Although ‘One Horse Open Sleigh,’ for most of its singers and listeners, may have eluded its racialized past and taken its place in the seemingly unproblematic romanticization of a normal ‘white’ Christmas, attention to the circumstances of its performance history enables reflection on its problematic role in the construction of blackness and whiteness in the United States,” she wrote. Hamill started researching the history of the famous Christmas carol after a so-called “Jingle Bells War” – a dispute between two towns, Medford, Mass. and Savannah, Ga. – that claim to be the birthplace of the song written by James Pierpont.“Jingle Bells,” one of the most well-known Christmas carols in the world, is now being called racist. A Boston University theater professor claims the Christmas carol has a “problematic history” because it was originally performed to make fun of African Americans. “The legacy of ‘Jingle Bells’ is one where its blackface and racist origins have been subtly and systematically removed from its history,” Kyna Hamill, a BU theater historian, wrote in her “Theatre Survey” research paper on the story of “Jingle Bells.” “Although ‘One Horse Open Sleigh,’ for most of its singers and listeners, may have eluded its racialized past and taken its place in the seemingly unproblematic romanticization of a normal ‘white’ Christmas, attention to the circumstances of its performance history enables reflection on its problematic role in the construction of blackness and whiteness in the United States,” she wrote. Hamill started researching the history of the famous Christmas carol after a so-called “Jingle Bells War” – a dispute between two towns, Medford, Mass. and Savannah, Ga. – that claim to be the birthplace of the song written by James Pierpont.

I think I’m gonna vomit.  You really can’t make this stuff up, folks.  Honestly, where do these people come from?  To read the rest of this nauseatingly politically correct nonsense courtesy of some idiot theater professor, just click on the text above.  Unreal..

Kim Jong Un orders North Koreans to celebrate his grandmother on Christmas

Kim Jong Un is the Grinch who stole Christmas. North Korea’s tubby tyrant wants the few Christians in the hermit state to spread cheer only to celebrate his grandma, Kim Jong Suk – not the birth of Jesus. Jong Suk — who was born on Christmas Eve in 1919 — was an anti-Japanese guerrilla and Communist activist, wife of North Korea’s first dictator, Kim Il Sung, and former leader Kim Jong Il’s mother. Many pay homage to the “Sacred Mother of the Revolution,” who died under mysterious circumstances in 1949, by visiting her tomb. The daffy dictator is so obsessed with banning Christmas that he even flipped out in 2014 when he found out that South Korea planned to erect a huge Christmas tree along the border. Amid threats of all-out war, the tree was never put up.

You really can’t make this stuff up, folks..

Editorial: The War on Christmas

In the opening sequence of Scrooged — which Sonny Bunch correctly identifies as one of the great Christmas movies of the modern age — we’re teased with the trailer for a movie called The Night the Reindeer Died. In this fictional made-for-TV movie, Santa’s workshop is attacked by machine-gun-wielding terrorists. Amid heavy artillery fire, Mrs. Claus races to the gun locker to hand out heavy weapons to the elves. Suddenly, Lee Majors, the Six Million Dollar Man (that’s $32 million in today’s dollars), rides up on a snowmobile. As the bullets fly, Majors asks Santa, “Is there a back way out of this place?” Kris Kringle responds, “Of course there is, Lee, but this is one Santa who’s going out the front door.” Majors nods silently in admiration of Santa’s grit. But he warns St. Nick, “Look, it don’t matter a hill of beans what happens to me, but the world couldn’t afford it if anything happened to you. Now you stay put.” “Aw, that’s very nice of you, Lee,” Santa says gratefully. He then adds, “And, Lee, you’re being a real good boy this year.” Majors then sets off on his death-dealing way to vanquish the enemies of Yuletide. “Eat this,” he grunts as he mows down the Santa-sacking psychos with his modernized hand-held Gatling gun. Now that’s my kind of war on Christmas. Alas, today’s “war on Christmas,” which has become for cable news an annual ritual, is merely another one of those metaphorical wars, like the wars on women, poverty, cancer, global warming, history, energy, religion, and science. (I’m sure I’m leaving a few dozen out.) Of course “metaphorical” doesn’t mean “fictional.” The “war” on poverty is — or was — a real thing; it just wasn’t a war. And yet the metaphorical wars have the capacity to elicit as much outrage as actual wars. For instance, in the Middle East and ever-growing swaths of Africa, there are nonmetaphorical wars on women, Christians, Jews, science, history, and gays. These wars have all the hallmarks of actual war, what with the killing, rape, and slavery. But in the United States the “war” on women that arouses so much passion from politicians and liberal activists should really be put in air quotes. Ditto the “war” on Christmas. Of course, the Left has always loved its metaphorical wars, ever since William James announced the pressing need for the “moral equivalent” of war. President Obama has kept that tradition alive, routinely calling for warlike unity in his effort to pour money down any number of rat holes. But the moment when the tail-chasing dog ate himself came when Obama declared a lexicological war on war, changing the “war on terror” to “overseas contingency operations.” Terrorist attacks became “man-caused disasters,” and American reprisals were euphemized as “kinetic military operations.” It was, to borrow a phrase, a metaphorical war to end all literal wars. We’ll know that battle has been won when we start talking about the Domestic Contingency Operation against Christmas. The merits of these metaphorical wars vary widely. War on cancer? Worth fighting. War on science? Mostly a bogus PR campaign to bully conservatives into silence. But the war on Christmas represents a special kind of passive-aggressive jackassery because the aggressors deny they have declared a war. They simply take offense at Christmas cheer. They cancel Christmas pageants. They leave baby Jesus in a cardboard box in the church basement, but see nothing wrong with celebrating the Winter Solstice as if that’s a more rational thing to do. And then, when people complain about this undeclared war on Christmas, the aggressors mock and ridicule them for paranoia and hyperbole. Since we’re comparing things to actual wars, it’s a bit like Vladimir Putin’s mischief in the Ukraine. He sends troops across the border, then denies they’re Russian soldiers. The soldiers kill Ukrainians, but Russian TV floats the idea it’s all a hoax trumped up by the West. Then, after the Russians create facts on the ground, they whine when anyone makes a fuss. So it is with the war on Christmas.

Indeed..  Jonah Goldberg over at National Review did that piece.. To read the rest, click on the text above.

Naughty list: University says Nativity scenes, mistletoe not inclusive

The folks over at Cornell University are worried about “inclusive seasonal displays.” That’s academic code for Christmas decorations. Cornell warned students that some “winter holiday displays” are not consistent with the university’s “commitment to diversity and inclusiveness.” Among the items on their naughty list are Nativity scenes, angels, crosses and mistletoe. I’m not quite sure why they frown upon the mistletoe – unless they want to discourage young fraternity men from spreading Christmas cheer among the Sorority girls. So for the sake of inclusion Cornell University recommends ditching the Baby Jesus and hemiparasitic plants. As we all know – a university cannot achieve complete inclusiveness until they’ve excluded cultures or traditions they find objectionable. “University members are reminded to be respectful of the religious diversity of our students and colleagues and are encouraged to use an inclusive approach in celebrating the holiday season,” read a statement on the university’s website. They suggested “focusing on the winter season rather than a particular holiday.” Specifically, they recommended decorating with snowflakes and “trees decorated with snowflakes and other non-religious symbols.” I reached out to the university for further explanation. They tell me the policies have been in place for quite some time. However, their guidelines pertaining to religious symbols and holiday inclusivity are currently under review and will be updated next year. I wonder if they plan on serving up pulled pork during Ramadan – for the sake of inclusivity, of course. Meanwhile, MRC-TV’s Ashley Rae Goldenberg reports that the student health center at the University of Missouri has banned all holiday decorations. “I’ve decided that holiday decorations will not be displayed this year,” Susan Even, the center’s executive director, wrote in an email to staff. “Our mission is to provide a safe, comfortable place for all students to receive their health care,” she continued. “Without meaning to, some of the holiday symbols that we may display could contradict that mission.” Jeezaloo, Mizzou, who knew that festive Christmas garland could cause you to break out in hives. “I know this decision will be disappointing to some of you, but I can assure you that the kindness, warmth and compassion that you show all students is as important now as any time of the year,” Even wrote. That means no twinkling lights or sugar plum fairies in your safe spaces, kids. There you have it, folks. For the sake of diversity and inclusion, American universities are taking the jolly out of our holly. Todd Starnes is host of Fox News & Commentary, heard on hundreds of radio stations. His latest book is “God Less America: Real Stories From the Front Lines of the Attack on Traditional Values.” Follow Todd on Twitter@ToddStarnes and find him on Facebook.

Todd is, as usual, right on the money here.  I’m just curious what the percentage is of the 20,000 or so students at Cornell who celebrate Christmas..and who probably feel EXcluded by this fascist school policy, ostensibly, meant to be INclusive.  As an aside..  Todd is hosting a very politically INcorrect Christmas special this evening on FoxNews channel.  Merry Christmas!    🙂