St. Louis

Missouri Governor Warns St. Louis Protesters: Only ‘Safe Space’ for Looters Is ‘in a Jail Cell’

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens warned demonstrators in St. Louis, Missouri, that looting and violence would not be tolerated as violent protesters continue to wreak havoc in the city. “We had leaders who wanted to give people a safe space to loot and to burn,” Greitens told Fox News. “Now in Missouri if you loot the only safe space you’re going to have is in a jail cell.” “If you’re going to riot we’re going to cuff you,” he continued. “Violence and vandalism is not protest. It is a crime.” Violent protesters stormed St. Louis following a judge’s decision Friday to acquit former police officer Jason Stockley, a white male, of murder charges in connection the 2011 shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith, a black male. Protesters squared off against cops dressed in riot gear while looters and vandals destroyed storefronts. Police have made more than 80 arrests as of Monday, and several officers had suffered non-life-threatening injuries. The demonstrators have also confronted reporters, such as the group of Black Lives Matter protesters who confronted a KTVI reporter covering the protests on Friday.

Liberal Sports Media and Gay Activists Blast St. Louis Cardinals for Inviting Lance Berkman to ‘Christian Day’ at Busch Stadium

The St. Louis Cardinals have found themselves in the crosshairs of the LGBT community for inviting former Cardinal Lance Berkman to the team’s annual Christian Day event. Berkman’s presence sparks controversy amongst the gay community because of his role in the fight against the transgender bathroom ordinance, aka the “Equal Rights Ordinance,” in Houston in 2015. Pride Center of St. Louis issued this highly critical statement of the Cardinals decision to invite Berkman: “Pride St. Louis is disappointed by the decision of the St. Louis Cardinals to provide a public platform for Berkman, an individual whose words and actions towards the LGBTQ+ are divisive and demeaning.” The group initially released the statement to Outsports, an SB Nation website which prioritizes news involving the LGBT community and sports. According to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, “On its own, Outsports has called Berkman a “bigot” and “an outspoken opponent of the LGBT community” who was “one of the faces of the campaign against Houston’s equal-rights ordinance” in 2015.” Despite the backlash, as of this writing, the Cardinals remain committed to having Berkman attend “Christian Day.” The team issued their own statement in response to those troubled by the move: “The Cardinals have hosted a Christian Day at the ballpark for nearly three decades. Lance Berkman participated in Christian Day when he was a Cardinals player, and we welcome him back this year to discuss his faith.”

Outstanding!!  Kudos to the front office of the St. Louis Cardinals for standing firm against the brazenly hypocritical bullying tactics of the gay mafia.  They want the right, and support, to have their gay days, and “pride” parades and so on…without ANY opposition whatsoever.  And yet, they don’t want the other aside (i.e. Christians) afforded the same freedom to express THEIR views and hold THEIR events.  The gay mafia are a bunch of self-righteous, self-serving, hypocritical, fascist, pc-police and speech Nazis.

Chuck Berry: Music legend given rock ‘n’ roll sendoff

Family, friends and fans paid their final respects to the rock `n’ roll legend Chuck Berry on Sunday, celebrating the life and career of a man who inspired countless guitarists and bands. The celebration began with a public viewing at The Pageant, a music club in Berry’s hometown of St. Louis where he often played. Hundreds of fans filed past Berry, whose beloved cherry-red Gibson guitar was bolted to the inside of his coffin’s lid. “I am here because Chuck Berry meant a lot to anybody who grew up on rock n’ roll,” said Wendy Mason, who drove in from Kansas City, Kan., for the visitation. “The music will live on forever.” Another fan, Nick Hair, brought his guitar with him from Nashville, Tenn., so he could play Berry’s “Johnny B. Goode” while waiting in line outside. After the public viewing, family and friends packed the club for a private funeral service and celebration of Berry, who inspired generations of musicians, from humble garage bands up to The Beatles and The Rolling Stones. The service was expected to include live music, and the Rev. Alex I. Peterson told the gathering they would be celebrating Berry’s life in rock `n roll style. Former President Bill Clinton sent a letter that was read at the funeral by U.S. Rep. Lacy Clay because Berry played at both of Clinton’s presidential inaugurations. The St. Louis Post-Dispatch reports that Clinton called Berry “one of America’s greatest rock and roll pioneers.” “He captivated audiences around the world,” Bill Clinton wrote. “His music spoke to the hopes and dreams we all had in common. Me and Hillary grew up listening to him.” Gene Simmons of the rock band KISS wasn’t scheduled to speak but someone urged him to take the podium. Simmons said Berry had a tremendous influence on him as a musician, and he worked to break down racial barriers through his music. Paul McCartney and Little Richard both sent notes of condolences. At the end of the funeral, a brass band played “St. Louis Blues” while Berry’s casket was carried out. When Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards spoke about Berry at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame’s 1986 induction ceremony — Berry was the first person inducted from that inaugural class — he said Berry was the one who started it all. That sentiment was echoed Sunday by David Letterman’s former band leader, Paul Shaffer, who spoke to the St. Louis Post-Dispatch outside the club. “Anyone who plays rock `n’ roll was inspired by him,” Shaffer said. Berry’s standard repertoire included about three-dozen songs, including “Johnny B. Goode,” “Sweet Little Sixteen” and “Roll Over Beethoven.” His songs have been covered by country, pop and rock artists such as AC/DC and Buck Owens, and his riffs live on in countless songs. The head of the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, Greg Harris, said “anybody who’s picked up a guitar has been influenced by him.” Well before the rise of Bob Dylan, Berry wedded social commentary to the beat and rush of popular music. “He was singing good lyrics, and intelligent lyrics, in the `50s when people were singing, “Oh, baby, I love you so,”‘ John Lennon once observed. “Everything I wrote about wasn’t about me, but about the people listening,” Berry once said.

Sounds like Chuck had a great send off in St. Louis.  As many of you know, that’s where I’m originally from.  St. Louis has a rich music heritage and culture…and Chuck is part of that great music heritage in the Gateway city.  Thanks for the tunes, Chuck.  R.I.P.

Teddy bears made from uniforms of slain St. Louis County officer

The widow of a slain St. Louis County police officer posted a heart-wrenching picture on Instagram showing their 2-year-old son hugging stuffed teddy bears made with his father’s uniform. “He’s been asking for his daddy a lot,” an emotional Elizabeth Snyder told Fox2Now.com. “Which is hard, because I don’t know how to respond to him yet, because every time I look at him, I’m reminded that my husband’s not coming home.” St. Louis County Police Officer Blake Snyder, 33, was fatally shot at point-blank range on Oct. 6. He was responding to a report of a disturbance in a normally quiet St. Louis County neighborhood of Green Park. Authorities said Snyder saw the 18-year–old suspect inside a car and ordered him to show his hands. Authorities said the suspect shot Snyder once with a 9 mm pistol that was found at the scene. Snyder was pronounced dead at a hospital a short time later. The community has rallied around the family.A park where the couple used to run is now dedicated in his name.Hundreds of police officers gathered for the dedication ceremony. The park was renamed in honor of Snyder following a petition drive signed by thousands. The photo of the boy, Malachi, was posted on Elizabeth’s Instagram account on Tuesday. The boy is smiling and holding the two bears closely. A large St. Louis County Police patch is easily visible on one of the bears. She posted, “There beautiful bears were made for us from Blake’s uniform.” “I am deeply proud of my husband,” she said. “He is a hero. A true hero, and his son will grow up knowing that.”

I’m sure he will.  As many of you know, we tend to avoid human interest stories, as there are so many other venues for that sorta thing.  But, every once in a while something catches our eye.  And, being from St. Louis County myself, this one hit home on a personal level.  To see some photos of Malachi and his hero dad, click on the text above.  Our prayers are definitely with Elizabeth and Malachi during this tough time.  Thank you for your service, Blake.  You are a true hero.  R.I.P.

Holliday homers in probable farewell with St. Louis Cardinals

After weeks of trying and trying and trying to get his fractured thumb healthy enough to be in the lineup, Matt Holliday rejoined the active roster Friday so the Cardinals could do something bigger than using him in a key at-bat or sending him out for a start. They wanted to say goodbye. With one swing, he handled the rest. In what could be his final at-bat as a Cardinal, Holliday came off the disabled list and into the batter’s box Friday against Pittsburgh, and hit a home run out to the right-field bullpen. Holliday’s 156th career homer for the Cardinals — his first ever as a pinch-hitter — punctuated a 7½-year tenure with the team, one that included an unprecedented run of success for the franchise. Having told him this week that they would not exercise his option for the 2017 season, the Cardinals wanted to give the home crowd a chance to acknowledge its All-Star and longtime No. 3 hitter. He earned a victory lap. “Still have chills,” manager Mike Matheny said after a 7-0 victory. Matheny and general manager John Mozeliak agreed to activate Holliday for the final series of the regular season and, if the opportunity presented itself, get him an at-bat. Holliday did not want an at-bat with a game or playoff berth on the line. A ceremonial one would be tough enough. The Cardinals didn’t want him to see him leave without an ovation. It started in the dugout. The applause spread from his teammates out through the crowd and onto the scoreboard that read, “Thank You Matt Holliday.” On an 0-2 pitch from Pittsburgh lefty Zach Phillips, Holliday hit his 20th home run of the season, landing with the relievers, for safekeeping. Kolten Wong pushed Adam Wainwright out onto the field with Yadier Molina to share a hug with the three players who have shared championships and five consecutive postseason berths. Holliday received a curtain call, averting his weeping eyes even as he raised his helmet. “Not much better way to go out than that,” Wainwright said. People who saw him described Holliday as “too emotional” to comment before or after the game. He conveyed some thoughts in a statement: “While I’m disappointed this could be it here in St. Louis, I understand that it might be time to move on.” “This guy has been a pillar in this organization for a good amount of time,” Matheny said. “Not knowing how things play out over the winter (we’re) trying to give him the respect that he deserves. Tough conversation for him. A tough conversation for all of us. But to try to make sure you don’t have any regret.” Holliday, 36, approached Mozeliak earlier this week to gain clarity on his future with the club. The former batting champ wanted to know as the final home stand came toward an end, if he should have his family present, if he should be planning some farewells. In eight years with the Cardinals, Holliday came to call St. Louis his home, spending several offseasons in the area. He developed a close relationship with several charities and was a regular visitor at Cardinal Glennon Children’s Hospital. At least once he delivered a home run ball to a patient there — on his way home from the game in which he hit it. The Cardinals hold a $17 million option for 2017, though Mozeliak said the probability of picking it up is “low.” As far back as spring training, Holliday understood that possibility and expressed a hope to discuss a lower-cost extension that would allow him to finish his career with the Cardinals. A hoped-for conversation in August was derailed by a fastball — in and hard to Holliday’s right hand. On Aug. 11, Cubs pitcher Mike Montgomery fractured Holliday’s right thumb with a pitch. Holliday elected to have surgery on the thumb to accelerate his recovery by providing stability. He could not hasten the healing of the bone and after each attempt to return his finger would swell up to a point he could not hit. The injury made the Cardinals’ decision for them. “It stinks,” Mozeliak said. “The unfortunate part of baseball or sports is injuries. But when you sit in my seat it cannot solely be relationship-driven. I have to think about this long term and what we think is best for this organization and how we think we can be stronger and how we can get stronger. So it’s unfortunate nothing lasts forever, especially in sports.” Mozeliak made Holliday his first major trade, pursuing talks first with Colorado and then successfully in July 2009 with Oakland. A free agent at the end of the 2009 season, Holliday signed a seven-year, $120 million deal that remains the largest in Cardinals history. During the span of the contract, only 16 hitters, six of them MVPs, had a higher OPS than Holliday’s .862. Holliday’s career OPS of .872 with the Cardinals ranked 10th in club history, as did his .493 slugging percentage and 156 homers. “Matt meant much more than statistics to the St. Louis Cardinals,” his agent Scott Boras said Friday. “Sometimes it’s difficult to imagine a clubhouse without a player and you realize it when you don’t have that player.” The Cardinals expect to generate some churn on the roster this offseason, and that could mean reshaping the middle of the lineup, the outfield, or both. Holliday will probably look to the American League, where there will be an opportunity to be a designated hitter. He has also shown he can play first base. That position could prompt the Cardinals and Holliday to engage in future discussions about a deal that would reflect a different, even part-time role on the team. Matheny stressed that they wanted to make sure the team gave him a fitting farewell, but not necessarily finality. “I wouldn’t say the future is set,” he said. “Doors are open. The way things are going I think it goes back to how do we not miss an opportunity, an opportunity to let our fans show the admiration they have for a great player and for us as an organization to tip our cap as well? Not saying that destines a decision any one direction, but just to make sure we at least do our very best to try and do what’s right.” If Friday was his last swing, it went where he took the team. A long way.

Indeed!  What a touching story about a real class act.  Thanks to Derrick Goold over at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch for bringing us that piece.  It’s so great that the Cardinal front office is keeping “doors open” about the future.  So, ya never know..  But, for now..this was a fitting tribute.  To see Matt’s (probable) final at bat with the Red Birds, and his curtain call, click on the text above.  Thanks for the great memories, Matt.  Hope you’ll continue to call the great city of St. Louis home.  GO CARDINALS!!!    🙂

UFO over St. Louis? Strange light over Gateway Arch sparks debate

A strange light that hovered over the St. Louis Gateway Arch this week is sparking plenty of debate on the internet. Surveillance footage recorded at Malcolm W Martin Memorial Park on Tuesday and posted to Facebook shows the mysterious object hovering over the famous arch. “We guarantee you will be perplexed if you watch all 5 minutes of this surveillance footage!” explained the Park, in a post on its Facebook page. The video has been viewed 615,000 times. Possible explanations for the light suggested by commenters on Facebook include a drone with a unidirectional light or a Chinese lantern. Fox 2 News also received video footage of the odd light from Chase Rhoads, who said that he saw something strange over the arch early Tuesday morning. Scott Air Force Base said there was nothing out of the ordinary to report when contacted by Fox 2 News, and a spokesman for the National Park Service said there were no reports of anything strange on Tuesday. This is not the first time that a mysterious object has been spotted near the St. Louis landmark. Video from the same camera at Malcolm W. Martin Memorial Park also captured an unexplained object that appeared in broad daylight on July 14 2016. Earlier this year video of a mysterious object near a military base in Dayton, Ohio, also had the internet buzzing. Last month, a strange, apparently burning object was spotted in the sky over parts of the western U.S. , generating plenty of chatter on social media. The object was later identified as a Chinese rocket burning up on re-entry into the Earth’s atmosphere. In January the CIA offered a peek into its ‘X-files,’ shining a spotlight on a series of once-classified UFO documents. The UFO documents, which date primarily from the 1940s and 1950s, are among hundreds that the CIA declassified in 1978.

Things that make ya go, “hmmm”..     🙂

10 things you never knew about Budweiser

Launched by Adolphus Busch in 1876, Budweiser is still one of America’s top selling and best-known beer brands. And while craft brews may be making a dent in the big guys’ appeal, the brand still boasts a loyal fan base and continues to turn out great a campaigns. From the famous Clydesdales to Helen Mirren’s sassy anti-drunk driving Super Bowl commercial, here are a few things you may not have known about Budweiser.

To see the list, click on the text above.  As someone originally from St. Louis, AB is an institution in that great city.     🙂