St. Louis

Felon Charged with Murdering Retired Police Captain David Dorn in Riots

A convicted felon has been charged with murdering St. Louis, Missouri, 77-year-old retired police captain David Dorn during riots in the city last week. The St. Louis Police Department announced Sunday that 24-year-old convicted felon Stephan Cannon has been arrested and charged with first-degree murder, first-degree robbery, first-degree burglary, armed criminal action, and unlawfully possessing a firearm after he allegedly murdered Dorn. On June 2, according to police, Dorn was guarding Lee’s Pawn and Jewelry in St. Louis while riots, fires, and looting broke out. Surveillance footage, police said, shows Dorn arriving at the pawn shop, which had already been looted by Cannon and other men. That is when Cannon can allegedly be seen on the footage approaching the corner of the pawn shop with a gun, and it is at this time that Dorn was shot, killed, and left on the sidewalk bleeding. While searching Cannon’s residence, St. Louis police officers recovered a TV that had been looted from the pawn shop that night. Cannon is currently being held without bail. Dorn had served nearly 40 years with the St. Louis Police Department before retiring in 2007. Dorn also served as police chief in the small town of Moline Acres, Missouri.

This is a story we’ve been keeping an eye on the last couple of days.  And, we’re happy to report this piece of garbage is finally in jail and being held without bail, as well he should.  Hopefully the others who were accomplices and also looted, and then stood by and did nothing but videotape “Cap” bleeding out for FaceBook will be rounded up as well, and charged.  Of course, we’ll continue to keep an eye on this story.  For more, click on the text above.

St. Louis police release surveillance video of 7 ‘persons of interest’ in death of retired officer David Dorn

Surveillance footage capturing a group of men breaking into a pawn shop around the same time of the killing of a retired police captain attempting to prevent looting was released by St. Louis authorities Friday. The video shows seven “persons of interest” running into Lee’s Pawn & Jewelry on Tuesday during a night of widespread looting and rioting following a mostly peaceful protest over the death of George Floyd. The men all have their faces covered — six with masks and one with another covering. One man takes off his mask and puts his left hand to his mouth. Authorities believe he may have cut himself. At least two of the men were armed with handguns. The video runs from 2:13 a.m. to 2:17 a.m. David Dorn, 77, was found dead from a gunshot to the torso around 2:30 a.m. Prior to working security at the pawn shop, he served as a police captain with the St. Louis Metropolitan Police Department and a police chief in nearby Moline Acres. He retired in 2014 after more than 40 years in law enforcement. “They called him ‘Cap.’ That was the Cap. That was the Cap, everybody knows that was him,” Dorn’s son, Brian Powell, told Fox2Now, adding that “police work ran through his veins.” Investigators said Dorn was killed responding to a burglar alarm at the shop. He often checked on the store, which is owned by a friend. “David Dorn was exercising law enforcement training that he learned here,” St Louis Police Chief John Hayden said. His death occurred during a night in the city that saw looting and property damage following protests over the May 25 death of Floyd, a black man who died while in police custody in Minneapolis, Minn. Dorn was found on a sidewalk in front of the shop. A Facebook Live video captured some of his last moments. Powell said if Dorn was still alive, he would have shown empathy toward his attacker. “My dad, he is a forgiving soul. So he would have forgiven that person and try to talk to them because he was real big on trying to talk to youth and mentoring young people as well,” he said. “He was trying to get them on the straight and narrow and everything.” President Trump weighed in on Dorn’s death earlier this week, saying he was “viciously shot and killed by despicable looters” and that “we honor our police officers, perhaps more than ever before.” Anyone with information about the fatal shooting is asked to contact St. Louis homicide detectives. A $45,000 reward is being offered by Crime Stoppers for information leading to an arrest.

Or you can reach the St. Louis PD Homicide Div directly by calling:  (314) 444-5371.  For more info, and/or to see the video of these “persons of interest,” click on the text above.  These are pieces of garbage; total scum. If you have any info that’ll lead to an arrest of these maggots, you could get up to $45K.  Normally we don’t do the crime beat thing here at The Daily Buzz.  But, I’m originally from St. Louis, and this one hits close to home.  So, we’ll make an exception here. I’m disgusted by this and we need to find these animals and arrest them.  We can’t have thugs and bullies like this on the street.  “Cap” was the father of 5 and the grandfather of 10.  He was a good man who served his community and was loved.  What happened to him cannot stand.  We’ll, of course, keep an eye on this developing story.

Gutfeld on the murder of Mr. Dorn

David Dorn spent his last moments on Earth bleeding to death on a sidewalk in front of a looted shop early Tuesday. He was a retired police captain in St. Louis and he was protecting a store. Dorn was 77. His death was shown on Facebook Live. He was a black man. A family man. A good man. Black lives matter. But not to looters, rioters and agitators. Shall we blame this on systemic racism? Who shot David Dorn? Who knows? A stranger? Maybe Seth Rogan or Patton Oswalt already bailed him out. Dorn’s son, Brian Powell said of his father’s death: “It was senseless – over TVs, over stuff that’s replaceable. They’re forgetting the real message for the protest and the positiveness that’s supposed to come out of it and we get this negative light that’s shown on a situation that really needed light to be brought to it.” Dorn’s daughter-in-law, Vanessa Powell, said: “I just hope that the person that did this that they come forth or whatever because this is just so senseless, and I’m just I’m tired of it, I’m tired.” The fact is, fealty to the mob begets only more of the mob. Redefining bloodlust as justified leads to death. And not just David Dorn’s, but a country’s too. A day ago was Blackout Tuesday, when virtue-signalers set their Instagrams to all black to support the protests going on around the country. What an analogy for the media. The media blacks the violence to hide their culpability. Which protects incompetent leaders, criminals and an army of cowardly journalists. Their job: keep the chaos on endless repeat. -Maybe David Dorn’s death can change things. Maybe we can protest loudly in his name and loudly demand action. It’s time, because there’s no Superman coming to save the day for us. There’s no one but us. On CNN, Chris Cuomo said: “Please, show me where it says protesters are supposed to be polite and peaceful. Because I can show you that outraged citizens are the ones who have America what she is and led to any major milestones. Be honest, this is not a tranquil time.” No thanks to Chris Cuomo. As cities are ravaged, he says protests don’t have to be peaceful. Chris, I invite you to meet me in my neighborhood to see what outrage created – the ravaged stores, the dead-eyed looks from people trying to salvage what’s left of their lives. If only they could work in media, and see the silver lining in their ruin. This is not a tranquil time. Thanks for the honesty, Chris.

How sad..  Thanks to Greg Gutfeld for sharing this with us.  That was adapted from his “Gregologue” on June 3rd, 2020 on The Five.  To watch it, click on the text above.  R.I.P Mr. Dorn.

Bouwmeester back in St. Louis, ‘on the road to recovery’

Blues defenseman Jay Bouwmeester is back in St. Louis after collapsing on the bench during a game in Anaheim last week and said in a statement Tuesday that he is “on the road to recovery.” Bouwmeester, 36, collapsed during the first period of the Feb. 11 game after going into cardiac arrest. He had a cardioverter defibrillator implanted into his chest at UCI Medical Center in Orange County, California, where he had been hospitalized until returning to St. Louis on Sunday. In a statement issued by the Blues, Bouwmeester thanked team trainers for both the Blues and Ducks, along with first responders and the medical staff at UCI Medical Center. “Our family has felt the support of the entire National Hockey League family and the city of St. Louis during this time,” Bouwmeester said in the statement. “We have all been greatly comforted by your genuine concern. On Sunday evening, I returned to St. Louis and I am on the road to recovery. My wife and daughters are forever grateful for everyone’s support and we will continue to have a positive outlook for our future.“ The game was postponed and will be played March 11. It will begin with a 1-1 score, as it was at the time of the postponement, but still follow a full 60-minute format.

Glad you’re doing better, Jay!  This story broke last night as the Blues shut out the NJ Devils 0-3 at home in St. Louis.  GO BLUES!!!      🙂

St. Louis Blues’ Jay Bouwmeester hospitalized but in ‘good spirits’ after bench collapse

Jay Bouwmeester remains in Southern California, but the veteran St. Louis Blues defenseman was alert and talking with teammates one day after collapsing on the bench during a game. “He was in good spirits with us, typical Jay, so I think it certainly made us all feel a lot better knowing that we had the opportunity to talk to him. Typical Jay is a very good Jay,” defenseman Alex Pietrangelo said. The 36-year old Bouwmeester suffered a cardiac episode during the first period of Tuesday night’s game against the Anaheim Ducks. General manager Doug Armstrong said during a news conference in Las Vegas on Wednesday that Bouwmeester was unresponsive after collapsing on the bench. A defibrillator was used and he regained consciousness immediately before being taken to an Anaheim hospital. “He is doing very well and is currently undergoing a battery of tests. Things are looking very positive,” Armstrong said. Pietrangelo — who was one of the first to call for help after Bouwmeester slumped over with 7:50 left in the first period — said he visited Bouwmeester in the hospital Tuesday night and the rest of team got to see him via FaceTime. The team stayed overnight in Southern California before taking a chartered flight to Las Vegas, where they will play the Golden Knights on Thursday. Bouwmeester’s father was at the game as part of the team’s annual dads trip and accompanied his son to the hospital. The team had a meeting at the hotel in Las Vegas before the media was allowed in. Several players remained for the news conference and appeared shaken and tired after a long night and morning. “It’s hard to even explain, it happened so fast, it felt like it was an eternity for us,” Pietrangelo said. “It’s not easy to see anybody go through it, let alone your close friend and teammate that you spend every day with. Certainly, we’re lucky to have each other anytime you’re going through something like this.” While Bouwmeester remains hospitalized, the Blues are trying to refocus on hockey. The defending Stanley Cup champions lead the Western Conference with 73 points but the gap between the top three teams in the Central Division was only four points going into Wednesday’s games. Armstrong and players lauded the Ducks and Blues medical staffs for their quick work. “How quickly they got on there to revive Jay to get him back is a testament to the work that is done and a testament to the NHLPA and the NHL for making sure that teams do all the proper work behind the scenes and have the people in the right spots, that are there to help the guys if anything happens,” Armstrong said. The NHL has had standards in place to deal with potential life-threatening cardiac problems for several seasons. They include having a team physician within 50 feet of the bench. An orthopedic surgeon and two other doctors are also nearby. Defibrillators must also be in close range. The home team has one on its bench and the away team must have theirs no further away than their locker room. Each medical team regularly rehearses the evacuation of a severely injured player before the season and all players are screened for serious cardiac conditions. The last player to collapse on an NHL bench before Bouwmeester was Dallas forward Rich Peverley in 2014. Peverley had an irregular heartbeat, and the quick response of emergency officials made sure he was OK. Detroit’s Jiri Fischer had a similar episode in 2005. “The Peverley and Fischer incidents and now Bouwmeester reminded us all how important it is to have team doctors close to players’ benches and defibrillators easily accessible in short notice,” said Edmonton Oilers general manger Ken Holland, who was with Detroit in 2005 when Fischer collapsed on the bench. “It has probably saved all their lives. Incredible job by league and team medical people.” Bouwmeester — who is in his 17th NHL season — was skating in his 57th game this season and the 1,241st of his NHL career. He had skated 1:20 in his last shift before collapsing and logged 5:34 of ice time as the game got going. The Blues and Ducks are talking with the league about making up the game, which was postponed. Armstrong said a full 60 minutes will be played and it will resume with the game tied at 1.

And that’s so great that they did that!  We’re all pullin for ya, Jay!  The Blues will play in Vegas tonight playing the Golden Knights.  GO BLUES!!!!     🙂

Saint Louis Zoo named best zoo in the country, again

The Saint Louis Zoo has been named the best zoo in the country for the second year in a row. Not that there was ever any doubt in our minds. Saint Louis was voted No. 1 in the USA Today best zoo category in the 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards contest. The Saint Louis Zoo was one of 20 nominated U.S. zoos, which were hand-picked by a panel of zoo and family travel experts. “We’re humbled to be chosen again as the best zoo by our dedicated fans in the St. Louis region, across Missouri and friends around the country,” Jeffrey Bonner, president and CEO of the Saint Louis Zoo, said in a statement. “Our visitors, volunteers, members, generous donors, employees, and especially the taxpayers of St. Louis City and St. Louis County are the real champions. It’s through their strong support that we can provide superior care for the animals, save wildlife in wild places, connect people with nature, and offer a great place to spend time with friends and family members.” Visitors to the 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards website were asked to vote for their favorites between April 2 and April 30. Behind the Saint Louis Zoo was Omaha’s Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium, and rounding out the top five are, the Cincinnati Zoo & Botanical Garden, the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo and the Fort Worth Zoo. In addition to winning in the best zoo category, the Saint Louis Zoo’s Sea Lion Sound exhibit also was named the best zoo exhibit in the USA Today 10Best Readers’ Choice Awards contest.

Nice!!  Growing up in St. Louis, I used to go to the St. Louis Zoo ALL the time.  And, sure I’m biased..  BUT..  Having been to the zoo in San Diego, and the National Zoo in D.C, both of which are outstanding, I can still see how the St. Louis Zoo won.  Congrats to Jeffrey Bonner and his team at the St. Louis Zoo.  Another great win for St. Louis!  Excellent!!    🙂

Dream come true for St. Louis — Blues reign as Stanley Cup champions

The scene was surreal, almost beyond comprehension. Blues captain Alex Pietrangelo hoisted the Stanley Cup on Wednesday night in Boston. It happened. It really happened. The star-crossed franchise won the Cup. That this thrilling title run came when it was least expected — after the Blues sank to the NHL cellar midway into this season — was so appropriate. The Blues did not win it all with Brett Hull and Adam Oates working their magic. They did not win it after hiring Mike Keenan and trading for Wayne Gretzky. They did not win the Cup after winning the Presidents’ Trophy with Al MacInnis and Chris Pronger dominating the blue line. They did not win with Ken Hitchcock cracking his whip on his hard-hitting, veteran-driven team. They won when their interim coach rallied the troops and their No. 4 goaltender became a local sports legend. They won on the road 4-1 in Game 7 against an excellent Bruins team in Boston. Perfect! This unlikeliest of runs triggered so many memories. I came to the Post-Dispatch in 1986, just missing the “Monday Night Miracle” season and catching the tail end of the ever-colorful Harry Ornest Era. I quickly learned this franchise had really bad luck but incredible heart. I learned that from Barclay Plager, who was battling on as an assistant coach while fighting brain tumors. In layman’s terms, doctors inserted wires into his tumors and fried them. The tumors kept coming back and the doctors kept frying them. This took a heavy toll on his body but not his spirit. When he was able, Barclay assisted new Blues coach Jacques Martin, who came from junior hockey, and assistant coach Doug MacLean, who came from the Canadian university scene. Barclay pushed and pushed and pushed forward until his stamina finally gave out. He took a scary fall at the Buffalo airport while he was still traveling with the team. He refused to concede to his illness. Even by hockey player standards, that was insane, I sat with Bob Plager at the Affton Ice Rink during Barclay’s final days, discussing their life story, their early runs at the Cup, their pride in wearing the Blue Note and the old-school values they passed on to the next generation. For these men, playing for the Blues and their fans was a privilege. That’s their legacy and Bob remained around the organization to remind us of that. So many heart-and-soul players followed the Plagers, guys like Bernie Federko, Brian Sutter, Kelly Chase, David Backes and Barret Jackman. So much happened to this franchise before my time, such as Bob Gassoff’s fatal motorcycle accident, the near-move to Saskatoon and the franchise shutting down when the NHL blocked that sale. So many things happened during my time, such as losing broadcaster Dan Kelly to cancer and losing nice guy Doug Wickenheiser to his prolonged cancer battle. Two No. 38s who played here, Pavol Demitra and Igor Korolev, died in a Russian plane crash. More recently there was Todd Ewen’s suicide, a tragic reminder of the high price hockey’s tough guys paid for the barbaric (Chuck) Norris Division days. There was the craziness of Mike Shahanan and Jack Quinn taking on the league as outlaw operators. There was Quinn and Keenan taking the insanity to the next level. There was Bill and Nancy Laurie throwing crazy money at the Blues while also trying to land a NBA team. There were the various work stoppages, a strike and lockouts, half-seasons and a lost season. There was the Laurie Fire Sale (Pronger for Eric Brewer!) and more questions about the franchise’s future. There was the phone call that came out of the blue. Broadcaster John Davidson tracked me down on the road in rural Ohio during my eldest daughter’s visit to a prospective college. Could the NHL still succeed in St. Louis? Davidson played for the Blues back in the day and felt the love of the fans, but he wanted a market update. He was calling around to get opinions on the state of the team. He heard the same things again and again: The Blues have an unfailingly loyal fan base. It wasn’t huge, but it was resilient. Make an effort and those Bluesiers will turn out to back the team. Dave Checketts and Co. banked on that support and saved the franchise. Davidson left his successful broadcasting career for the bigger challenge of rebuilding the Blues and rewarding fans for their patience. Davidson started the Blues down the road to overdue glory. Tom Stillman’s ownership group took over and finished the job. And so here we are. St. Louis is going crazy. This long-overdue party will carry well into Thursday which will be a low-productivity day in this region. There will be a parade, too, and more partying. Some folks who hung high above the goal in the cheap seats at The Arena will be there. So will fans who lined up before dawn to gain admission into Brentwood Ice Rink for training camp. Sadly, so many great Bluesiers have passed on, superfans like my friend John Mohan. He lived for Blues hockey to the moment he died. This Cup is for all of John Mohans who kept the franchise going through the lean years. This Cup is for all those diehards who never quit believing that this day could come. It did. Believe it or not, it did. Party on St. Louis, party on.

What a game!  What a series!  As someone originally from St. Louis, boy I wish I was back home.  On a personal note to that story above..  John Mohan was the older brother of my older brother’s friend.  St. Louis is a big city, with a small-town feel.  Thanks to local St. Louis Post-Dispatch sports write Jeff Gordon for giving us that feel.  For videos and such from the local media regarding this historic victory for the Blues, and it’s loyal fans, click on the text above.  GO BLUES!!!     🙂

St. Louis Blues advance to Stanley Cup Final with Game 6 win against Sharks

The St. Louis Blues advanced to the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 1970 with a 5-1 win against the San Jose Sharks in Game 6 of the Western Conference Final at Enterprise Center on Tuesday. St. Louis, which won the final three games of the best-of-7 series, will play the Boston Bruins in the Cup Final. Game 1 is at Boston on Monday. ladimir Tarasenko and Brayden Schenn each scored a power-play goal, Ryan O’Reilly had three assists, and Jordan Binnington made 25 saves for the Blues. “The final minutes, counting down there and how loud the rink was and the atmospehere was awesome,” Binnington said. “We’re excited and looking forward to the next round.” Dylan Gambrell scored, and Martin Jones made 14 saves for the Sharks, who were without defenseman Erik Karlsson and forwards Tomas Hertl and Joe Pavelski because of injury. “I was proud of our group tonight,” San Jose coach Peter DeBoer said. “I don’t think the score reflected the work that we put in. I know what the scoreboard said at the end of the night, but I felt we made them earn it tonight. I thought we showed up under tough circumstances. … That’s all you can ask.” Perron gave the Blues a 1-0 lead 1:32 into the first period when he tipped a shot from Sammy Blais. Tarasenko made it 2-0 with a wrist shot from the left face-off circle at 16:16 of the first. He had at least one point in each game of the series (three goals, five assists). “Nobody wants to fly four more hours back to San Jose,” Tarasenko said. “We had a chance like this [to clinch in Game 6 of the first round against the Winnipeg Jets]. Everybody was preparing and ready to end it tonight.”

GO BLUES!!!!!!       🙂

Ozuna homers, St. Louis Cardinals beat Nationals for 8th straight win

Marcell Ozuna homered and Austin Gomber tossed six shutout innings to lead the St. Louis Cardinals to a 4-2 win over the Washington Nationals on Wednesday night. St. Louis has won a season-high eight straight. The Cardinals, who are 18-9 since the All-Star break, captured their sixth successive series after taking the first three of the four-game set. Daniel Murphy homered in the ninth for Washington, which has lost four in a row and seven of nine to fall below .500 and nine games behind the first-place Atlanta Braves in the NL East. The current skid began with a loss to the Cubs on a two-out, walk-off grand slam. Ozuna homered in the second inning, his 14th of the season and his first since July 30. Gomber (3-0), in his fourth start of the year, gave up three hits, struck out six and walked four. Bud Norris pitched the ninth to pick up his 23rd save in 27 opportunities. Harrison Bader and Yadier Molina added run-scoring hits for St. Louis, which improved to 19-9 since Mike Matheny was fired and replaced by interim manager Mike Shildt. St. Louis infielder Matt Carpenter extended his on-base streak to 33 games with a walk in the fifth. It’s the longest current streak in the majors. Carpenter left the game in the seventh after he was hit on the hand by a pitch from Matt Grace, but X-rays were negative. Jeremy Hellickson (5-3) left in the fifth inning after colliding with Bader on a play at the plate following a wild pitch. Hellickson gave up three runs, two earned, on three hits in 4 1/3 innings. He struck out two and walked two. Bader, who had three hits, also made a diving catch of a liner off the bat of Bryce Harper in the fourth. The Cardinals, who have an NL-best 12-2 mark in August, remain one game behind Philadelphia for the second wild card spot. They are four games behind Chicago in the NL Central.

Yeah!!!  GO CARDINALS!!!     🙂

Brooks Koepka holds off Tiger Woods, Adam Scott to win PGA Championship

Brooks Koepka secured his status as one of the best golfers in the world Sunday as he won his third major in 14 months at the PGA Championship at Bellerive Country Club outside St. Louis. Koepka, who successfully defended his U.S. Open title at Shinnecock Hills in June, shot a final-round 66 to hold off Tiger Woods (64) by two shots. Adam Scott shot 67 to finish alone in third, a shot behind Woods. Koepka is the first man to win two majors in the same calendar year since Jordan Spieth won the Masters and U.S. Open in 2015. He is the first man to pull off the U.S. Open-PGA Championship double since Woods in 2000. His 72-hole score of 264 set the PGA Championship scoring record and matched the major championship record set by Henrink Stenson at Royal Troon in the 2016 British Open. The 28-year-old Floridian also joined Jordan Spieth, Woods, Nicklaus and Tom Watson as the only players with three majors before turning 30 since World War II. Koepka had started the final round two shots ahead of Scott, who was playing with a heavy heart after fellow Australian pro Jarrod Lyle died of cancer earlier this week. The Florida native appeared to be in command halfway through the round, weathering bogeys at 4 and 5 to take a three-shot lead over Scott at the turn. But Scott rallied at the same time that Koepka’s touch with the putter deserted him. The Australian birdied 10, 12, and 13, while Koepka missed short birdie putts at 12, 13, and 14. With Koepka stuck in neutral, Woods put on a charge and sent the galleries into a frenzy when he birdied the par-4 15th to get within a shot of the lead after sticking his second shot within a foot of the flagstick. However, Koepka regained control of the championship on the 15th hole, when he drilled a 10-foot birdie putt into the center of the cup to take a one-shot lead. He added to his advantage at the par-3 16th, when he stuck his tee shot to inside seven feet of the hole, then drained the ensuing birdie putt. Scott had one last chance to force some drama on the last hole, but a six-foot birdie putt on the 17th green that would have put him within one shot of Koepka curled wide of the cup. He then bogeyed the final hole to slip out of a tie for second. Woods’ 64, which included two bogeys, is his lowest final-round score in any major. It was his seventh runner-up finish and first since the 2009 PGA Championship. Woods and Koepka played nine holes of a practice round on Wednesday, and the 14-time major champion knew what he was up against. “It’s tough to beat when the guy hits it 340 down the middle,” Woods said. “What he did at Shinnecock, just bombing it, and then he’s doing the same thing here. … And when a guy’s doing that and hitting it straight, and as good a putter as he is, it’s tough to beat.” Koepka never imagined a year like this. He missed four months at the start of the year when a partially torn tendon in his left wrist, causing him to sit out the Masters. He outlasted good friend Dustin Johnson at Shinnecock Hills to become the first back-to-back U.S. Open champion in 29 years. And now this. Koepka joked about working out in a public gym this week with Johnson and not being recognized. He has been motivated by more serious moments, from being left off the “notable scores” section of TV coverage at tournaments and even last week, when he was not summoned for a TV interview to preview the PGA Championship. He now is No. 2 in the world, with a shot at overtaking Johnson in two weeks when the FedEx Cup playoffs start,

Tiger came close…but no purse!  Congrats to Brooks!  Over 55,000 fans were in attendance and the players were impressed with the politeness and positive attitude of the St. Louis fans.  Excellent!!  To see some pics and videos from Bellerive Country Club in West St. Louis County, just click on the text above.    🙂