Socialism

Bernie Sanders defends Fidel Castro’s socialist Cuba: ‘Unfair to simply say everything is bad’

Sen. Bernie Sanders, the frontrunner for the Democrats’ presidential nomination, doubled down on his support for some of Cuban dictator Fidel Castro’s policies, saying in an interview that aired Sunday, “it’s unfair to simply say everything is bad.” Speaking to CBS News’ “60 Minutes,” Sanders, a self-proclaimed democratic socialist, pointed to social welfare programs introduced under Castro’s regime that he described as redeeming, despite the communist dictator’s often repressive human-rights violations against Cubans. “We’re very opposed to the authoritarian nature of Cuba but you know, it’s unfair to simply say everything is bad. You know? When Fidel Castro came into office, you know what he did? He had a massive literacy program. Is that a bad thing? Even though Fidel Castro did it?” Sanders told Anderson Cooper. Fidel Castro relinquished power to his brother, Raúl, in 2011 after nearly half a century in charge of the island nation; Fidel died in 2016. Some Republicans jumped on Sanders’ comments. “It really makes a difference when those you murder at the firing squad can read & write,” Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, tweeted. In a resurfaced speech given at the University of Vermont in 1986, Sanders praised the socialist policies implemented in Cuba by the Castro regime and criticized bipartisan efforts in the U.S. to tamp down on Castro’s spread of communism. While Sanders said in the new interview he “condemns” any human rights violations Castro committed, he also took aim at President Trump for his unlikely friendships with some dictators or strongman leaders, including North Korea’s Kim Jong Un and Russia’s Vladimir Putin. “I do not think that Kim Jong Un is a good friend,” Sanders said. “I don’t trade love letters with a murdering dictator. Vladimir Putin, not a great friend of mine.” Despite victories in all three of the earliest state contests, the Vermont senator has faced criticism from other party contenders, including billionaire Michael Bloomberg, who lambasted his socialist policies declaring they would never fare in a November matchup with Trump. Sanders went on to define his brand of democratic socialism, which has tapped into a more progressive ideology that has been gaining traction with young voters across the country. “When Donald Trump was a private businessman in New York, he got $800 million in tax breaks and subsidies to build luxury housing. That’s called corporate socialism. What democratic socialism is about is saying, ‘Let’s use the federal government to protect the interests of working families,'” he explained. Trump has used Sanders’ policy initiatives, including “Medicare-for-all” and free college tuition and elimination of student loan debt, to take aim at the senator, even going so far as to label him a communist. “You know what? We will fight back,” Sanders said of these attacks. “This is what we will bring up… that the president of the United States is a pathological liar, and it is increasingly clear that many people just don’t believe anything that he says. He is a fraud. I look forward to taking him on.”

Of COURSE Bernie is a communist!  The man and his wife spent their honeymoon in Moscow back when it was the SOVIET UNION, for crying out loud!  But, admitting to that would probably be a bridge too far for his base.  Soo..  he settles for “democratic socialist.”  Heck, he’s not even a registered Democrat.  At any rate, the fact that he’s currently defending a brutal communist dictator like Fidel should surprise nobody.  He recently defended China in a similar way.  Bernie is a nauseating, self-righteous, and brazenly hypocritical communist.  “Mini” Mike Bloomberg even recently call him out for his millions and his three mansions.  For Bernie it’s “do as I say; not as I do.”  He’s such a hypocrite.  Anyway, for more on this story, click on the text above.

Democrats’ minimum wage hikes will kill jobs, small businesses: Former McDonald’s USA CEO

Democratic presidential candidate Tom Steyer’s plan to raise the federal minimum wage to $22 per hour is “absurd,” former McDonald’s USA CEO Ed Rensi warned FOX Business’ Dagen McDowell Monday. “It will put small businesses out of business; it will be dilatory to job growth in every way possible,” Rensi said on “Mornings with Maria.” Rensi noted small businesses are the biggest ongoing generators of American jobs. Small businesses employ 47.3 percent of the private workforce in the U.S., according to 2019 U.S. Small Business Administration data. Restaurants like McDonald’s face labor costs of about 33 percent of its sales, which, according to Rensi, is very high. If the minimum wage increases to $22 per hour as Steyer is proposing, he said the costs of labor will increase 50 to 60 percent. This, Rensi insisted, will result in the price of a hamburger increasing from $4 to $9 or $10. “It just isn’t workable from an economic standpoint,” he said. “It’s inflationary; it’s a job killer, and it’s very depressing to small businesses.” Rensi argued the minimum wage is not meant to be a living wage, maintaining it’s supposed to be an entry-level wage for workers with little-to-no skills. “I think some of these politicians are out of their minds,” Rensi declared. “You would think by now that they understand that the entry-level worker making minimum wage should progress through mentoring and training into other jobs.” When asked about the declining participation in the federal food stamp program SNAP, Rensi expressed his hopefulness. “Most people really would prefer to work for a living and earn the food opportunities that they have and to be able to enjoy the commerce of the United States like everyone else,” he said. He recalled growing up around the coal and steel industries in West Virginia and Ohio where people of “great pride and dignity” were forced by their situation onto welfare. He noted the psychological damage and hopelessness felt by people in such a position.

Raising the minimum wage always sounds good, until its properly analyzed.  And, one would think that a BILLIONAIRE like Tom Steyer would understand that.  But, he’s running for the Democrat nominee for President.  So, he has to spout out the standard talking points that are popular with the Democrat low-information demographic.  Thanks to Ed Rensi for injecting a little common sense into the discussion here.  An entry level job at McDonald’s or some other fast food business is exactly that; an entry level position.  So, the pay isn’t supposed to be a “living wage.”

‘Socialist’ seen as most unpopular quality in presidential candidate, poll finds

A new poll by NBC News/Wall Street Journal indicates that 67 percent of voters are “very uncomfortable” with having a presidential candidate who is a socialist, despite the Democratic party’s front-runner, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., declaring himself as such. Despite this, the liberal candidate who has proposed a progressive legislative agenda as part of his campaign’s bid for the White House, including “Medicare-for-All” and free college tuition, narrowly clinched the first two early-voting states for the season in both the Iowa caucuses and the New Hampshire primary and is leading in most national polls. Sanders isn’t the only candidate dubbed a socialist though; Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-N.H., who shares many of the same policy stances as Sanders, has also been dubbed the same at times. Socialism was among six other characteristics that gave voters pause. The others included a candidate who is older than 75, had a heart attack in the last year, is younger than 40, self-funds their own campaign with millions of dollars, is gay or lesbian, or is a woman. Fifty-three percent of voters have reservations/are very uncomfortable with someone who’s older than 75. Sanders, the oldest candidate in the race, is 78, and former Vice President Joe Biden, another top contender, is 77. Fifty-seven percent of voters say they have reservations/are very uncomfortable with someone who had a heart attack in the last year. Sanders suffered from a heart attack in October 2019 but made a swift recovery, hitting the campaign trail again less than a month later. Forty-one percent have reservations/are very uncomfortable with someone who self-funds their campaign with hundreds of millions of dollars. Former New York City Mayor and billionaire Michael Bloomberg, who has risen in the polls in recent months after doling out over $300 million for television ads in states voting on Super Tuesday, has faced tremendous backlash from opponents in his own party and President Trump, accusing him of trying to buy the White House. Forty percent of voters claimed to have reservations/are very uncomfortable with a candidate who is younger than 40, which the youngest contender, former Mayor Pete Buttigieg of South Bend, Ind., is at 38 years old. He is also openly gay and married, a fact that makes 27 percent of all voters very uncomfortable, the poll said. Several women have made strong surges in the crowded Democratic battlefield, particularly Warren and Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., but 14 percent of voters say they are bothered by a candidate who is female. When identified by name, 47 percent of all voters say they are “very uncomfortable” with Trump on the ballot in 2020; 44 percent say the same about Sanders; 41 percent say that about Warren; and 39 percent say so about Biden.

The big takeaway from this poll is that a majority of voters (67%) are “uncomfortable” with the label of “socialist.”  That bodes very well for Trump.  Another factor was age, and Bernie is the oldest at 78.  He’d be 79 if he were to be sworn in, and voters know this.  So, while many don’t like Trumps crazy Tweets and such, it looks like many would look past that when compared against Bernie’s age and socialist policies.  Of course he’s not the nominee yet, and anything can happen in the next 8+ months before the election.  But, again, this is probably welcome news to the Trump campaign.

Gutfeld on socialism and the Dem candidates

You remember Friday night’s Democratic debate? Yeah, me neither. The high point? When a moderator asked, “Is anyone … on this stage concerned about having a Democratic socialist at the top of the Democratic ticket?” Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., was the only one who raised her hand. (We don’t count Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt.). It says something good about her, and something frightening about the rest. She thinks for herself as the rest cower before the fringe. The sad thing about this crop? You’re grateful to see even a grain of common sense. Apparently, voicing disgust over an ideological menace that helped to kill millions is now an act of blasphemy. What a mess. Former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg is a thesaurus without specifics. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., is an evasive phony. Former Vice President Joe Biden sounded like a guy at the bar after he got fired, talking loudly about all the stuff he did better than everyone else. It’s also bad when Democrats say they wouldn’t kill a terrorist. Who are they worried about pissing off? Terrorists? Oddly, they seem more spiteful of companies, which are just made up of people. However, lacking economic skills, Democrats think companies are sinister engines run by the “Monopoly” guy who wears a top hat. They plead for unity while slamming folks who were once examples of American opportunity. As the economy rolls on, with more jobs, wages and satisfaction, they accuse half the country of exploiting the other half. So now, reasonable Democrats have become the fringe, while others parrot the line that America is racist, leading to divisive factions and punitive actions. They deny real progress with race, which puts future progress in jeopardy. How do you measure change when you reject its existence? Amy’s at least rooted in some reality. Which means she’s toast.

Oh, let’s not get crazy, Greg.   But yeah…it’s unlikely she’ll be the Dem nominee.  Gotta  love Greg’s style. Greg Gutfeld currently serves as host of FOX News Channel’s (FNC) The Greg Gutfeld Show (Saturdays 10-11PM/ET) and co-host of The Five (weekdays 5-6PM/ET).

Analysis: Them the People

Iain Murray grew up reading and writing by candlelight, not because he lived in premodern times but because he lived under democratic socialism. Senator Bernie Sanders of Vermont and other contemporary American advocates of democratic socialism lean heavily on the democratic part, which is at least in part a matter of marketing. To take their talk of democratic principle seriously requires forgetfulness and credulousness: During the last great uprising of democratic socialism in the English-speaking world — in the United Kingdom in the 1970s, where young Iain Murray, now a fellow at the Competitive Enterprise Institute, was doing his homework by the light of coals and candles — the so-called democratic socialists embraced democracy when it suited them and anti-democratic, illiberal, and at times murderous modes of government when those suited their political agenda better, with left-wing activists such as young Jeremy Corbyn acting as tireless apologists for the Soviet Union, its purges and its gulags. In the United States, Noam Chomsky dismissed reports of Pol Pot’s genocide as right-wing propaganda; later, young Bernie Sanders and his new bride would honeymoon in the Soviet Union even as the Communist Party bosses were creating a new and more modern gestapo to put down democrats and dissidents. History counsels us to consider the first adjective in “democratic socialist” with some skepticism. But the socialism that reduced the United Kingdom from world power to intermittently pre-industrial backwater in the post-war era was thoroughly democratic. The policies that turned the lights out in London were not imposed on the British people by a repressive junta. And that is part of the problem with democratic socialism even as notionally presented by Sanders et al.: It is both of those things. In the United States, we use the word “democratic” as though it were a synonym for “decent” or “accountable,” but 51 percent of the people can wreck a country just as easily and as thoroughly as 10 percent of them. That is why the United States has a Bill of Rights and other limitations on democratic power. The United Kingdom, having a parliamentary form of government, does not enjoy such formal protections. A British government with an electoral mandate can run wild, as it did under the democratic-socialist governments of the post-war era, climaxing in the “Winter of Discontent” in 1978–79. “I grew up in the north of England,” Murray says. “It gets dark very early in the winters there.” A series of strikes by government unions left the United Kingdom without trash collectors, and garbage piled up in the streets; there were shortages of food and fuel as strikes crippled the transportation system; medical workers in the country’s monopoly national health-care system went on strike, with nurses, orderlies, and hospital staff abandoning their posts and leaving sick Britons with nowhere to turn for medical attention; the bodies of those who died piled up for months, because the gravediggers’ union was on strike, too; eventually, the interruptions of fuel and labor caused the electrical system to fail. Hence the candles. This wasn’t the first time: In 1970, a similar labor action had forced Britain’s hospitals to operate by candlelight. Think about that: A year after Americans had landed on the moon, Englishmen were undergoing medical procedures under neo-medieval conditions, in a medical world lit only by fire. This did not happen in Joseph Stalin’s Soviet Union, in Kim Jong-il’s North Korea, in Chairman Mao’s China, or in Fidel Castro’s Cuba. This happened in England, within living memory, only 41 years ago. Bernie Sanders was pushing 40 — old enough to remember, just as he is today old enough to know better. The problems of socialism are problems of socialism — problems related to the absence of markets, innovation, and free enterprise and, principally, problems related to the epistemic impossibility of the socialist promise: rational central planning of economic activity. The problems of socialism are not the problems of authoritarianism and will not be cured by democracy. Socialism and authoritarianism often go hand in hand (almost always, in fact), but socialism on its own, even when it is the result of democratic elections and genuinely democratic processes, is a bottomless well of misery. The Soviet gulags and hunger-genocide, the Chinese prison camps, and the psychosis of Pyongyang are not the only exhibits in the case against socialism, and the case against socialism is also the case against democratic socialism, as the experience of the United Kingdom attests. Murray, talking about his forthcoming book The Socialist Temptation at a CEI event in New Orleans, describes the inherent tension within democratic socialism. “The tyranny of the majority means you have no rights,” he says. “Early democratic societies realized that you had to have rights; how extensive those rights are is normally determined by how powerful the democracy is — one reason why the United States had such an extensive bill of rights so early is because the democracy was quite powerful. Socialists coopt the language of rights by introducing positive rights rather than negative rights — they will speak of the right to a job or the right to housing — but not the right to be left alone, which inherently contradicts democratic socialism.” The destructive nature of socialism comes not from its tendency to trample on democracy (though socialism often does trample on democracy) but from its total disregard for rights — rights that are, in the context of the United States and other liberal-democratic systems, beyond the reach of mere majorities. We have the Bill of Rights to protect freedom of speech, freedom of the press, the free exercise of religion, etc., not because we expect that majorities will reliably support and protect these rights but because we expect that majorities will be hostile to them. Hence the stupidity of complaints about our commitment to free speech protecting speech that is offensive, divisive, extreme, etc.: That’s precisely the point of the First Amendment — the other kind of speech doesn’t need protecting, because it is unobjectionable. Other rights — property rights and the right to trade prominent among them — also find themselves on the wrong side of majorities, constantly and predictably. But they are no less fundamental than the right to free speech, and they are no less necessary for a thriving and prosperous society. Socialism destroys societies by gutting or diminishing those rights. Doing so with the blessing of 50 percent plus one of the population does not make that any less immoral or any less corrosive. Conservatives understand the case against socialism. But in a moment of ascendant populism, making the case for keeping democracy in a very small box — recognizing the difference between useful democratic procedures and a more general majoritarian democratic ethos — can be difficult. Those who have made a cult of “We the People” have left themselves without a very plausible moral or political basis for telling Them the People to go jump in a lake when they demand immoral and destructive policies. But it was the people who ruined the United Kingdom with socialism in the 1970s, and it is the people who threaten to do the same thing to these United States today.

Thanks to Kevin D. Williamson for that sobering, yet enlightening piece on the dangers and evils of socialism.  Keep this in mind the next time you hear Bernie or AOC use the term “democratic socialism.”  Please consider this your “Read of the Day.”  If you read only one article here at The Daily Buzz, then READ THIS!!  Then, forward it on to your family and friends; especially those who are feeling the Bern, or are Democrats and get their news from the dominantly liberal mainstream media (i.e. the NY Times, The Washington Post, ABC, CBS, NBC, CNN, NPR/PBS, and the worst…MSNBC, etc).

AOC: ‘No one ever makes a billion dollars. You take a billion dollars’

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., said that “no one ever makes a billion dollars. You take a billion dollars” during a Martin Luther King Jr. Day discussion with author Ta-Nehisi Coates on Monday. “No one ever makes a billion dollars. You take a billion dollars,” Ocasio-Cortez said, receiving applause. “I’m not here to villainize and to say billionaires are inherently morally corrupt. … It’s to say that this system that we live in, life in capitalism always ends in billionaires.” Ocasio-Cortez said billionaires make their money “off the backs” of “undocumented people,” “black and brown people being paid under a living wage” and “single mothers.” She addressed a hypothetical “widget” billionaire in her remarks. “You didn’t make those widgets, did you? Because you employed thousands of people and paid them less than a living wage to make those widgets for you,” Ocasio-Cortez said. “You didn’t make those widgets. You sat on a couch while thousands of people were paid modern-day slave wages, and in some cases real modern-day slavery.” Ocasio-Cortez, who advocates for democratic socialism, is not the only Democrat in Washington, D.C., honing in on billionaires these days. Ocasio-Cortez joined in on presidential candidate Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s criticism of JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon in November by saying he’s a billionaire “asking for a safe space” amid Democrats’ desire for economic disruption. “Y’all, the billionaires are asking for a safe space — you know, in addition to the entire US economy and political lobbying industry,” Ocasio-Cortez wrote on Twitter. Ocasio-Cortez’s tweet included a link to a news article about Dimon responding to Warren’s criticism by claiming she “vilifies successful people.” The Massachusetts senator frequently rails against the ultra-wealthy and has proposed a wealth tax to fund a number of sweeping plans, including Medicare-for-all, canceling student loan debt for the majority of Americans and providing universal child care, that she’s introduced.

AOC is a spectacularly stupid person.  She has no clue how wealth is created.  She thinks that there is this singular, finite pie of money, and if someone has money, then it must have been taken from that finite pie.  So, per her two-dimensional socialistic tendencies…that money must be redistributed.  After all, that’s only fair, right?  What a moron…  That said, she has, unfortunately, quite a following of millennials caught up in the whole “socialism is cool” thing, and that’s dangerous for all of us.  The only way to combat that is for each of us to get the facts out about the failures of socialism.  We have the #1 economy on the planet.  It’s not even close.  And, that is because of capitalism; that thing AOC and Bernie all think is evil…as they personally, and brazenly, hypocritically benefit from it.

Greg Gutfeld: Sanders campaign staff wage complaints expose ‘socialist millionaire’ as ‘hypocrite’

Democratic presidential candidate Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., routinely slams corporate executives and makes calls for wage hikes, a stance that comes across as hypocritical thanks to a new report, according to Greg Gutfeld. The self-described democratic socialist is reportedly taking heat from campaign staffers upset they are being paid “poverty wages” and not the $15 per hour that is a hallmark of the Sanders campaign, Gutfeld claimed Friday on “The Five.” “He is, just by existing, a hypocrite,” he said. “He’s a socialist millionaire with three homes. Wealth is good for him but not for others.” Sanders reportedly has a net worth of about $700,000, but has made more than $1 million annually in recent years. He and his wife Jane own a house in Burlington, Vt., he purchased a $575,000 lakefront property in the Green Mountain State in 2016, and the couple owns a 19th-century townhouse in the District of Columbia. On “The Five,” Gutfeld said it is important that Sanders, “appl[y] the damaging policies that he wants to do to Americans onto his staff.” “But why won’t he?” he asked. “Because he knows when you raise wages… you have to reduce the number of jobs because ‘the pie’ doesn’t grow. “The purpose of the minimum wage is it’s the first rung on the employment ladder. The problem with the left is… they see the first rung as the last rung because they’re not economically competent.” In recent weeks, Sanders has called for a $15 per hour minimum wage on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” and at campaign rallies in Rock Hill, S.C. and in Augusta, Ga. Adding to Gutfeld’s remarks, host Juan Williams claimed the wages Sanders staffers are making average out to $13 per hour. The staff is also unionized, Williams said.

Greg is definitely right..  Regardless of your personal politics, or party affiliation, Bernie is clearly a spectacular hypocrite.  But, then again, so are most socialist leaders.  They’ll want to impose their failed economic/political system on everyone, but themselves.  Socialism keeps people in mediocrity, except those at the very top who are millionaires (some even billionaires) with multiple mansions and so on.  And, that’s been true throughout history.  Bernie is just the most glaring, brazen example in American politics.  Kudos to Greg for calling out that self-righteous hypocrite on his bs.  For more, click on the text above.