Social Media

Gutfeld on tweeting while wasted

A new study by New York University finds that a third of the people who get high post on social media while under the influence. And a large portion said they regretted their intoxicated actions. I like this study because I am this study. Many times I would tweet something rude after that third glass of wine. And the next day, regret the tweet, not the wine. I learned over time that I had to cut back on one or the other. So out went the wine, in came the vodka. But we’re missing the good news. The study isn’t about the destruction caused behind the wheel of a car — it’s now about the embarrassment caused in front of your smartphone screen. Wikipedia told me that between 1991 and 2017, the rate of drunk driving fatalities has decreased 46 percent nationally, and 68 percent among those under age 21. So we find ourselves no longer steering into lamp posts; instead we steer humiliating posts about our stupid thoughts, activities and selves into a ravenous public, who happily seek another opportunity to dance on our shame. Writer P.J. O’Rourke once called booze “liquid idiot,” but our tweets are “digital dumb.” Which is better? Nobody ever drove a tweet into oncoming traffic and wiped out a family of five. So consider it progress that more people are dying from embarrassment than internal injuries. If more high people are wrecking themselves online than on the road, that’s a win for all of us. We should all drink to that. In moderation, of course! And certainly not near Twitter.

Well said, Greg!  That was adapted from Greg Gutfeld’s monologue on “The Five” on Aug. 19, 2019. Greg Gutfeld currently serves as host of FOX News Channel’s (FNC) The Greg Gutfeld Show (Saturdays 10-11PM/ET) and co-host of The Five (weekdays 5-6PM/ET).  Excellent!!    🙂

Alex Jones, InfoWars, ‘permanently suspended’ by Twitter

Twitter announced Thursday that it “permanently suspended” Alex Jones and his show InfoWars from their platform, as well as Periscope. The announcement came via tweet from Twitter Safety, who said the decision was made “based on new reports of Tweets and videos posted yesterday that violate our abusive behavior policy, in addition to the accounts’ past violations.” It wasn’t immediately clear which tweets and videos Twitter was referring to. Jones, who has spread conspiracy theories about the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting, has previously been banned from sites like Facebook and YouTube for violations of their terms of service. Facebook said it had removed four pages related to InfoWars for violating hate speech and bullying policies. Jones claims he is being politically targeted. In follow-up tweets, Twitter said they “wanted to be open about this action” due to public interest. “As we continue to increase transparency around our rules and enforcement actions, we wanted to be open about this action given the broad interest in this case. We do not typically comment on enforcement actions we take against individual accounts, for their privacy,” Twitter said. “We will continue to evaluate reports we receive regarding other accounts potentially associated with @realalexjones or @infowars and will take action if content that violates our rules is reported or if other accounts are utilized in an attempt to circumvent their ban.” Word of Jones’ fate on the social media platform came a day after he clashed with Florida Republican Sen. Marco Rubio after interrupting an interview. During Wednesday’s dust-up between Rubio and Jones, the lawmaker was recorded discussing with reporters his worries that China and other governments could demand social media platforms like Facebook and Twitter crackdown on dissidents. The conversation came prior to a Senate Intellgence Committe hearing. When Jones approached, he accused Democrats of “doing what you say China does” and said tech companies and Democrats are “purging” and shadow banning conservatives. The remarks led to an impassioned exchange of words between the pair, before Rubio ultimately went into the hearing.

Anyone who truly cares about free speech should be terrified after reading that.  Alex Jones isn’t the brightest bulb on the Christmas tree..and can be a complete tool.  The way he confronted Sen. Mario Rubio (R-FL) in the hall was obnoxious and low class…and that’s being nice.  But, Alex has just as much right to spout his conspiratorial nonsense, and obnoxiousness, as the next guy.  And, hey..  To be fair, every once in a rare while he, or his staff, uncover something actually newsworthy…worth actually reading.  In the interest of full disclosure, here at The Daily Buzz we’ve posted about a half dozen or so articles from the InfoWars site over the last 4.5 years we’ve been here.  Again, it’s been pretty rare.  But, it’s not about whether you agree with Alex, or anyone else for that matter.  It’s whether they have the right to voice their views like everyone else.  I mean c’mon..  We all have had to put up with idiots like Jerry Springer, and Maury, for decades.  How is this any different?  And,  while FaceBook and Twitter are private companies that have the right to censor anything they want..  They are also a bit of a monopoly on social media.  As such, Congress is taking a very hard look at social media and considering regulating them.  Also, it’s clear their platforms are not favorable to Republicans and conservatives.  So, there is that element as well which is another cause for concern. But, again, as it relates to Alex and InfoWars..  This is something that we should ALL be very concerned about, regardless of political party affiliation or persuasion…and not be so quick to cheer that Alex was shut down and censored.

 

Facebook scams are on the rise, new report says

The Better Business Bureau (BBB) is the latest to chime in with a recent alert about scammers who use Facebook Messenger to trick victims. In its Scam Tracker alert, the BBB said it has “received dozens of reports” about scammers using Facebook Messenger to promote phony grants. The key to the scam is the seeming familiarity of the sender: a friend, family or relative. The scammers often do two things, according to the BBB. They will either hack into your account or create a “lookalike profile” by stealing your photos and personal information. “Either way, scammers are banking that you will trust a message that appears to come from someone you know,” the BBB said. Echoing the BBB alert, this week, Beth Anne Steele with FBI’s Portland office wrote about a personal experience with Facebook messenger. In her post, Steele said that she got a message that looked like it came from a friend. The message included a video link that read: “Hey I saw this video. Isn’t this you?” She didn’t click on the link but was contacted the next day by the friend who said the scammers had hacked his account and that the link contained a virus. There are variations on these friend-and-family scams on Twitter and other social networks. On Twitter, for example, a scammer will send you a tweet purportedly from a person you follow that uses phraseology such as “someone is saying bad things about you” or “someone is spreading rumors about you.” “Scammers use two rules of thumb to lure victims. The first is to gain the confidence of their target through lent credibility…a friend, authority figure, or organization that the victim is likely to trust. The second rule of thumb scammers use is to create a sense of urgency; they want you to act now,” James Lerud, head of the behavioral research team at cybersecurity firm Verodin, said..

Just another reason I don’t use FB..  For more, click on the above..

Facebook flags Declaration of Independence as hate speech

In the week of America’s Independence Day, the algorithms of Facebook decided that the Declaration of Independence was hate speech. The Liberty County Vindicator, a community newspaper between Houston and Beaumont, had been posting the whole declaration in small daily chunks for nine days on its Facebook page in the run-up to July 4. But the 10th excerpt was not posted Monday as scheduled, and the paper said it received an automated notice saying the post “goes against our standards on hate speech.” Part of the standard notice, Vindicator managing editor Casey Stinnett wrote, included a warning that the newspaper could lose its Facebook account, on which it depends for much of its reach, if there were more violations. The offending passage? It was part of the document’s “Bill of Particulars” against Britain’s King George III: “He has excited domestic insurrections amongst us, and has endeavoured to bring on the inhabitants of our frontiers, the merciless Indian Savages, whose known rule of warfare, is an undistinguished destruction of all ages, sexes and conditions.” Mr. Stinnett dryly replied in an article about the rejection, “Perhaps had Thomas Jefferson written it as ‘Native Americans at a challenging stage of cultural development’ that would have been better. Unfortunately, Jefferson, like most British colonists of his day, did not hold an entirely friendly view of Native Americans.” He noted that the newspaper wanted “a means of contacting Facebook for an explanation or a opportunity to appeal the post’s removal, but it does not appear the folks at Facebook want anyone contacting them. Or, at least, they do not make it easy.” Within a day, Facebook had paid heed, allowing the posting and sending the Vindicator an apology. “It looks like we made a mistake and removed something you posted on Facebook that didn’t go against our Community Standards. We want to apologize and let you know that we’ve restored your content and removed any blocks on your account related to this incorrect action,” Facebook wrote back, the Vindicator reported. Reason magazine pointed out how Facebook’s actions were “silly” but also the inevitable logic of massive social-media sites trying to police millions of messages, a task that cannot be done by humans. “They demonstrate a problem with automated enforcement of hate speech policies, which is that a robot trained to spot politically incorrect language isn’t smart enough to detect when that language is part of a historically significant document,” wrote Christian Britschgi, an assistant editor at the libertarian magazine.

You really can’t make this stuff up, folks..

Madison, WI schools block social media access for students

The Madison, Wisconsin school district is blocking students’ access to social media sites at several schools during the school day as part of a pilot project aimed at reengaging students. School officials at East High School and Wright and Cherokee Middle Schools killed access to Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and dozens of other social media sites on May 1, and West High School followed suit on Monday. The plan is to track students at the schools through the end of the year to determine if the change made any impact on student behavior, academics, and school safety, the Wisconsin State Journal reports. “Our students who are the most disengaged are typically the ones who are stuck on their phones and walking the halls with their heads down,” East High School Principal Mike Hernandez said. “I call it the zombie walk, and unfortunately it can lead to students making poor choices on social media with Instagram and Facebook Live.” The reaction from students and parents is mixed, with some recognizing the need to crack down on bullying that often takes place online and others who believe the censorship goes too far, Fox 61 reports. “A few students and a few adults have come to me and said, ‘What you’re doing is wrong,’” Hernandez said. “Some questioned whether we shouldn’t be more about teaching how to use the Internet responsibly. “And yes, but it’s a two-way street,” he said. “We also have to make sure they understand algebra.” The social media blackouts will apply to each school’s free WiFi service, but will not block access to sites accessed through personal cellular data plans.

Sooo… Any whining is bs.  We applaud this Madison, WI school district for doing this.  Kids need to be focused on their school work; NOT FaceBook, Twitter, Instagram and the rest of them.

‘Dear valid LinkedIn user’: Don’t fall for this phishing scam

Another day, another phishing scam. LinkedIn, which hasn’t always had the best security to begin with, may be the delivery method for a curious email message that’s been going around. Like most phishing attempts, it claims to represent a popular social media site and asks for login information. Unlike other scams, though, the link it provides doesn’t actually go anywhere (it may have been removed by LinkedIn). It’s not clear whether the scam’s goal is to steal your login credentials, infect your system with malware or lure you into paying for useless tech support , making the threat pretty mild — for now. A staffer at Tom’s Guide received an email message entitled “Important User Alert” from “linkedIn.customerservices.us1@fsr.net”. Even casual users will notice right away that this is not a legitimate LinkedIn email address. Rather, FSR is a Moscow, Idaho-based Internet provider, not really notable for anything other than the fact that it’s decidedly not LinkedIn. The “LinkedIn” username is pure fabrication. “Dear Valid LinkedIn User,” the e-mail begins, and this should be your second tip-off that the message is a scam. The real LinkedIn is aware of your real name and can address messages to you personally. The email continues with errant capitalization on “Important Message” and questionable grammar: “Our system indicates your account signed-on from different IP recently, do not panic, this happens mostly when your ISP provider changes the IP without your knowledge, but we advise you kindly follow up by Updating to the system to enable auto unflag,” and so on, and so forth, in an incredibly grating run-on sentence. One need not be very internet-savvy to presume that LinkedIn employs better copywriters than this. The email warns that users could lose their LinkedIn privileges unless they click on a suspicious link, but that’s where two unusual things happen. First off, the URL appears to lead to an actual LinkedIn address, complete with the site’s secured HTTPS server. Second, there’s nothing there. The site is completely blank and thus, for the moment, apparently harmless. Generally speaking, links like this lead to shady copies of legitimate websites that ask for, then catalog, usernames and passwords. There are a few possibilities for why there’s nothing at the URL. The site could simply be unfinished, but it’s possible that the scammers sent out an incorrect link (they would hardly be the first cybercriminals dumb enough to do so). The fact that the page appears to be hosted on the real LinkedIn website is also interesting, but not necessarily shocking; users can create their own blog posts and pages, so it would not take a very daring criminal to make a malicious LinkedIn page. It’s eminently possible that LinkedIn, now owned by Microsoft, already discovered the page and shut it down. The lesson here is the same as always: Don’t click on links in strange emails, and make sure to verify sender addresses in incoming messages to ensure you don’t wind up giving away your login information to scammers. The page doesn’t work this time, but there are much smarter tricksters out there.

Indeed..

Hate Hoax: Maryland Black teen Posts ‘KKK’ Twitter Threat

A 14-year-old student allegedly hoaxed a Twitter threat from a social media account that she claimed was the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). The teenager has been charged by the Anne Arundel County Police Department with a juvenile citation after she allegedly tweeted out “We’re planning to attack tomorrow” from a Twitter account police say she created, named “@KoolkidsKlanKkk,” according to CBS Baltimore. Anne Arundel police said they worked with Twitter to find the identity of the individual who sent out the threatening message, ultimately leading them to the 14-year-old African-American student. Police officials have interviewed the teenager, saying she admitted to creating the Twitter account and sending the threatening message. After being charged by police with a juvenile citation for allegedly disrupting school activities, the teenager was released to her parents. “I kind of felt unsafe at the school and a little hurt,” Arundel High School Freshman Taylor Nash told CBS Baltimore. Anne Arundel County Public Schools Superintendent George Arlotto said he was thankful police were able to identify the teenager who allegedly made the threat and Twitter account. “I want to thank Police Chief Tim Altomare, State’s Attorney Wes Adams, County Executive Steve Schuh, and their staffs for their thorough and expeditious work to identify a suspect in the online post that threatened violence at Arundel High School this week,” Arlotto said in the statement. “The anonymity of the internet provides a murky and complex disguise for many who want to threaten the safety and security of our communities.” “Our partners in the Police Department and county government peeled back that disguise quickly in this case, in the process reassuring parents, students, and staff that our schools are safe places in which to educate our children,” Arlotto continued.

Indeed..  This was just another hate hoax.  Thankfully it was resolved appropriately.  The kid was caught by police, issued a citation and turned over to he parents.  I’m usre they’re full of pride.  Perhaps this young girl should read Ann Coulter’s advice to hate hoaxers (scroll down 10 articles).  Unreal..