Republican politics

Bill Bennett: The GOP lost the House – Here’s how they can get it back (plus, my advice for Democrats)

The forecast for Tuesday’s midterm elections called for a blue wave to crash on our shores. What occurred was more of a steady, light blue rain. What happened? The Republicans lost the House by a comparatively small margin and gained firmer control of the Senate. Specifically, with some close races still undecided, Democrats have picked up at least 29 seats in the House. Republicans have picked up at least one seat in the Senate, with races in Arizona and Mississippi remaining undecided. By comparison to the 29-seat loss suffered Tuesday by President Trump’s Republican Party, President Obama’s Democratic Party lost 63 seats in the in 2010 midterm elections. In fact, the incumbent president’s party has lost an average of 37 seats in midterm elections since WWII. While it’s typical for the president’s party to lose seats in the House in midterms, it’s highly unusual for the president’s party to gain seats in the Senate in the same election. It’s only happened three times in the past 104 years – in 1914, 1962 and 1970. Four Senate Democrats lost elections Tuesday after voting against the confirmation of now-Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. Their seats in Missouri, Indiana, North Dakota and Florida went to the GOP (however, in Florida Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson has not conceded and is seeking a recount in his Senate race against Republican Gov. Rick Scott). What’s more, Sen. Joe Manchin, D-W.Va., won re-election Tuesday after voting to confirm Kavanaugh. This could signal that voters saw the Kavanaugh hearings for what they were: a farce and an outrage committed by Democrats. This consequential mistake by the Democrats will endure. In the states of Texas, Florida and Georgia white women supported Republican candidates for the U.S. Senate and for governor. Some 59 percent supported GOP Sen. Ted Cruz in Texas, 51 percent supported the Republican candidate for governor Ron DeSantis in Florida, and 76 percent voted for the Republican candidate for governor Brian Kemp in Georgia. Despite the far left’s groundswell for women to rebuke the Republican “patriarchy,” this demographic had a strong turnout in red states for the GOP. Republicans won governor races in the traditionally blue states of Vermont, Massachusetts, and Maryland. Voters are demonstrating a willingness to consider issues and candidates more thoroughly at the state level, not just their own registered party. Democrats saw wins come in for more moderate candidates. Rep. Conor Lamb, D-Pa., was re-elected to the House. Lamb champions bipartisanship and focuses on his legislative agenda, rather than on antagonizing President Trump. In addition, Lamb has resisted endorsing House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., for speaker of the House. Also, four Democrats who are military veterans won House seats. Exit polls show President Trump’s national approval rating at 44 percent. But in states where it mattered most for Senate races, he had higher support. Exit polls also show the primary issues for voters were health care at 41 percent, immigration following at 23 percent and the economy at 21 percent. What does this tell us moving forward? Democrats are seeing increased support for moderate candidates. However, the party leadership, with the celebration of the media, often positions itself on the far left. Will the Democrats embrace a migration towards the middle or undervalue this winning trend at their own peril? On the other side, the GOP at long last needs to work diligently toward an alternative to the Affordable Care Act, since health care was the biggest issue at the polls. Republicans must also loudly promote their success with two of the country’s most enduring, important issues: the economy and national security. For many Americans, strength in these two areas is substantially more important than anything else that influences their vote. They need to be reminded why. Despite the advertisement of a fierce blue wave from the left, President Trump and the GOP weathered the steady light rain quite well. The midterm elections were supposed to be a referendum on the president. The polls suggest a more nuanced response from the voters.

Excellent post-election assessment by Bill.  William J. Bennett was the former Sec. of Education under President Reagan, and is the author of the “Book of Virtues. “

RNC Chair Ronna McDaniel Asked to Serve Second Term

The job of Republican National Committee (RNC) Chair is Ronna McDaniel’s for another two years if she is up for it. President Donald Trump has asked the high-ranking party official to serve a second term amid a stellar fundraising haul for the 2018 midterm elections, according to a Sunday Axios report. Axios co-founder Mike Allen writes that President Trump is thrilled with McDaniel’s “work on behalf of the America First agenda, effective management of the party infrastructure, and record grassroots engagement and fundraising.” President Trump’s offer comes after the RNC’s August filings showed the party raised $16.4 million for the month, bringing this cyle’s total to a whopping $252 million. “Enthusiasm for President Trump and his successful agenda is fueling our record-breaking fundraising and energizing our grassroots supporters,” McDaniel told The Hill of the record-breaking fundraising haul. With the midterm elections just 22 days away, McDaniel says Republican voters are “completely energized” following a successfully hard-fought battle to confirm Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh. “The generic ballot has narrowed from double digits. Now it’s at seven. I’m looking at every race across the country,” the RNC chair told Fox News host Chris Wallace last Sunday. “We have about 30 that are in the margin of error, certainly in districts where Hillary Clinton won where we have Republican incumbents. Our job is to turn out our base first. Our base is completely energized right now. The Kavanaugh hearings have just highlighted how important this election is for them.” McDaniel, the niece of failed presidential candidate Mitt Romney, was elected RNC chair in January 2017, replacing Reince Priebus, who exited the role to serve as President Trump’s Chief of Staff. Previously, McDaniel assumed the role of Michigan Republican Party Chair in February 2015.

Poll: DACA Amnesty Bombs In GOP Primaries

A DACA amnesty is strongly opposed by the Republicans who vote in GOP primaries, says a new poll by Americans for Legal Immigration PAC. The group is touring Capitol Hill offices today to showcase the poll, which they say will deter GOP legislators from backing a DACA or ‘dreamer’ amnesty prior to their Spring primaries. “We’re hoping this poll will be a bucket of cold water to wake them out of their DC spell,” said William Gheen, founder of ALIPAC. The group plans to visit the at least 200 offices of GOP politicians, including North Carolina Sen. Thom Tillis, Maine Sen. Susan Collins, House Speaker Paul Ryan, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, and Arkansas Sen. Tom Cotton. “If Collins and Ryan and Mitch McConnell and the other amnesty supporting RINOS want to go against the will of their primary voters, like [Majority Leader Rep. Eric] Cantor did, that’s up to them,” Gheen said. Cantor lost his primary election in June 2014, largely because of primary opposition to an amnesty push in Congress. The poll results mean that pro-amnesty GOP legislators “are highly vulnerable and can be defeated by [primary] candidates with less experience and less money,” he said. GOP legislators should poll their own voters, he said, adding “they’ll back off the [amnesty] deal if they want to keep their jobs.”

Agreed!!  To see the results from this poll, and read the rest of this article, click on the text above.

Opinion/Analysis: The truth (and good news) about Roy Moore’s loss in the Alabama

Roy Moore, the Republican defeated Tuesday in the U.S. Senate race in Alabama, turned out to be a deeply flawed candidate and one who traditional Republican voters – including people of faith and suburban men and women – could neither muster enthusiasm for nor support. Moore had a well-established track record for controversy, low approval numbers in polls and was portrayed in the media as a dirty old man at best and a pedophile at worst. So his election loss should not come as a big surprise. If there is any small comfort to be found in Tuesday night’s results, it’s that Democrats can’t hang Roy Moore around Republicans’ necks — or Trump’s for that matter — in 2018. Moore drew so much opposition for some of his extreme positions and sexual misconduct allegations, it would be wrong to read his narrow defeat as a repudiation of President Trump or the Trump agenda. And the victory of Democrat Doug Jones does not signal that Democrats have solved their own deep-seated problems and are about to capture control of the House and Senate in the 2018 midterm elections. That’s wishful thinking by Democratic partisans – not a sober assessment. The sexual misconduct allegations against Moore surfaced at the worst possible time – as the country was engulfed in a flood of such allegations against prominent men in politics, the entertainment industry, journalism and other sectors. On top of this, the mainstream media worked hard to make the Alabama Senate election a referendum on President Trump, on Steve Bannon and on the future of the GOP in an effort to hurt the president and the Republican Party with Moore’s unpopularity, arising out of his alleged sexual misconduct. Let’s be clear. To be sure, Republicans in Congress have issues. They have failed thus far to follow through on a single Trump campaign legislative promise: no immigration reform, no border security, no repeal and replace of ObamaCare, no tax reform (though that appears in the offing), no overhaul of the Deep State that is throwing sand into the regulatory reform gears at every turn. If the Republican Party fails to show results when it controls both ends of Pennsylvania Avenue, there will be hell to pay at the ballot box in 2018, no doubt about it. But Republican losses for the governorship of Virginia and in the special election for a Senate seat from Alabama were each unique for different reasons. Virginia has been trending Democratic for almost two decades, especially in areas where turnout will always be greater than in rural parts of the state. And the Republican candidate for governor did not fully embrace President Trump. And Alabama? Well, count the ways this election went off the rails: no clear, consensus candidate who all Republicans could support after a bitter primary; a concerted effort by the national media and Democrats nationally targeting Moore for defeat; and Moore’s many self-inflicted and politically concocted wounds. When President Trump has been invited in to campaign for a Republican candidate, where his message is welcomed and received, and where the candidate and President Trump are aligned, good things have happened. But bad things happen – as took place in Alabama – when the president and the candidate have been opposed by the Republican establishment. At some point, unless the establishment GOP desires to spend decades in the wilderness of not controlling Congress, the Republican National Committee and leaders in Congress must begin to align their efforts with the Trump White House. Find the candidates who are great advocates for a stronger, more prosperous, America First agenda and who are good campaigners able to draw voters from across the political spectrum. This year is ending with strong economic numbers, solid optimism among the public for a brighter future, and a president who deserve the credit for much of it – despite incessant attacks from the anti-Trump media. The Trump agenda – where it has been allowed to take hold – is working. The Moore-Jones race wasn’t about the message, which never really got through. It was about the flawed messenger and a war of attrition over personal scandal. That’s not an agenda that Democrats can duplicate across the country, even though they are not above trying to do so. And its certainly a lesson Republicans can learn from.

Well said, Ned!  The author of that piece was Ned Ryun; the Founder and CEO of American Majority.  Excellent!

Former Rep. Tom Tancredo to Run for Governor of Colorado

Former Congressman Tom Tancredo (R-CO), a strong advocate against illegal immigration, will reportedly run for Colorado gubernatorial election in 2018. Tancredo decided to enter the race for governor after a private poll revealed that he had a wide lead over other potential Republican candidates. The survey also revealed that Tancredo has a statistical tie with Democratic candidate Rep. Jared Polis (D-CO). Tancredo told Colorado Politics on Monday, “I think that all of the things we need to do in the state of Colorado really require some bold leadership. It will not be easy to get some real change here, but I think I can provide that kind of leadership. I’m not afraid of taking on tough issues and being bold.” Tancredo explained that difficult issues facing Colorado families include roads, gun rights, education, sanctuary cities, energy, and economic growth. Tancredo was a prominent critic of illegal immigration during the Bush administration. The Republican gubernatorial candidate believes that the Republican establishment tanked his chances of winning the Colorado gubernatorial primary in 2014 after a wave of negative ads from the Republican Governor Association tanked his standing in the polls. “We have to anticipate what the establishment will do. It could get ugly. I think there is a swamp here,” Tancredo admitted. Tancredo had discussed whether he should run with conservative groups since August. “I keep asking the same question — ‘Do you think I can beat (Polis)? Do you think I’m the guy who can do it?’” Tancredo said. “So far, it looks like I have a chance.” Tancredo added, “I am so mad at the Republicans who are presently in office or in the hunt for not speaking out in defense of free speech that it won’t take much to push me over the line.”

Yes!!  We’re thrilled that former Congressman Tom Tancredo (R-CO) is seriously considering another run for Governor here in the great state of Colorado!!  In the interest of disclosure, and as many of you know, I’ve had the pleasure of knowing Tom on a personal level for many years.  He is the one who turned me on to “The Clash of Civilizations..,” and other writings, by Samuel P. Huntington.  Tom is a great guy who thinks outside the box and would be a breath of fresh, albeit feisty, air in the governor’s mansion.  We, of course, will keep a close eye on this developing story.    🙂

Kasich: Trump, Bannon Agenda ‘Is Not What’ the Republican ‘Party Is’

Sunday on NBC’s “Meet the Press,” Gov. John Kasich (R-Ohio) said the executive chairman of Breitbart News Steve Bannon targeting Republican senators to help ensure President Donald Trump’s agenda was being moved forward is pushing policy that was “not what the party is.” Partial transcript as follows: TODD: There seems to be a massive battle inside this Republican party. Steve Bannon yesterday declared it a season of war against the Republican establishment, singling out people like Bob Corker in particular, and thought it was outrageous he cared to criticize the president. What do you make of what Steve Bannon is doing to the Republican party? KASICH: I was on a show not long ago saying I’m disappointed in the direction of the Republican party. They cannot be anti-trade or anti-immigrant. They just can’t walk away from increasing debt. The Republican party can’t go out and start grabbing people out of their homes who have been really good people living in this country and shipping them out of the country willy-nilly or taking away health care for millions of people. This is not what the party is. Look, I grew up in the Reagan era. Here’s what it was. It was sunny. It was positive, inclusive. It was a big tent, and there was room for everybody. Pro-growth, all the things that we really like. Connectivity, welcoming, that’s where this party needs to be. When we don’t head in that direction, I’m going to fight to push us in that direction.

I remember back when John Kasich was in Congress and was a positive advocate for balancing the federal budget.  Now, he’s just a disgruntled whiner, since he lost in the primaries to Trump.  So, he spends more and more time on liberal news outlets like CNN complaining about the direction of the Republican Party and hinting that he might leave.  What a sore loser!!  Last I checked, the stock market is through the roof, unemployment is at historic lows, and we’re rolling back the big government programs that Obama and hist fascist regime put in place.  Plus, take a good look at who Trump has nominated for federal judges.  John’s not only a sore loser..  He’s jealous.

Rush Limbaugh: Steve Bannon Is ‘Taking Over the Role of the Republican Party’

Conservative radio host Rush Limbaugh said this week that Breitbart News Executive Chairman and former White House Chief Strategist Steve Bannon is “taking over the role of the Republican Party” as he looks to support conservative challengers to establishment lawmakers in 2018. “I think what Bannon is doing is slowly but surely taking over the role of the Republican Party, and people joining Bannon are [doing the same],” he said Wednesday. “The Republican Party is obviously not with [President] Trump on balance — you have some in the House who are — but the Republican Party on balance is not with Trump.” Bannon was one of the main populist/nationalist voices in the Trump White House, fighting to keep Trump true to the “America First” platform which catapulted him into the Oval Office. Since Bannon’s departure, Trump appears to have been tempted by the establishment siren song coming from the donor class, GOP congressional leaders, and the “West Wing Democrats” on a number of issues, including DACA and Afghanistan. But the establishment was dealt a serious blow last month when Judge Roy Moore beat the establishment-backed Sen. Luther Strange (R-AL) in the Alabama Senate primary, despite Strange outspending Moore by as much as 10-1. This has led to widespread speculation in the media that Bannon-backed conservative candidates could pose a serious threat to establishment candidates in 2018. Limbaugh argued that this development comes as the Republican elite has cozied up with donors and Democrats while ignoring the voices of the people who voted them into office: ” Some people make an argument that there really isn’t a Republican Party left. I mean, there are people who call themselves that and they go out and raise money and they raise a lot. But whereas the party used to be known for one, two, or three very serious things, they’re not anymore. When the Republican Party joins the Democratic Party on things like amnesty for illegal immigrants — that’s not the Republican Party. The Republican Party ceases to exist in the area of immigration, for example.” Limbaugh went on to argue that Bannon and his allies are trying to keep the identity of the Republican Party alive as the Republicans in Congress are joining Democrats on “issue after issue.” “The Republican party is the fundraising arm of the House and the Senate and their lobbyist buddies — that’s who Bannon is running against,” he said. “They’re running against the Republican establishment is what’s going on and, in the process, becoming the Republican Party.”