President Trump

Terror Expert Compares Reaction to Trump’s Russia Efforts to Obama’s: ‘It’s Glaring Hypocrisy’

Former U.S. Army Special Forces member Jim Hanson said that the criticism President Trump is facing for meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin is hypocritical to what the Obama administration faced in 2012. Hanson, during an appearance on “Fox & Friends,” specifically called out former President Barack Obama’s hot mic incident with then-Russian President Dmitry Medvedev and the lax media reaction to it. Obama told Medvedev that after the 2012 election, he’d “have more flexibility.” The former U.S. president and Medvedev were talking about missile defense, Hanson added, saying that the world’s security was actually being put at risk. “The media at that point in time had nothing to say,” he said. “Now, President Trump wants to make a less-antagonistic relationship with the Russians … and all of a sudden it’s the worst thing that ever happened. It’s glaring hypocrisy.” Trump is set to meet with Putin on Monday in Helsinki, Finland. Hanson said that the entire stature of Obama’s foreign policy was “cringing capitulation.” “It was ‘America last,’” he said. “It ended up making the world a much more dangerous place.” Hanson also recalled the 2009 meeting between then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, during which Clinton presented Lavrov with a physical “reset” button to signify resetting relations with Russia. “Hillary walks into that meeting asking for nothing … she’s telling them ‘OK, you can have whatever you want from us,’” Hanson said.

The hypocrisy is indeed, breathtaking.  Thanks to former U.S. Army Special Forces member Jim Hanson for calling out the dominantly liberal mainstream media, and Democrat politicians, who are using today’s summit between President Trump and President Putin as an excuse to have another beat-up Trump session.  The rhetoric has been SO over the top, that it isn’t worth even paying attention to.

Trump supporters turn out in London a day after protests

Thousands of Trump supporters and right-wing activists took to the nation’s capital on Saturday — a day after anti-Trump protesters had dominated the city. While the displays of right-wing support were nowhere near as large as the enormous anti-Trump march that demanded the international media’s attention the day before, it was still a significant show of support for Trump from those eager to counter the claim that Trump had been unanimously rejected by Britons. The day started with a small pro-Trump rally outside the U.S. Embassy, featuring numerous red “MAGA” hats and U.S. and U.K. flags — as well as a few anti-Hillary Clinton shirts. Later, approximately 3,000 people turned out near Trafalgar Square to show their backing of Trump as well as jailed right-wing and anti-Islam activist Tommy Robinson. “Oh Tommy Tommy, Tommy Tommy Tommy Tommy Robinson,” the football chant for the activist thundered throughout the event. Robinson, the ex-leader of the English Defense League, was jailed for 13 months beginning earlier in May for contempt of court after being arrested filming outside a court in Leeds. His supporters have claimed that the law was applied unevenly and have expressed concern for his safety in prison, considering his history of criticizing Islam. A number of right-wing groups were present at the march, including Generation Identity — which calls itself a “European patriotic youth movement” — as well as a number of right-wing Western politicians. Controversial Dutch MP Geert Wilders made an address by video, while Rep. Paul Gosar, R-Ariz., spoke about the importance of free speech. The speeches were a blend of support for Trump, Robinson and also concerns about the danger of mass migration and the importance of national sovereignty. U.S. flags were again in abundance, as well as pro-Trump banners and placards reading “Britain Loves Trump.” “The rubbish that was spouted about Trump yesterday, it’s complete unjustified vitriol against him,” Robert Stevens, wearing a Trump T-shirt, said…

Didn’t hear about this yesterday, did ya?  It was not reported on MSNBC, CNN, ABC, CNBS, or NBC.  And, it was very briefly glossed over on Fox News.  For more, and to see a few pics of this pro-Trump rally in London yesterday, click on the text above.     🙂

Opinion/Analysis: Indictment arguments aside, Trump is right to meet with Putin

Calls by some Democrats in Congress for President Trump to cancel his Monday summit with Russian President Vladimir Putin – in response to the indictment Friday of 12 Russian intelligence officers accused of hacking emails of the Democratic Party and Hillary Clinton – make no sense. President Trump is wise to stick with his plans to meet with the Russian leader in Finland. White House press secretary Sarah Sanders confirmed Friday night that the summit will take place despite the indictments. President Trump agreed to the meeting with Putin not as a reward or endorsement for Russian interference in our 2016 presidential election, but because the meeting is in America’s national interest. Like it or not, Russia is a major nuclear power and the U.S. needs to maintain a relationship that will minimize conflicts between our two countries and advance U.S. foreign policy goals around the world. Similarly, when President Nixon began the process of normalization of relations with China that led to diplomatic recognition and trade with the communist nation he was under no illusions that China was a peace-loving democracy that posed no threat to U.S. interests. But President Nixon – like other presidents throughout our history – concluded that America must deal with nations with which we have adversarial relationships. Does anyone seriously think that President Franklin Roosevelt believed Soviet dictator Josef Stalin was a true friend bearing no ill will toward the U.S. when Roosevelt and Stalin formed an alliance to fight the Nazis in World War II? No one is talking now about Trump and Putin forming a military alliance – the two leaders just want to discuss issues of importance to both of our countries. The grand jury indictments Friday grew out of the investigation by Special Counsel Robert Muller of Russian election meddling and allegations that some people in the Trump campaign may have colluded with the Russians. Deputy White House Press Secretary Lindsay Walters said that the indictment did not make any allegations that the Trump campaign worked with the Russians to interfere with the U.S. election or that Russian interference influenced the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The 11-count indictment of the 12 Russians includes charges of conspiracy against the U.S., money laundering and attempts to hack into the computers of government agencies including state election boards. President Trump said earlier in the day Friday in England that he would again bring up the issue of Russian interference in the American election when he meets with Putin Monday, but said he expects Putin will stick with Russia’s position denying such interference ever took place. Our president is right – it’s unrealistic to expect he can force Putin to admit something Putin has long denied. It’s about time the two leaders met one-on-one. President Trump has sat down with Chinese president Xi Jinping twice for lengthy meetings, once in Florida and once in Beijing. And Trump just concluded a meeting with leaders of the other 28 NATO nations in Belgium and with British Prime Minister Theresa May in England. In fact, Trump has met with many leaders from around the world, both friendly and unfriendly since taking office, including North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un in June. The Russian Foreign Ministry issued a statement Friday saying there is no evidence that the 12 people indicted by Mueller are linked to Russian military intelligence and calling the indictments a “shameful farce” designed to “spoil the atmosphere before the Russian-American summit.” The Russians earlier blamed the U.S. political climate for holding up a summit, and they are right about that. Reporters and Democrats have whipped themselves into a frenzy with the false claim that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to swing the presidential election, and are ready to pounce on President Trump for even the hint of a “tilt” toward Putin. Presidents Putin and Trump certainly have plenty of issues to discuss on Monday besides Russia’s meddling in our 2016 election, even though that’s unquestionably an important and serious issue.

For more on this excellent op/ed by best-selling author Kenneth R. Timmerman, click on the text above.  Mr. Timmerman, who got his M.A. from Brown University,  is a former lecturer at the Joint Counter-Terrorism Training Academy.  If you haven’t read it yet, pick up a copy of his book “Preachers of Hate:  Islam and the War Against America.”  It is a must read.

Trump releases 16th wave of judicial nominations

The president nominated five federal district court judges and one circuit judge on Friday, continuing to fulfill his campaign promise to place conservative jurists on the federal bench. Eric D. Miller, a Seattle-based attorney and part-time law professor at the University of Washington, was tapped for the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. The nomination comes just three days after another one of Mr. Trump’s judicial nominees was confirmed to the 9th Circuit. In total, Mr. Trump has had 22 circuit court judges and 19 district court judges confirmed since he took office. The five district court nominees announced Friday include: Tessa M. Gorman for the Western District of Washington, Damon R. Leichty for the Northern District of Indiana, Kathleen M. O’Sullivan for the Western District of Washington, J. Nicholas Ranjan for the Western District of Pennsylvania and John Milton Young for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania.

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews Mocks Deplorables: Trump ‘Dog-Training These People’

MSNBC’s Hardball host Chris Matthews lambasted President Donald Trump on Tuesday for his criticism of NATO defense spending — and casually dropped the charge that Trump’s rallies are “dog training” for his heartland voters. Matthews accused Trump of being more critical of NATO’s defense spending budget than Russian aggression towards Europe before insulting attendees of his recent rally in Great Falls, Montana. “He is taking a Republican Party, a grassroots party that’s spent 60, 70 years leading the war in the Cold War, hating the Russians for all their aggressiveness in the world and taking over the countries on the border and being tyrannical the way they are now and he has those people cheering against Western Europe,” he said. “He’s dog-training these people.” Sahil Kapur, a national political reporter for Bloomberg, told Matthews that President Trump’s statements would have been met with scorn from conservatives if former President Barack Obama had uttered them. “I think President Trump is doing this on a level that would make a lot of Republicans nervous,” he speculated. Turning his attention to President Trump’s supporters, Matthews criticized rally attendees for cheering proposals aimed at giving NATO allies more responsibility of their own security concerns. “They’re not getting paid. They’re not running for anything. Those regular people that show up for a Trump rally are cheering the attacks on our European allies and cheering ‘give a chance to little Putin,’” he complained. Over breakfast in Brussels with NATO Secretary-General Jens Stoltenberg on Wednesday, President Trump lamented how the Nord Stream 2 gas pipeline may leave Germany and other European countries perilously dependent on Russia for its energy needs. “It is very sad when Germany makes a massive oil and gas deal with Russia, where we’re supposed to be guarding against Russia, and Germany goes and pays out billions and billions of dollars a year to Russia,” the President said. “We’re protecting Germany, we’re protecting France, we’re protecting all of these countries.” “We’re paying a lot of money to protect, this has been going on for decades… it’s very unfair to our country, it’s very unfair to our taxpayers… these countries need to step it up, not over a ten year period, but immediately,” he added. President Trump told NATO allies on Wednesday they should commit to increasing military spending from 2 percent to 4 percent of their GDP by 2024.

Chris Matthews, who suffers from “Trump Derangement Syndrome,” is a nauseating, extreme liberal, sanctimonious, hate-filled, piece of garbage.  He is the old-guard poster child of the meltdown that is happening at MSNBC, and the rest of the dominantly liberal mainstream media.  All he does is make ad hominem attacks on anyone who is a true conservative, Republican, or Trump supporter…and, of course, his pathological fixation on President Trump is beyond silly.  Trump was 100% right to demand that the other NATO member countries pay the 2% of their (infinitely smaller) GDP which they have agreed to contractually for decades.  And, President Trump is not the only President to demand that.  Reagan, Clinton, W, and even Obama demanded the same thing!!  It’s just that Chris doesn’t like Trump.  So, he is attacking him because..well…he’s Trump.  The hypocrisy is breathtaking.  But, Chris the blowhard is not interested in facts; only bloviating.  Tool..

Trump gets boost from British PM Theresa May at NATO summit

British Prime Minister Theresa May on Wednesday showed she was siding with Present Trump at the NATO summit in Brussels, saying her country was paying its fair share for the defense alliance. “We lead by example, not only by meeting the NATO targets of spending 2 percent of our GDP on defense,” Mrs. May said, adding that the U.K. also deploys thousands of troops to NATO missions around the world. Mr. Trump has made cost sharing a top issue at the summit. He has been pressing for all 29 member nations to pony up the 2 percent of GDP, which is the level agreed to in 2014. The U.K. is among a handful of NATO countries siding with Mr. Trump as he shakes up the military alliance. Most of the allies are rankled and riled by Mr. Trump’s demand that they pay up. Last year, only six other countries spent at least 2 percent: U.S., U.K., Greece, Estonia, Romania and Poland. The U.S. spent a little more than 3.5 percent of GDP on NATO defense. Mrs. May announced that the U.K. was sending an additional 440 troops to NATO’s mission in Afghanistan. “I think that shows when NATO calls, the UK is one of the first to step up,” she said. “But that gives us a powerful voice in NATO. It enables us to work as we have done to ensure that NATO adapts to meet the new threats of cyberterrorism, as well as conventional threats. “I’m sure at this summit we will be talking — President Trump and all the allies round the table — about how we can ensure that NATO is adaptable and flexible to meet the threats of the future,” Mrs. May said.

Trump taps Brett Kavanaugh for Supreme Court

President Trump nominated Judge Brett M. Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court on Monday night, setting up a furious partisan confirmation battle as he seeks to move the high court firmly under conservatives’ control for decades to come. In a prime-time announcement at the White House, the president tapped Judge Kavanaugh of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit after a 12-day whirlwind search to replace the retiring Justice Anthony M. Kennedy. “He is a brilliant jurist,” Mr. Trump said as he introduced the nominee and his family. “There is no one in America more qualified for this position.” Judge Kavanaugh, 53, has served on the appeals court since 2006, ruling on some of the nation’s most high-profile cases on a court that is considered a steppingstone to the Supreme Court. He is a favorite of the conservative Washington legal establishment. He worked in the White House counsel’s office under President George W. Bush and helped draft special counsel Kenneth W. Starr’s report urging the impeachment of President Clinton. The nominee also was a clerk to Justice Kennedy. Leonard Leo, an outside adviser to the president for judicial selection, said Judge Kavanaugh “is among the most distinguished and respected judges in the country, with nearly 300 opinions that clearly demonstrate fairness and a commitment to interpreting the Constitution as it’s written and enforcing the limits on government power contained in the Constitution.” As the president wrapped up a selection process that included interviews with at least seven candidates, he passed over three other appeals court judges who were on his short list: Thomas Hardiman of the 3rd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals, Amy Coney Barrett of the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals and Raymond Kethledge of the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Also in the audience in the East Room was Sen. Mike Lee, Utah Republican, who conferred with the president last week on the nomination but didn’t make the short list. Judge Kavanaugh said he was “deeply honored” to be nominated to replace Justice Kennedy. “Mr. President, I am grateful to you, and I’m humbled by your confidence in me,” he said. When the president introduced his nominee, the audience gave him a standing ovation for one minute and eight seconds. “I know the people in this room very well. They do not stand and give applause like that very often. So they have some respect,” Mr. Trump said. The pick is Mr. Trump’s second to the nation’s highest court, after he selected Justice Neil M. Gorsuch last year to replace Justice Antonin Scalia, who died in 2016. The stakes are even higher with this nomination, as Mr. Trump seizes a rare opportunity for a president to reshape the court for a generation or longer. Justice Kennedy, who will turn 82 this month, announced his retirement June 27 as the longtime moderate swing vote on the high court. His retirement leaves the court with two solid blocs — four liberal and four conservative justices — and the next justice could be a pivotal vote on such issues as abortion, gay rights, entitlements, presidential authority, election law, labor rules and government regulation. The confirmation hearing promises to be a fierce battle. Republicans have a 51-49 majority and can’t afford to lose any votes because Sen. John McCain, Arizona Republican, is absent with brain cancer.