Homeland Security

Homeland Security to use DNA tests to thwart ‘fake’ illegal immigrant families

Border authorities have identified more than 1,000 “fake families” over the past seven months featuring adults trying to use children who aren’t their own to sneak into the U.S. Homeland Security officials revealed the number Wednesday as they announced a pilot program to begin using DNA testing to match children and the adults trying to sneak across the U.S.-Mexico boundary with them. “It’s definitely an escalating trend that we’re seeing,” one department official said of the fraudulent families. As the border spirals further out of control, President Trump sent Congress a request Wednesday for an emergency $4.5 billion infusion this year, warning that without the money the federal Health and Human Services Department will run out of cash to care for unaccompanied migrant children. HHS officials also acknowledged that a 16-year-old unaccompanied boy died in the custody of one of its contract shelters. The boy, who wasn’t identified beyond being Guatemalan, was arrested last month and sent to HHS on April 20 with no health complaints. The next morning, he became ill and had stints in and out of the hospital before being admitted finally on April 22. He remained in intensive care until he died Tuesday.

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Mexican troops disarmed American soldiers on US side of the border

Armed Mexican troops disarmed two United States soldiers while they were on the American side of the border, U.S. defense officials have said. U.S. Northern Command said in a statement that “five to six Mexican military personnel questioned two U.S. Army soldiers who were conducting border support operations” this month. The U.S. soldiers were in an unmarked Customs and Border Protection [CBP] vehicle near the southwest border near Clint, Texas. Officials confirmed that the Mexican troops were armed with what seemed to be rifles. They raised their weapons when they saw the two U.S. soldiers, and then took a pistol from one and put it in the CBP vehicle. According to officials talking to CNN, the two Americans obliged “in an attempt to de-escalate a potential volatile situation.” “Throughout the incident, the U.S. soldiers followed all established procedures and protocols,” the statement said. The two U.S. troops were on the south side of the security perimeter but north of the Rio Grande and thus were in the U.S., according side American territory, it added. Pentagon and Department of Homeland Security officials demanded an explanation from the Mexican government. “An inquiry by CBP and DOD [Department of Defense] revealed that the Mexican military members believed that the US Army soldiers were south of the border,” the statement said. “Though they were south of the border fence, U.S. soldiers remained in U.S. territory, north of the actual border.”

Soo..  Is an official apology forthcoming from the Mexican government for this outrageous invasion onto our side, and the confrontation with our American soldiers?  Our politicians need to demand that official apology now!  Call, or email, your member of Congress and both of your U.S. Senators and demand that they secure that apology.  Major kudos to our troops who handled that with such class and professionalism.  They are a credit to their uniforms.  They could easily have turned the tables, and ended that nonsense real quick in a way that would have ended very differently.  Mexican troops make, on average, a couple hundred incursions onto U.S. soil each ear.  And, sometimes, they fire on U.S. Border Patrol agents, etc.  Yeah…  You read that correctly.  So, this is hardly an isolated incident.  That’s why our politicians need to really push back on the Mexican government.  If anything, it’s just another reason why we need to BUILD THE WALL NOW!!!..and put armed U.S. Army National Guard troops physically ON the border with Mexico to prevent would-be crossers from setting on foot on U.S. soil…as well as to deter these sorts of incursions onto our side by Mexican troops.

John Lott: Media exaggerate impact of US-Mexico border closure

Let’s hope that President Trump’s “one-year warning” issued to Mexico Thursday to halt the flood of illegal drugs and migrants entering the U.S. – or face a border closure and new tariffs – will influence Mexico to make some real changes. Unfortunately, the media’s continual exaggerations of the dangers of closing the border may give Mexico the idea that the U.S. lacks the willpower to carry through on the president’s threat. If Mexican leaders conclude Trump is bluffing, there will be little reason for them to change their behavior. Take the headline this week in the Washington Post, sternly warning: “U.S. would run out of avocados in 3 weeks if border is closed.” USA Today, NBC News, CBS News, CNN, and many other media outlets have run virtually identical headlines. The stories all paint a simple picture: we would soon have no avocados to eat unless we keep getting them from Mexico. After all, avocados can’t be stored for more than three weeks, and nearly 90 percent of our current imports come from Mexico. No more guacamole. No more avocado toast. The news media are hyping avocados the most because they think that will strike close to home with people. But despite the certainty of these news stories, avocados wouldn’t disappear even if the border was closed for months. The economics are straightforward. Mexico grows about 34 percent of the world’s avocados, and they account for almost half the exports. But other major producers include the Dominican Republic, Peru, Colombia and Chile. The United States imports fewer avocados than the European Union, Canada and Japan combined. If the U.S.-Mexico border is closed, avocados that would have shipped to these other countries would be shipped to the U.S., while the avocados that Mexico normally sends to the U.S. would now go to other countries. The price of avocados could go up a little, since it’s more costly to ship from South America. But we wouldn’t run out of avocados or any other foods. The U.S. imports about $26 billion in food from Mexico each year. That’s just a small fraction of the $1.62 trillion that Americans spent on food and beverages in 2017. The No. 1 food and beverage import from Mexico is beer, with a value of $3.3 billion annually. But plenty of substitutes are brewed in the U.S., which annually spends $35 billion on beer. There are places along the border with Mexico that would bear a disproportionate burden from a shutdown. But the news media are exaggerating the costs to the U.S. What about the costs of continuing to have a porous border through which illegal immigrants can cross? Take just the costs of education. The average per-pupil cost of public schooling (including the costs of facilities) is over $13,200 per year. Conservatively, approximately 540,000 school-age illegal immigrants (ages 5 to 17) live in the U.S., along with another 2.54 million U.S.-born children of illegal immigrants. Their schooling costs taxpayers at least $41 billion a year. That figure increases if these students go on to public colleges. President Trump is rightly concerned that a porous border is hazardous to national safety. The Crime Prevention Research Center, of which I am president, recently found that illegal immigrants in Arizona are at least 142 percent more likely to be convicted of a crime than other Arizonans. These crimes tend to be more serious, and illegal immigrants are 45 percent more likely to be gang members than prison inmates who are American citizens. If illegal immigrants in the rest of the U.S. commit crimes at the same rate as illegal immigrants in Arizona, a nationwide population of 11.3 million illegal immigrants would mean an additional 1,647 murders each year. That means the murder count would be 11 percent higher than it otherwise would be. There would also be 8,900 more rapes, 20,000 more robberies, and 53,000 more aggravated assaults. Should President Trump eventually decide to close the border, his economic advisers want to keep the freight lanes open so commerce would continue unabated. If the president does so and closes the border to people, the economic costs of a shutdown would be much smaller. Still, it might not ever be necessary to close the border at all. The threat alone has already started moving Mexico in the right direction to stop the throngs of Central Americans who travel through the country up to the U.S. It is not obvious what Mexico stands to gain from Central Americans traveling to our country. After all, these aren’t Mexican citizens. The problem of illegal drugs is much more difficult to solve. Trade benefits both the United States and Mexico. There would be real costs from closing the border, but the news media’s dire predictions wouldn’t come true.

Of course they wouldn’t..  Thanks to John R. Lott, Jr. for that outstanding analysis, and calling the “fake news” media out for their ridiculous lies and exaggerations.  John is an economist and was formerly chief economist at the United States Sentencing Commission. Lott is also a leading expert on guns and op-eds on that issue are done in conjunction with the Crime Prevention Research Center. He is the author of nine books including “More Guns, Less Crime.” His latest book is “The War on Guns: Arming Yourself Against Gun Control Lies (August 1, 2016). Follow him on Twitter @johnrlottjr.

Border Patrol Arrests Previously Deported Child Rapist 75 Miles into Texas

Del Rio Sector Border Patrol agents arrested a previously deported child rapist in a town located about 75 miles north of the Texas-Mexico border. Immigration officers deported the convicted sex offender in 2018. Agents assigned to the Rocksprings Border Patrol Station arrested a 26-year-old man they determined had illegally entered the U.S. The agents transported the subject to the station in Rocksprings, Texas, where they conducted a biometric background investigation. The investigation revealed that a court in Seattle, Washington, convicted the Mexican national in 2011 for rape of a child. Despite an extensive criminal history, the court in Seattle sentenced the criminal alien to only one year in state prison. Immigration officers removed the violent sex offender in 2018, according to information obtained from Del Rio Sector Border Patrol officials. “Violent criminals continue to illegally cross the border to make their way further into the United States,” Del Rio Sector Acting Chief Patrol Agent Matthew J. Hudak said in a written statement. “Our agents are committed to preventing these types of criminals from entering and harming our communities.” Federal prosecutors in the Western District of Texas are expected to file felony charges for illegal re-entry after removal as a sex offender. If convicted under the 8 USC § 1326 charge, the illegal immigrant could face up to 20 years in federal prison. “All individuals arrested by the U.S. Border Patrol undergo record checks using biometrics to ensure those with criminal history or gang affiliation are positively identified,” Del Rio Sector officials stated.

DHS on track to nab 100,000 illegals at border this month

The government is on track to catch nearly 100,000 illegal immigrants at the border this month, Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen said Monday, renewing the administration’s plea for Congress to do something. That number would be the worst in more than a decade, and it’s more troubling than the worst years because the migrants are children and families who despite being unauthorized, are almost impossible to deport. “The situation at our Southern Border has gone from a crisis, to a national emergency, to a near systemwide meltdown,” Ms. Nielsen said in delivering an update on the state of her department 16 years after it was established. Ms. Nielsen said the border wall is part of the solution, but also said Congress must change the laws to allow for detention and faster deportations of illegal immigrant children and families. According to the latest numbers, 98 percent of those caught at the border in 2017 is still in the U.S. today, underscoring how difficult it is to remove them in the current framework. March’s nearly 100,000 migrants — which includes those encountered at ports of entry demanding admittance without permission, and those nabbed by agents after they jumped the line between the ports — compares to about 76,000 in February. At the beginning of this decade, the rates were less than 30,000 a month. Ms. Nielsen said her department’s challenges go well beyond the border.

Trump says wall needed to stem drugs, too

President Trump said Wednesday the sheer amount of drugs flowing across the border — from meth to cocaine to deadly fentanyl — bolsters his case for declaring an emergency at the border, as Congress prepares to complete its rebuke of his decision to go around lawmakers for funding. “We’ve got to get the wall up, otherwise it all doesn’t work,” Mr. Trump said. The administration is building the case for his wall — a core 2016 campaign promise — ahead of a Senate vote Thursday to disapprove of the emergency Mr. Trump declared to tap Pentagon funds for the project. The House already passed a resolution to overturn the declaration, and enough Republicans appear ready to join Democrats in the Senate to approve it, though not enough to override Mr. Trump’s expected veto. “We’ll see whether or not I have to do the veto,” Mr. Trump said. The president also downplayed his decision’s impact on Republicans, who’ve been forced to choose between supporting the White House and defending Congress’ power over the nation’s purse strings. “Nobody’s beaten up. I said, ‘Use your own discretion,’” he said. The president would prefer to avoid the embarrassing rebuke, however. He said Republican senators are “overthinking” the vote and should see it as a simple choice to bolster border security and prevent crime. “This is a vote on border security and drugs and trafficking and all of that,” Mr. Trump said. “I think most Republican senators fully understand that.” Also Wednesday, Vice President Mike Pence visited a Customs and Border Protection training facility in West Virginia to build the case for the wall. “Despite the extraordinary work of all of you and those you represent in law enforcement, drug cartels and smugglers are exploiting this crisis to flood drugs into our country, tearing apart our families, claiming American lives,” he told officers.

Democrats Offer Plan to Release All Child Traffickers at Border into U.S.

The House Democrats’ first offer to President Trump in negotiations to fund his proposed United States-Mexico border wall includes a provision that would end all immigration enforcement for migrants trafficking children across the southern border. The draft budget provides the Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agency with $7.4 billion, nearly $850 million less than requested by the Trump administration, and funds only 1,250 beds for adults and migrant children coming across the border this year, a decrease in detention space. Attached to that funding, though, is an immigration enforcement ban first introduced by Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) and supported by every Senate Democrat. The Democrats’ offer demands that all immigration enforcement end for any adult crossing the border with a child by the end of Fiscal Year 2019. Rather than being held in detention for a period of time, those adults and the migrant children they trafficked across the U.S.-Mexico border would be released immediately into the interior of the country. Sen. Tom Cotton (R-AR) previously called the plan the “Child Trafficking Encouragement Act” as it ensures that adults bringing children to the southern border would gain immediate access into the U.S. without fear of being deported or turned away. The number of adult illegal aliens arriving at the southern border with children has continued surging under Trump. The latest Department of Homeland Security (DHS) data reveals the number of adults crossing the border with children has skyrocketed 280 percent compared to the same time last year. Last year, the U.S. saw a record number of adult border crossers coming to the U.S. with children. This year, if border reforms are not implemented, DHS officials expect to break last year’s record. As of December 2018, overall illegal immigration is up 81 percent compared to the same time last year. As Breitbart News reported, the House Democrat offer does not include any money to construct a wall, much less a barrier, at the U.S.-Mexico border but it does provide about $502 million for “humanitarian concerns,” funding that illegal aliens and border crossers would have access to in the form of food, transportation, medical care, and housing.