Health

Do you have Netflix face? How the blue light from your phone, laptop and iPad is ruining your skin

Look away now, because blue light from your mobile phone, laptop and other devices could be causing damage, premature aging and hyperpigmentation to your skin. According to experts, spending hours each day online could be having a drastic impact on the health of our skin – and it’s all to do with blue light. How long do you spend each day looking at a screen? From mobile phones to staring at our computer screens and tablets, we’re clocking up hours upon hours of time exposing our skin to blue light (otherwise known as high-energy visible light). According to Glamour, it’s having a detrimental impact on our skin, with 79 percent of us checking our smartphones before bed. Added to that, 28 percent of us will reach for our phones in the five minutes before we turn out the lights and over half of us check our devices within 15 minutes of waking up. According to Dr. Sweta Rai, a spokeswoman for the British Association of Dermatologists, light from your screens can “cause some pigmentation problems.” “They can give you a falsely aged appearance, we see that often in darker skin people,” she explained. “If you look at a pristine face and put brown spots on it it will look aged from sun damage. “There is some truth to the fact that blue light penetrates deeper into the skin compared to UV light. “And that is being studied at the moment as to what effect it does have.” The effect of blue light on our skin has led to several beauty brands launching blue light-fighting products. Earlier this year, dermatologist and clinical assistant professor at New York University Shari Marchbein, told Allure: “Visible light, especially in the blue wavelength, has become a hot topic in skin care, as there is mounting evidence that supports its contribution to photo-aging, including wrinkles, worsening skin laxity, and hyperpigmentation.” And it seems other practicing dermatologists have noticed a growing trend in accelerated hyperpigmentation. Dr. Engelman, consulting dermatologist for Elizabeth Arden told Glamour: “Women in their early twenties come into my office with heightened pigmentation.

Wow..  I guess we’re all screwed.  For more on this depressing article, click on the text above.

This Is the Right Time to Drink Your Coffee, Scientists Say

We love coffee. And what’s not to love? It perks us up in the morning, tastes heavenly and even has health benefits (plus a few extra benefits if you try it “bulletproof”-style). But as much as we love a hot cuppa as soon as we roll out of bed, it turns out that might not be the best time to take advantage of all coffee has to offer. In fact, scientists have found that there’s a better time to get your morning caffeine fix. Turns out the best time to drink coffee might not be first thing in the morning, but an hour after you wake up. This is because in the hour after you wake up, your body’s production of cortisol is at one of its three daily peaks, according to researchers who published a small but intriguing clinical study. We tend to think of cortisol as the “stress hormone” because it’s secreted in higher amounts when feel strain or tension from circumstances we perceive as demanding (and decreases when we eat yummy chocolate). But another way of thinking of cortisol is as the “alertness hormone,” because the reason our bodies produce more cortisol when we’re under stress is that it increases alertness (which supports our “fight or flight” response when we’re faced with stressful situations). Consuming caffeine while our bodies are already at peak cortisol-production teaches the body to produce less cortisol, according to chronopharmacologists who study the way drugs (such as caffeine) interact with our body’s natural biological rhythms. Not only does this undermine the effect of the caffeine, it also works against cortisol’s alertness effect. Perhaps even worse, it may contribute to developing a tolerance for coffee (meaning that it takes more and more just to get to the same place — yikes)! So to get the biggest jolt from your morning coffee, try to wait an hour after waking to brew that first cup (I know it can be hard!). And when you’re looking to follow up with another caffeine fix, try to do it outside the other peak cortisol production times — typically between noon and 1:00 p.m. and between 5:50 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. This will definitely help you kick any of those afternoon lull feelings and will power you into a productive evening.

Good to know!    🙂

Apple Watch can now detect your irregular heart rhythms and other problems: Here’s how it works

Apple Watch users can now take a reading of their heart’s electrical signal by holding a finger on the crown of the device. On Thursday, customers with the Apple Watch Series 4 who install the latest software update can access a new feature to identify atrial fibrillation, a common form of an irregular heart rhythm, as well as opt in to more passive monitoring. Anyone over age 22 can use these new heart health features, although not all them are designed for people who have already been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, or AFib, by their doctor. All of this has been in the works for years. Apple got a first-of-its-kind clearance for its electrocardiogram app from federal regulators in September after conducting a preclinical study with 2,000 people. It also did a clinical trial with 600 other participants to ensure it could distinguish between a normal heartbeat, or sinus rhythm, and atrial fibrillation. The company released data on its new features in a white paper, published on Thursday, as well as a physician-facing website. Click here for more

If you’re an Apple Watch Series 4 owner, and have heart concerns, you really need to read this article.  Just click on the text above for more.   This is excellent!    🙂

Trying to lose weight? Stepping on a scale each day could help, study finds

Anyone who’s ever tried to lose weight knows how difficult reaching your weight loss goals can be. But a new study found those who stepped on a scale on a daily basis were more likely to shed weight than those who did not. The study — which was conducted by researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing and the University of California, San Francisco School of Medicine and is slated to be presented at the American Heart Association’s Scientific Sessions 2018 in Chicago later this week — analyzed 1,042 adults with an average age of 47 over 12 months. During this time, participants — using scales that were either WiFi or Bluetooth enabled, according to Health magazine — weighed themselves “at home as they normally would, without interventions, guidance or weight-loss incentives from researchers,” according to the American Heart Association’s news release regarding the study. The data was then sent back to researchers. By the year’s end, researchers concluded those who never weighed themselves or only did so once a week “did not lose weight in the following year.” But those who stepped on the scale six or seven days a week “had significant weight loss,” shedding roughly 1.7 percent of their body weight, according to the study. “Monitoring your behavior or body weight may increase your awareness of how changing behaviors can affect weight loss. These findings support the central role of self-monitoring in changing behavior and increasing success in any attempt to better manage weight,” according to the study’s authors. That said, using a scale on the daily may not be for everyone. In fact, it could be a negative experience for those with body image issues, health expert Cynthia Sass told Health magazine. “Some of my clients view weight simply as a data point. Others experience an emotional connection to that number that can trigger a great deal of anxiety, and even depression, or other unhealthy patterns, like under-eating and rebound binge eating,” Sass said.

Suicide rates up among younger veterans, VA says

The number of suicides among younger veterans has increased “substantially,” according to a report released Wednesday by the Department of Veterans Affairs. (VA). The latest statistics show that 45 of every 100,000 veterans ages 18-34 committed suicide in 2016 – up from around 40 a year earlier. “These findings underscore the fact that suicide is a national public health issue that affects communities everywhere,” the VA said in a statement obtained by The Wall Street Journal. “Our goal is to prevent suicide among all veterans — even those who do not and may never seek care within VA’s system.” The VA found that there were more than 6,000 veteran suicides each year from 2008 to 2016. Veterans accounted for 14 percent of all suicides in the United States in 2016, yet veterans comprise just 8 percent of the population, the report said, according to the newspaper. In the report, the VA described veteran suicide as an “urgent crisis” that it can’t address by itself. Still, some advocates say the department has not devoted enough resources to this issue. “If any other population of 20 million people were exposed to these threats, it would be considered a public health priority,” Paul Rieckhoff, chief executive of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America, told the newspaper. “There has never been a national call to action.” Last year, the VA’s inspector general found the department’s suicide hotline had routed a high percentage of calls to backup centers, a major flaw the department says it has resolved. On Tuesday, the inspector general also released a report after a veteran killed himself less than 24 hours after his departure from a VA facility in Minnesota. The report accused the facility of not providing followup care for the veteran, who was taken into the hospital over suicidal ideation. “Because many veterans do not use VA services and benefits, we must build networks of support, communication and care across the communities where veterans live and thrive,” the report states. The data was released a day before a scheduled hearing by the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs. At the Thursday hearing, lawmakers are to discuss veteran suicide prevention efforts. The VA’s confidential Veterans Crisis Line is open 24/7 for vets and those concerned about them. The telephone number is 1-800-273-8255.

What really happens when you flush with the toilet seat up

I think it’s safe to say that this is about to be the grossest thing you’ll read all day. However, it’s probably one of the most important reads as well. Why? Because if you don’t close that toilet lid when you flush, a lot of unfriendly bacteria is going to spray all over your bathroom. And no, this is not a joke. According to a 2013 review of studies published by the American Journal of Infection Control, it’s clear that flushing your toilet with the lid wide open can pose potential risks. The specific act is called “toilet plume aerosols,” which occurs during flushing. When the toilet contains feces or vomit, the flush can produce potentially infectious aerosols that will live in your bathroom for hours. Now, keeping your bathroom clean isn’t a new idea, especially since bacteria can easily contaminate toilet seats, lids, surrounding floors or any nearby surfaces. But flushing your toilet probably isn’t in your immediate list of disease-ridden activities. If anything, flushing the toilet feels like a clean activity. Here are the specifics: When you flush the toilet, some fraction of the aerosol droplets produced while flushing could contain microbes. Microbes come from infectious diseases from whatever is in that toilet bowl. Vomit and feces can contain high pathogen concentrations such as Shigella, Salmonella, and even norovirus. These pathogens can actually survive on surfaces for weeks or even months. “Research suggests that this toilet plume could play an important role in the transmission of infectious diseases for which the pathogen is shed in feces or vomit,” the study says. “The possible role of toilet plume in airborne transmission of norovirus, SARS and pandemic influenza is of particular interest.” So for future reference, you may want to start closing the lid when you flush. Especially if that toilet is anywhere close to your toothbrush.

You’re welcome..     🙂

Medical marijuana bill would let veterans obtain weed with VA’s approval

Democrats have proposed legislation that would let the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs recommend marijuana to patients receiving treatment in states that have legalized the plant for medicinal purposes, eliminating obstacles caused by its status as a federally controlled substance. Introduced by Sens. Bill Nelson of Florida and Brian Schatz of Hawaii, the bill would allow “veterans to use, possess or transport medical marijuana and to discuss the use of medical marijuana with a physician of the Department of Veterans Affairs as authorized by State law,” according to a copy of its language released Wednesday. “Federal law prohibits VA doctors from prescribing or recommending medical marijuana to veterans,” Mr. Nelson said in a statement. “This legislation will allow veterans in Florida and elsewhere the same access to legitimately prescribed medication, just as any other patient in those 31 states would have.” While most states in the country have legalized marijuana for medicinal purposes or recreational purposes, the plant is considered a Schedule 1 substance under federal law, effectively prohibiting VA physicians from even discussing its potential health benefits with veterans seeking treatment through the government. In addition to letting VA physicians recommend medical marijuana to veterans, the proposed Veterans Medical Marijuana Safe Harbor Act would direct the VA to research its impact and any potentially reduction of opioid abuse among veterans. Opioids account for about 63 percent of all drug deaths in the U.S., and previous research found that veterans are twice as likely to die from an accident opioid overdose than non-veterans, according to the bill’s sponsors. Marijuana proponents have argued that its benefits offer a non-lethal alternative to opioids, and states that have legalized the plant for medical purposes have subsequently experienced a drop in annual fatal opioid overdoses by nearly 25 percent, lawmakers said in support of the bill. “VA has not taken a position on the bill,” VA Press Secretary Curt Cashour said…

This could be a potentially bad bill..  Trading one drug (opiod) for another (pot) is could be potentially very dangerous..  We’ll keep an eye on this one..