Health

Want to live longer? Drink green tea instead of black tea, study concludes

Calling all tea lovers: The next time you reach for a cuppa, try green tea — if you want to prolong your life, at least. That’s according to a new study recently concluded by researchers with the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and published Thursday in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology. Researchers found “habitual” tea drinkers — whom they defined as drinking tea at least three or more times a week — had longer and healthier lives than those who did not drink tea as regularly. But these benefits were only seen in those who drank green tea, not black tea. To come to this conclusion, researchers analyzed 100,902 Chinese participants with no history of heart attack, stroke or cancer. They were divided into two groups, those who drank tea three or more times a week, and those who drank tea less than three times a week. Participants were then followed-up after seven years. By the end, the researchers found that regular tea drinks had a 20 percent lower risk of suffering from heart disease or stroke, and a 22 percent lower risk of dying from heart disease and stroke. Then, to look at the “potential influence of changes in tea drinking behavior,” researchers about eight years later took a subset of study participants — 14,081 people — and assessed them after five years. By the end, they found those who continued to drink tea three or more times a week had a 39 percent lower risk of incident heart disease and stroke and a 56 percent lower risk of fatal heart disease and stroke. Men in the study saw more benefits than women, namely because a higher percentage of habitual tea drinkers were men. First author Dr. Xinyan Wang of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences said in a statement that 48 percent of regular tea drinkers in the study were men, while only 20 percent were women. Additionally, “women had a much lower incidence of, and mortality from, heart disease and stroke. These differences made it more likely to find statistically significant results among men,” she said. But why is green tea more beneficial than black? Senior author Dr. Dongfeng Gu of the Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences said in a statement that green tea is rich in polyphenols, micronutrients that, “protect against cardiovascular disease and its risk factors including high blood pressure and dyslipidemia.” Black tea, on the other hand, is fermented, during which process “polyphenols are oxidized into pigments and may lose their antioxidant effects.” Additionally, black tea is often served with milk, “which previous research has shown may counteract the favorable health effects of tea on vascular function,” according to a press release on the findings. That said, Gu noted that most people in East Asia prefer to drink green tea, which may have influenced the results to some degree. “In our study population, 49 [percent] of habitual tea drinkers consumed green tea most frequently, while only 8 [percent] preferred black tea,” he said. “The small proportion of habitual black tea drinkers might make it more difficult to observe robust associations, but our findings hint at a differential effect between tea types.”

As Veterans Affairs mental health services increase, veteran homelessness decreases

A Marine Corps veteran is crediting the decline in veteran homelessness to an increase in the Veterans Affairs’ budget and mental health services. The number of homeless veterans in the U.S. is down to 37,000, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development. This is a decrease of 2 percent in the last year and a 50 percent decrease since 2010. Retired Gunnery Sgt. Jessie Jane Duff, co-chair of Veterans for Trump, discussed military funding on FOX Business’ “Making Money with Charles Payne” on Thursday. “The V.A. has received a budget of $86.5 billion dollars,” Duff said, referring to fiscal year 2019. “And within that, we also have mental health capability; $8.6 billion was allocated for mental health.” Duff said many cases of homelessness are associated with mental health-related issues. “You start having walk-in capability at our VA hospitals for those veterans who are seeking help,” she said. “These [services] are no-brainers that should have happened over a decade ago when we saw veteran suicides skyrocket.” Duff also pointed to veteran unemployment, which is “its lowest level ever at 3 percent.” She praised the government for allocating funds to “these real-world issues.”

Michigan teen with vape-related illness undergoes double lung transplant

A 17-year-old boy in Michigan is believed to be the first patient to undergo a double lung transplant as a result of irreversible damage done to his organs via vaping. In a press conference on Tuesday, surgeons at Henry Ford Hospital said that without the transplant he would have died. “Our teen patient would have faced certain death if it were not for the lung transplant happening,” Dr. Hassan Nehmeh, a thoracic surgeon and the hospital’s thoracic surgical director, said at the news conference. On Sept. 6, the then-16-year-old, who was not identified due to the family’s request for privacy, was admitted to Ascension St. John Hospital in Detroit, where he was treated for suspected pneumonia. When his condition worsened, he was transferred to Children’s Hospital of Michigan, where he was placed on an extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) machine to help his lungs heal. His condition continued to deteriorate, prompting his medical team to contact the lung transplant team at Henry Ford Hospital and begin coordinating his transfer. On Oct. 3, three doctors from Henry Ford placed a portable ECMO machine in their personal car and drove to Children’s Hospital of Michigan. After the youth was switched to the mobile machine, paramedics transported him via ambulance to Henry Ford. There, he went on the transplant waiting list. Nehmeh said the teen’s lungs were firm and thick with damaged tissue that had no chance of healing. The medical team declined to comment on what type of vaping products the teen had been using, or for how long he had been using them. “This is an evil I have not seen before,” Nehmeh said. On Oct. 15, the teen underwent a double lung transplant; he has since been taken off a ventilator and is mobile in the hospital but faces weeks of recovery. Dr. Lisa Allenspach, a pulmonologist at the hospital, read a statement from the family that repeated the request for privacy. They did express the hope that the details of the teen’s ordeal would dissuade others from picking up the vaping habit. “We are here today to beg the public to pay special attention to the steps that were taken in this case,” said Dr. Nicholas Yeldo, an anesthesiologist at the hospital who has advocated for smoking cessation aimed at teens. “Without the heroic measures, in this case, this young patient would have died there is no doubt about it. I beg of you, this was not just the unlucky one. This is happening way, way too much for us to turn our heads to this.” The medical team repeated Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) statistics about the deadly dangers of vaping; there have been 39 fatalities nationwide, and over 2,000 instances of illnesses. “This is a senseless disease process and preventable death,” Nehmeh said.

This is a cautionary tale worth passing along to those teens who vape.

Not washing your hands after using bathroom worse than eating raw meat, study finds

Experts have revealed that failure to wash hands after leaving the bathroom is more likely to spread drug-resistant E. coli than consuming raw or under-cooked meat. According to the study, the potentially fatal bacterium’s “likeliest route” is through human poop particles, which generally spreads through poor bathroom hygiene. Last year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention investigated nearly 3,000 cases of Escherichia coli. Researchers pinpoint one type — Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL)-producing E. coli — as one that is particularly difficult to treat. “Rather — and unpalatably — the likeliest route of transmission for ESBL-E.coli is directly from human to human, with fecal particles from one person reaching the mouth of another,” said University of East Anglia professor David Livermore, whose study is published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases journal. ESBL-E. coli live in the intestines of humans and animals, much of which is harmless. However, some strains can cause symptoms of food poisoning such as diarrhea and vomiting, urinary tract infections and, more concerning, blood infections. Livermore and his colleagues in the UK tested samples of beef, pork and chicken and analyzed those results against samples of human feces, sewerage and blood. They discovered that strains between the human samples were similar, but different from those found in animals. They say this indicates there is “little crossover” of ESBL-E. coli between humans and animals, said Livermore, meaning it’s being spread primarily between humans. “Here — in the case of ESBL-E.coli — it’s much more important to wash your hands after going to the toilet,” said Livermore, adding that appropriately cooking meat remains critical to avoiding food-borne illness. Though many varieties of ESBL won’t make you sick, the ones that do are proliferating. “Infections caused by ESBL-E. coli bacteria are difficult to treat. And they are becoming more common in both the community and hospitals,” said Livermore. “Mortality rates among people infected with these super-bug strains are double those of people infected with strains that are susceptible to treatment.” Unfortunately, even adults could use a refresher on proper hand-washing techniques, according to a study by the Royal Pharmaceutical Society (RPS). In 2017, they surveyed more than 2,000 people and found that 84 percent don’t scrub their hands with soap and water for the recommended minimum of 20 seconds. More disturbingly, 21 percent admitted they do not always wash their hands after leaving the bathroom. They warn that failure to perform good hygiene causes more illness, which means more use of antibiotics, leading to an increase in drug-resistant bacteria, also called “superbugs.” “If we can reduce the number of illnesses where antibiotics are needed,” said RPS president Ash Soni, “we can reduce antibiotic resistance by saving these important medicines for when they are really required.”

Its sad we need so-called “experts” to tell us what should be basic common sense.  But, here we are..  If you use the bathroom, wash your hands…with soap, for cryin’ out loud..

Wearing mascara every day is BAD for your eyes, docs warn

Humans have been wearing mascara for centuries – with Egyptians inventing it more than 4,000 years ago. And it’s a staple in many people’s makeup bags, with many women feeling incomplete without it. However, it might be time to ditch it, at least a few days a week – as doctors warn that putting it on every day can actually do more harm than good. It comes as many makeup users are using mascara that has past its expiration or leaving it on for longer than they should. In particular, research by the College of Optometrists revealed over half of make-up users do not check the instructions to see how long they should keep their mascara on for, with almost a fifth admitting they didn’t even know that expiration information existed. Dr. Alexis Granite, consulting dermatologist for Kiehl’s Since 1851, has revealed that constantly wearing mascara can cause inflammation and infection and even loss of your eyelashes. She said: “Removing eye make-up before you go to sleep is crucial. “Any product that isn’t taken off has the potential to not only clog your pores, but also cause irritation, inflammation and infections. “Inflammation around the eyelids can also lead to lash loss.” Similarly, Ceri Smith-Jaynes, optometrist and spokeswoman for the Association of Optometrists, revealed that wearing mascara every day can cause “serious infection” and damage the “tear film.” “Generally, any cosmetic applied around the eye area can migrate into the eye in a matter of minutes,” she told the Sun Online. “Some mascaras are particularly fibrous and will irritate some patients and some cosmetics will disrupt the coating of tears, which is supposed to cover the surface of the eye as a smooth tear film. “If this ‘tear film’ is disrupted, the tears evaporate more quickly and the eye becomes dry, again leading to irritation. “Despite the preservatives in mascara, eventually the bottle is likely to become contaminated with the bacteria that live naturally on your skin – one study showed 30 percent of mascara bottles tested had bacterial contamination after just three months of use. “Adding water or saliva to thin the mascara or sharing mascara with others can increase the contamination. When these bacteria reach large numbers, infection is more likely. “I recommend paying careful attention to the symbol on the bottle (usually says 3M or 6M with an egg timer or open jar symbol) and discarding the bottle after the manufacturer’s recommended period. “Not all eye infections are immediately obvious, so don’t be tempted to lend someone your mascara wand just because they don’t have a sticky, red eye. “Demodex mites live in many people’s eyelash follicles and can be transferred by sharing mascara. “These cause gradual inflammation and irritation of the lid margin (blepharitis) and are tough to get rid of. “Serious infections of the cornea are rare but are more likely if you accidentally scratch your eye with the mascara wand. So, make sure you’re somewhere steady and don’t be tempted to apply your mascara on a moving train or in the car. “It’s worth mentioning that oil-based eye make-up removers can also disrupt your tear film and are normally needed when the mascara is water-proof.” It comes after one woman was almost left blind after 25 years of falling asleep with her eye make-up on – causing solid black lumps to become embedded in her eye.

Crazy..  For more, click on the text above..

Dozens of Midwest teens who reported vaping hospitalized with ‘severe lung injury,’ breathing problems

More than a dozen teens in the Midwest who reported vaping have been hospitalized with lung issues, stumping doctors who are searching for what exactly is sickening them. The Minnesota Department of Health announced Tuesday four cases of young people at Children’s Minnesota with “severe lung injury” possibly tied to vaping. The cases were announced days after Illinois health officials reported six cases and at least 12 were confirmed in Wisconsin, state health officials said. There are more under investigation. “These cases are similar to lung disease cases recently reported in Wisconsin and Illinois, though it is too early to say whether they are connected,” the Minnesota Department of Health said. Patients are reporting similar symptoms – shortness of breath, chest pain, cough, and vomiting in some cases – and some have been admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Teens across states reported using vaping devices for both nicotine and THC, the psychoactive ingredient in marijuana that produces the “high” sensation, prior to their hospitalization. In Minnesota, specifically, doctors at first thought the teens had some sort of respiratory infection – possibly pneumonia – but ruled this out after they failed to improve with treatment. In fact, according to NBC News, many of the teens treated for a respiratory infection got worse, not better. “We are deeply concerned by the severe cases of lung injury associated with vaping that we are currently seeing,” Dr. Emily Chapman, chief medical officer at Children’s Minnesota, said in a news release. “These cases are extremely complex to diagnose, as symptoms can mimic a common infection yet can lead to severe complications and extended hospitalization. Medical attention is essential; respiratory conditions can continue to decline without proper treatment.” In Wisconsin, Dr. David D. Gummin, medical director of the Wisconsin Poison Center, and professor and chief of medical toxicology at the Medical College of Wisconsin, told The New York Times officials “have no leads” to a specific substance that’s causing respiratory issues “other than those that are associated with smoking or vaping,” he said. The negative health effects associated with cigarette and cigar use have long been documented, leading to a decline in both among teens in the U.S. in recent years. In 2018, for example, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reported roughly 1 in 50 – about 1.8 percent – of middle school students said they smoked cigarettes in the past 30 days, down from 4.3 percent in 2011 and a drastic decrease from 36.4 percent in 1997 when rates “peaked after increasing throughout the first half of the 1990s,” according to the American Lung Association. But the same is not true for e-cigarette use. In 2018, nearly 1 of every 20 middle school students (4.9 percent) reported using electronic cigarettes in the past 30 days. That’s an increase from less than 1 percent in 2011. Last year, the Surgeon General of the United States, Jerome Adams, declared vaping among American teens an “epidemic.” “This is an unprecedented challenge,” Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said in response at the time. The health issues – both short and long term – of e-cigarette use are not well understood, and the U.S. Food and Drug and Administration (FDA) does not require the manufacturers of e-cigarette devices to list all the ingredients in them. “The risk here is that if people are presenting to hospital emergency rooms or urgent cares, they either may not think of vaping as something that is threatening and may not include it in their history,” Chapman told The New York Times. “Or if asked directly, they may not be comfortable sharing that.” A recent study from Yale University and Duke University found the e-cigarette liquid in Juul devices contain chemicals known as acetals. Acetals, according to the researchers, could cause lung irritation. Separately, the FDA announced last week it’s investigating 127 reports of seizures occurring after vaping. “The truth of the matter is, we have so little experience with vaping, relative to the experience we have with cigarettes and cigars. Recall how long it took us to figure out that cigarettes were linked to lung cancer,” Chapman added. “There is so much we don’t know.”

Indeed..  Bottom line, vaping has many health risks; including ones that even the doctors aren’t sure about.  So, if you or anyone you know vapes, please share this article with them.  Clearly, it’s foolish to ASSume that vaping is safer than smoking cigarettes.  And, we know how risky that is.

Can holding in your pee really kill you?

We’ve all had that desperate urge to pee but not been in the most convenient place to go. But turns out holding it in is actually quite bad for your health. Now, we aren’t suggesting you just relieve yourself the instant you feel the need to go – occasionally holding it shouldn’t do any damage. It’s when you’re consistently avoiding going to the bathroom when your body tells you to that you could cause yourself problems. You might not feel like it, but your bladder holds up to half a litre of urine. There are tiny receptors on the bladder wall that can detect how much is in there and send a message to your brain when it’s full. Thankfully, your brain also sends a signal back telling your bladder to hold on – otherwise things could get really messy. But if you decide to ignore those signals from your body and hold on for too long it could have some serious consequences. Worst-case scenario, urine could back up into your kidneys and could cause them to fail, which could be fatal. The good news is you are much more likely to lose control of your muscles and wet yourself way before that happens. Click here to see some of the more likely reasons to never hold in your pee…

You’re welcome..      🙂