fentanyl

San Francisco saw 150 percent spike in fentanyl-related deaths last year, report says

The number of deaths from fentanyl overdoses in San Francisco jumped by nearly 150 percent last year, according to a report by the city’s public health department made public this week. According to the San Francisco Chronicle, 89 deaths in the city were attributed to fentanyl overdoses, up from 37 deaths in 2017. By comparison, 70 people died from prescription opioid overdoses and 60 deaths were attributed to heroin overdoses. A preliminary report released in June attributed 57 deaths to fentanyl overdoses, but health officials told the Chronicle they had expected that figure to increase as the city medical examiner determined the cause of more deaths. The city has experienced an uptick in fentanyl-related deaths since 2008, when five deaths were reported. In 2010, six deaths were attributed to the drug, which killed 22 people in 2016. “It’s not a huge surprise to see this, although it’s certainly disappointing and sad to have lost this many lives in the city,” Dr. Phillip Coffin, the director of substance use research for the San Francisco Department of Public Health, told the Chronicle.“Unfortunately, there is no locality that can withstand the introduction of fentanyl without some increase in mortality.” In its legal form, fentanyl is used to treat patients recovering from surgery. However, the synthetic drug is often mixed with other drugs like heroin and cocaine in powder form for those looking to get high, KTVU reported in June. “In San Francisco, that’s how fentanyl came to us. In counterfeit pills at first a few years ago. At this point it is its own drug supply,” Kristen Marshall from the Drug Overdose Prevention & Education Project told the station. Fentanyl is a highly addictive opiate that is 100 times more potent than other prescription opioids like morphine, according to the paper. “It has taken over heroin as the number one choice for opioid,” Dr. Chris Colwell, chief of emergency medicine at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, told the station. Coffin said fentanyl has “become more and more prevalent as the opioid that people are using in San Francisco” and “is a riskier opioid compared to prescription opioids.” A Drug Enforcement Administration report said drug companies shipped billions of painkillers across America without proper oversight for several years, exacerbating the opioid crisis. The report said 76 billion oxycodone and hydrocodone pills were shipped to mostly rural and working-class communities in the Appalachian region, which has become the epicenter of the crisis.

Just add this to the list of failures in San Francisco, which has been under solid Democrat party control for over half a century.  Yeah..  over half a century.  Everything from the homeless crisis there, to the drug needles in the streets and people defecating in the streets..to out-of-control crime, and now fentanyl..all due to failed public policies of Democrats who have a stranglehold on what was once a thriving and beautiful city.  And, with an over 10-1 Democrat voter registration advantage, that won’t change anytime soon.

Largest Fentanyl Seizure in U.S. History Occurs at Arizona Border Checkpoint

U.S. Border Customs and Border Patrol agents seized 254 pounds of fentanyl and 395 pounds of methamphetamine during a regular inspection of an 18-wheeler at the commercial border crossing in Nogales, Arizona Saturday. The seizure of fentanyl was the largest ever recorded at a U.S. port of entry. U.S. border agents assigned to the Mariposa Port of Entry made contact with a 26-year-old Mexican truck driver at approximately 8:50 am. Agents referred the male to a secondary inspection where the truck was scanned with a non-intrusive detection system. Agents detected irregularities within the cabin, specifically the rear floorboard, according to a statement by Michael Humphries, the area port director for the Nogales Port of Entry. A K-9 detection dog was brought in for further inspection and alerted to an odor. Agents discovered concealed cargo in an after-market compartment underneath a load of cucumbers. Authorities found 254 pounds of fentanyl and 395 pounds of methamphetamine, according to a Border Patrol press conference. The fentanyl was in 100 individual packages in powder form except for 10, consisting of pills. The methamphetamine was in 300 separate packages. The value of the fentanyl was estimated at $3.5 million with the methamphetamine valued at $1.2 million. “Fentanyl is 80 to 100 times stronger than morphine and the size of a few grains of salt can kill a person very quickly,” according to Nogales Port Director Michael Humphries. He further stated, “This amount of fentanyl our CBP officers prevented from entering our country equates to an un-measurably dangerous amount of an opioid that could have harmed so many families.” The 26-year old driver was arrested and handed over to Immigration and Customs Enforcement Homeland Security Investigators. The load of cucumbers was destroyed.

Trump signs sweeping opioids bill, says effort will make ‘big dent’ in deadly crisis

President Trump signed a mammoth opioids bill Wednesday designed to expand treatment options, fund nonaddictive painkillers and stop the flow of deadly synthetic drugs from abroad, calling it a critical piece of ongoing efforts to put a “big dent” in the crisis. The president offered handshakes all around after signing the bill in the ornate East Room of the White House, handing his pen to House Energy and Commerce Chairman Greg Walden, who steered the effort on his side of the Capitol. A bipartisan effort, the bill cleared both chambers by wide margins and offered a respite from partisan bickering over the Supreme Court and midterm contests. It also came hours after authorities intercepted mailed pipe bombs targeting CNN and past and present Democratic leaders. Mr. Trump told addiction survivors, law enforcement and other guests the bill capped “historic” efforts he’s taken in the last year to rein in the drug overdose epidemic, which killed a record 70,000 people in 2017. He cited indictments of Chinese nationals suspected of trafficking fentanyl, the launch of a Just Say No-style campaign against opioid use and a crackdown on doctors who wrote fraudulent prescriptions for opioids. And officials from a series of private companies, from Amazon to Facebook, shook hands with Mr. Trump while a narrator listed their efforts to combat addiction. “You won’t see the results immediately, but you’ll see the results in the future, and the very quick future,” Mr. Trump said. Dozens of lawmakers from both parties contributed to the legislative effort, which lifts cap on Medicaid funding for drug treatment, extends help to addicted mothers and empowers package inspectors to root out deadly fentanyl from China. Yet only one Democrat — Sen. Maggie Hassan of New Hampshire — was on hand for the signing, which comes less than two weeks before Election Day. A key part of the bill, the STOP Act, forces the U.S. Postal Service to collect advanced electronic data on packages entering the U.S. Private couriers such as UPS and FedEx already procure advanced data, which U.S. Customs and Border Protection uses to target suspicious packages that might contain fentanyl from clandestine labs in China and elsewhere. All packages from China, and 70 percent of the overall flow, must have the information available by the end of this year, and 100 percent global compliance is due by 2021. “This should cut down, almost immediately, the suspicious packages coming in from places like Mexico and China that contain illicit opioids like fentanyl,” White House Counselor Kellyanne Conway said. Officials say fentanyl has become the number-one killer in the drug-overdose crisis.

Trump declares opioids from Mexico, China ‘almost a form of warfare,’ tells Sessions to sue drug makers

Calling opioids coming into the U.S. from China and Mexico “almost a form of warfare,” President Trump on Thursday urged Attorney General Jeff Sessions to investigate foreign sources of fentanyl that he said are “killing our people.” Speaking during a Cabinet meeting Thursday, Trump also took the unusual step of urging Sessions to file a “major” new lawsuit against opioid suppliers and manufacturers, rather than join existing lawsuits filed by states affected by the spread of the highly addictive, deadly drugs. “It’s almost a form of warfare,” Trump said, referring to the drugs he called “garbage” that are flowing into the country. “I’d be very firm on that. It’s a disgrace and we can stop it.” Trump added: “I’d also like to ask you to bring a major lawsuit against the drug companies on opiods. Some states have done it, but I’d like a lawsuit to be brought against these companies that are really sending opiods at a level that — it really shouldn’t be happening. … People go into a hospital with a broken arm, they come out, they’re a drug addict.” More than 1,000 lawsuits by more than a dozen states have already been filed nationwide against distributors and manufacturers in recent months amid the opioid epidemic. Earlier this week, New York sued the maker of the prescription opioid painkiller OxyContin, saying Purdue Pharma has misled both patients and doctors about the dangers of their drug. In June, Massachusetts also sued Purdue and its executives, accusing the company of fueling the deadly drug abuse crisis by spinning a “web of illegal deceit” to boost profits. The lawsuit, which the state’s attorney general said was the first to call out the names of company executives in connection with opioid deaths, came as Purdue was already defending against lawsuits from several other states and local governments. Other companies involved in litigation with states include manufacturers Johnson & Johnson and Teva Pharmaceuticals, as well as distributors. The suits generally involve claims that the drug makers have improperly downplayed the addictive qualities of their drugs, and that distributors have negligently handled their shipments. Sessions said he would comply with the president’s requests. “We absolutely will,” Sessions said Thursday. “We are returning indictments now against distributors from China; we’ve identified certain companies that are moving drugs from China, fentanyl in particular. We have confronted China about it … Most of it is going to Mexico and then crossing the border, unlawfully, from Mexico.” There were no signs of tension in the room, even though the attorney general has been a target of Trump’s ire in recent days.

Glad to hear..  Whatever people may think, or say, about AG Jeff Sessions, he has been a very loyal soldier in Trumps army.  For more on this article, click on the text above.