Entertainment

Sir Roger Moore dead at 89: James Bond star dies after short cancer battle

Sir Roger Moore has died aged 89. A statement was released today on the James Bond star’s Twitter account by his family. It read: “With the heaviest of hearts, we must share the awful news that our father, Sir Roger Moore, passed away today. We are all devastated.” He died in Switzerland after a short battle with cancer. The London-born star is best known for playing famous secret agent 007. He starred in seven Bond movies between 1973 and 1985. Before his glittering movie career, Sir Roger served in the Royal Army Service Corps as a second lieutenant, after being conscripted for national service shortly after the end of the Second World War. Sir Roger was the son of a poor London policeman from the back streets of Lambeth who grew up to become James Bond and The Saint – as one of the most successful actors of his generation. And in later life, shocked by the poverty he saw in India, Moore became a goodwill ambassador for Unicef, the United Nations’ children’s fund. More than a billion people saw him play Bond, making him one of the best-known British actors in the world. He brought a casual air of dashing elegance, sophistication and a surprising iron streak of ruthlessness to his two most famous roles. At 6ft 2in with pale blue eyes and fair hair, his debonair good looks were ideal for heroic roles. But part of his success was due to the sardonic approach he adopted, as if winking at the audience to share a mutual joke saying: “I’m having fun, are you?” His acting style was sometimes criticised for its lack of depth, yet he achieved huge success while happily acknowledging his limitations. He once admitted he could not act “in the Olivier sense” but described himself as a good technician. “When I was doing The Saint on television I had two expressions; as Bond I’ve managed to work up to four,” he joked.

Such sad news!!  Sir Roger Moore was the James Bond of my youth…and I think in many respects really embodied the true essence of what Ian Fleming tried to portray Bond as.  Moore was a class act.  To read the rest of this article, with many photos and videos spanning Moore’s carrier, click on the text above.  Thanks for all the fun memories Roger.  R.I.P.

Clint Eastwood: ‘We are killing ourselves’ with political correctness

Legendary actor and film director Clint Eastwood told a crowd at the Cannes Film Festival Sunday that political correctness is killing the entertainment industry. The Western film icon, who was visiting the festival in southern France for a 25th anniversary screening of his 1992 film “Unforgiven,” said America’s obsession with political correctness started around the time of the release of his 1971 movie “Dirty Harry,” according to The Hollywood Reporter. “It was far-out at that time, so I brought it to [director] Don [Siegel], and he liked it,” Mr. Eastwood said. “A lot of people thought it was politically incorrect. That was at the beginning of the era that we’re in now with political correctness. We are killing ourselves, we’ve lost our sense of humor. But I thought it was interesting and it was daring.” Mr. Eastwood made the comments during a master class conducted by Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan. Mr. Eastwood, who went to Cannes to introduce the screening of “Unforgiven,” said he initially hadn’t planned to sit through the entire movie. “I thought I’d just sit through the first five minutes, but after a while I thought, ‘This isn’t so bad, so maybe I’ll stay for it,’” he said, THR reported. “I enjoyed it. I saw a lot of things that I’d forgotten.” Mr. Eastwood’s current movie project is “The 15:17 to Paris,” the Warner Bros. Pictures’ retelling of the 2015 heroics of three Americans who stopped an Islamic State attack on a train from Brussels to Paris. Mr. Eastwood, who describes himself as libertarian, has been outspoken against political correctness in the past. He told Esquire magazine in August that then-Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump had been so successful in his campaign because “everybody’s getting tired of political correctness, kissing up.” “That’s the kiss-ass generation we’re in right now. We’re really in a p–- generation. Everybody’s walking on eggshells,” the director said at the time.

‘Star Trek: Discovery’ Trailer Goes Where No Trailer Has Gone Before

The new trailer for “Star Trek: Discovery” is finally here, and it’s out of this world. The series faced some bumps along the way, having its premiere repeatedly delayed, but CBS finally released the trailer at its upfront presentation on Wednesday. From the teaser, we learn that 10 years before Captain Kirk there was First Officer Michael Burnham, aka Sonequa Martin-Green from “The Walking Dead.” And she kicks butt. In addition to Martin-Green, “Star Trek: Discovery” features a solid cast, including Michelle Yeoh (”Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2”) as Captain Philippa Georgiou, Jason Isaacs (aka Lucius Malfoy from “Harry Potter”) as Captain Lorca, and James Frain (”Gotham”) as Spock’s father. The network seems to have a lot of confidence in the show, as it already bumped up a Season 1 order from 13 to 15 episodes. From this trailer, we can see why. You can watch “Star Trek: Discovery” on CBS All Access this fall. Click here to see the trailer.

Yes!!    🙂

Val Kilmer Credits Christian Science Faith for Helping to Cure His Cancer

Val Kilmer credits love and his Christian Science faith for helping him successfully beat cancer. Page Six pointed out that in a Reddit AMA on Tuesday, one user asked the actor and devout Christian Scientist: “What would you want fans to know about having, and beating, the Big C.?” “I am very grateful for all the prayers and good thoughts from around the world,” the 57-year-old Heat star replied. “People that know I am a Christian Scientist make the assumption that I have somehow endangered myself. But many many people have been healed by prayer throughout recorded history. And many many people have died by whatever was modern medicine.” Kilmer said that multiple doctors prayed for him while he was in the hospital and he even spoke to the inventor of the defibrillator, Dr. Bernard Lowen. Kilmer recounted his conversation with Lowen, saying, “He started to weep without his voice wavering and he leaned into me and said, ‘Fluff their pillow. That what I tell all the interns. LOVE. Love heals. More than any other skills, I urge them to LOVE the life they are entrusted to save.’ Well that’s what is at the heart of Mrs. Eddy’s understanding of the teachings of Jesus.” Kilmer revealed his battle with cancer in a previous Reddit AMA when one user asked him about actor Michael Douglas’ claim that he was battling a terminal form of the illness. “He was probably trying to help me cause press probably asked where I was these days, and I did have a healing of cancer, but my tongue is still swollen altho healing all the time,” Kilmer replied then. “Because I don’t sound my normal self yet people think I may still be under the weather.”

Glad to hear Val is on the mend.  As someone who was raised in “CS,” I respect his putting that out there like that.  It takes guts to do that.  We wish Val a complete, and thorough “healing.”

Powers Boothe, known for villain roles in ‘Deadwood’ and ‘Sin City,’ dies at 68

Powers Boothe, the character actor known for his villain roles in TV’s “Deadwood,” and in the movies “Tombstone,” ”Sin City” and “The Avengers,” has died. He was 68. Boothe’s publicist says he died of natural causes at his home in Los Angeles Sunday. Beau Bridges tweeted the news and called him “a dear friend, great actor, devoted father and husband.” The veteran actor won an Emmy award in 1980 for playing cult leader Jim Jones in the TV movie “Guyana Tragedy: The Story of Jim Jones.” He also had memorable roles playing the ruthless saloon owner Cy Tolliver in “Deadwood,” the gunman Curly Bill Brocius in “Tombstone” and the corrupt senator in “Sin City.” A private service will be held in Texas where he was from.

Many folks will remember him as one of the members of the “World Security Council” in the movie The Avengers…and a role he’d reprise in the spin-off tv series “Marvel’s Agents of SHIELD.  But, remember when he played the shot down Air Force pilot in the original Red Dawn?  Thanks for all the memories, Powers.  R.I.P.

40 years ago in a galaxy far, far away, ‘Star Wars’ was born

On March 24, 1976, Variety reported that George Lucas had begun filming “Star Wars,” an $8 million film for Fox, in Tunisia. Alec Guinness would play “a bearded old desert rat who was once a leading general in galactic wars.” The article continued that the three younger leads hadn’t yet been revealed, but a few weeks later, Mark Hamill was announced as Luke Starkiller — yes, that was his name then — in “the outer-space comedy-adventure.” After the movie’s May 25, 1977, opening, our front page proclaimed “Star Wars Best Start Since Jaws,” citing the nearly $2.6 million at 43 locations (an average of almost $60,000 per theater). On June 10, Variety reported “The direct cost of the film was about $10 million. Fox has 60% of the profits, Lucas 40% (from which he dealt out points to others). Break-even is estimated in the neighborhood of $22 million-$25 million.” In 2017, it’s shocking to think anyone even speculated about whether “Star Wars” would break even. At the end of 1977, Variety said the film’s domestic total for the year was $197 million, with rentals (the portion of the box office returned to the studio) at a huge $125 million. As of 2017, the estimated worldwide take is $775 million. When Oscar nominations for 1977 were unveiled, a trio of Fox films led the pack: “Julia” and “The Turning Point,” with 11 apiece, followed closely by “Star Wars,” with 10. Lucas was nominated for both his direction and original screenplay, and the film was also cited for art direction, costume design, editing, music, sound and visual effects. On the night of the awards, “Star Wars” took home the most prizes, including those last six plus a special award to Benjamin Burtt Jr. “for the creation of the alien, creature and robot voices in ‘Star Wars.’” But Lucas won in neither category, and Guinness was an also-ran, losing out as supporting actor to Jason Robards for “Julia.” (Guinness is the only actor Oscar-nominated so far for a “Star Wars” role.) “Annie Hall” was named best picture, and won four awards in all, including director and screenplay. In the days before the 1980s homevideo explosion, hit movies lingered in theaters a long time after their debut, and nothing was hotter than “Star Wars.” More than a year after its 1977 launch, it was still a big draw. On June 14, 1978, a two-page ad in Variety proclaimed, “‘Star Wars’ is more than a movie. It is the perfect merchandising tie-in for you this summer.” The ad listed 25 companies that had licensing agreements for “SW” merchandise. “You can contact them to make merchandising tie-ins to coincide with your summer playdates of Star Wars.” That ad offers clues to the way business was done in those days. First, the fact that “Star Wars” was still a big draw for theater owners; and second, the idea that merchandise was still in its pioneer days — even though Disney had been doing it for decades, it wasn’t widespread for live-action films. Also outmoded these day but not then: that exhibitors played a key role in deciding what items would sell in their area.

I remember seeing Star Wars for the first time…as a kid in the theater when it first came out.  From the very beginning where that big Imperial ship comes from behind and the surround stereo effect that shook the auditorium..it forever had an impact on me.  Happy Birthday, Star Wars!     🙂

Fabio: Don’t Give Up Your Guns

Actor Fabio Lanzoni said Europe is proof that when you give up your right to bear arms, you give more power to politicians. “Everybody comes here because of the American dream,” Fabio said during an interview on the FOX Business Network’s Varney & Co. “Look what happened to Nazi Germany – they took away all the guns from people and you see what happened.” The Italian-American actor, best known for his appearances on romance novel covers throughout the 1980’s, blamed political corruption for the violent attacks in Europe. “Police there have handguns [and] the bad guys, they have rocket launchers, RPG, [and] hand grenades,” he said. He also spoke out against California Governor Jerry Brown’s Proposition 57, which modifies the state’s prison system. “He is releasing tens of thousands of criminals back in the streets and also he lowered the crime into misdemeanor,” he said, and added that “cops are very demoralized.” “You saw it happen to Europe, the politicians in Europe—they neuter the law enforcement and now they have to be shot before they can even return the fire… you don’t want this movie coming to a theater near you,” he said.

Good for Fabio for speaking out and giving his HollyWEIRD colleagues a little history lesson..  But, I still can’t believe it’s not butter!    🙂