Employment

Private-sector jobs grow by 235,000 in February, vs 195,000 expected: ADP/Moody’s Analytics

Job creation saw another powerful month in February, with companies adding 235,000 positions, ADP and Moody’s Analytics reported Wednesday. The total again defied Wall Street expectations, as economists surveyed by Thomson Reuters were expecting payrolls to grow by 195,000. Growth actually decelerated slightly, as January posted an upwardly revised 244,000 from the initially reported 234,000. February marked the fourth month in a row that private payrolls hit 200,000 or better. “The job market is red hot and threatens to overheat,” Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s, said in a statement. “With government spending increases and tax cuts, growth is set to accelerate.” February saw broad-based gains that stretched across both the services and goods-producing sectors. Leisure and hospitality led industry groups with 50,000 jobs, while professional and business services contributed 46,000 and trade, transportation and utilities added 44,000. However, construction rose 21,000 and manufacturing notched 14,000 new positions. In all, goods-producing industries increased by 37,000 while all services-related businesses added 198,000.

More great economic news!!     🙂

BOOM! Economy Adds 228,000 Jobs

The U.S. economy added 228,000 jobs in November, exceeding economist expectations of 200,000 jobs. Unemployment held steady at 4.1 percent. Despite the strong job growth, inflations data was tepid. Earnings rose just 0.2 percent, less than the 0.3 percent expected. On an annualized basis, wage were up 2.5 percent compared with economist expectations of 2.7 percent. Manufacturing added 31,000 jobs, while health care added 30,000. The biggest gainer was “professional and business services,” which added 46,000 jobs.

Great economic news!!  To read more, click on the text above.  Excellent!!  🙂

Hiring Rebounded in October, Unemployment Rate Fell to 4.1%

The U.S. jobless rate fell to a 17-year low in October and employers hired at a strong pace, showing the labor market bounced back from recent hurricanes. Nonfarm payrolls rose a seasonally adjusted 261,000 in October, the Labor Department said Friday. September’s payroll data, initially reported as the first drop in seven years, were revised to show employers actually created 18,000 new jobs that month, extending the economy’s streak of job gains to a record 85 straight months. The pace of job creation in the U.S. remains solid despite the hit to the economy from Hurricane Harvey, which battered Texas in late August, and Irma, which hit Florida in early September. Job gains have averaged 162,000 over the past three months, a modest slowdown from a 185,000 average over the past two years. The unemployment rate fell to 4.1% in October, its lowest level since December 2000. The unemployment rate, which changed little over the course of 2016, has barreled down from 4.8% at the start of this year…

More great economic news in this Trump economy!  Excellent!!

Fewest Jobless Claims Since 1973 Show Firm U.S. Job Market

Filings for unemployment benefits plunged last week to the lowest level since 1973 as workers affected by hurricanes Harvey and Irma continued to return to their jobs, Labor Department figures showed Thursday. The larger-than-projected decrease in claims probably reflected difficulty adjusting for the Columbus Day holiday. At the same time, the report showed further declines in claims in hurricane- affected states. The storms initially led to a spike in applications in Texas and the southeastern U.S. in late August and early September. The latest period also encompasses the reporting week that the Labor Department surveys for its October employment figures. Claims are at the lowest level in more than four decades, indicating employers have little desire to cut staffing levels amid a shortage of qualified workers.

More great news in this Trump economy!!    🙂

63.1%: Participation Rate Reaches Trump-Era High; Record Number of Employed

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma are long gone, and despite dire predictions, they did not dampen the September jobs report in most key areas. The Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday said the labor force participation rate of 63.1 percent reached a high for the year in September, up two-tenths of a point from August. The number of employed Americans reached 154,345,000 in September, setting a sixth record since January. As the number of employed Americans reached an all-time high, the number of unemployed Americans in September — 6,801,000 — hasn’t been this low since May 2007. The already low unemployment rate dropped another two-tenths of a point to 4.2 percent last month. That is the lowest since early 2001. BLS noted that the recent hurricanes had “no discernible effect on the national unemployment rate.” The number of Americans not in the labor force declined a bit in September to 94,417,000. The record, set in the final full month of the Obama presidency, stands at 95,102,000 Americans not in the labor force.

Some excellent news!!  Sure there are some mixed stats.   But, on balance, Americans have much to be optimistic about in this Trump economy.  To read the rest of this article, click on the text above.

Study: Maryland County Would Lose 47,000 Jobs by 2022 if It Raises Minimum Wage to $15

A Maryland county could lose an estimated 47,000 jobs by 2022 if it chooses to raise the minimum wage to $15 an hour, according to a new study released Tuesday evening. The Washington Post reports that the study, which Montgomery County Executive Isiah Leggett (D) commissioned, found that the majority of positions that would be eliminated were low-wage jobs. Leggett decided to move forward with the study after he vetoed a minimum wage increase in January. In explaining his decision to veto the minimum wage increase, he said the wage hike would devastate the economy in Montgomery County. PFM, the Philadelphia-based consulting group that carried out the study, found that a minimum wage hike to $15 would lead to a $396.5 million loss of income in Montgomery County by 2022. The loss of income would come from businesses deciding to lay off employees, cut hours and benefits for those that remain, and nix plans to hire new workers and open new locations. “We can’t minimize some of the impacts outlined here,” said Leggett, responding to the study’s results. “Even if it’s not 47,000 jobs lost, even if it’s half that, those are some startling numbers. You can’t discount ­it all.” County council member Marc Elrich, however, remains unconvinced of the study’s findings. Elrich proposed a bill that would raise the minimum wage in Montgomery County to $15 by 2022 a week before the study was due. He called the PFM study “nonsense,” saying it was impossible to predict how a wage increase would impact the future. Elrich also claimed that the study was biased because employers would be more likely to respond negatively. PFM’s study was conducted from April to June using electronic surveys, phone, and in-person interviews with business and nonprofit owners and community leaders. Several studies on minimum wage hikes conclude that they are bad for business — both for employers and employees. A Harvard Business School study from April found that minimum wage laws increase the chance that non-elite restaurants will go out of business. A June study from the University of Washington found that Seattle’s minimum wage hike is cutting employees’ salaries by $125 a month.

Raising the minimum wage arbitrarily is a foolish thing.  But, it’s trendy and popular in big cities and blue states where Dems are in control.   So, kudos to Mr. Leggett (D) in Montgomery County, Maryland for putting common sense ahead of a failed liberal Democrat agenda item.  Wages should be determined by the free marketplace; NOT some politician or silly, however popular, ballot initiative.

Record 153,513,000 Employed in July; 62.9% Labor Force Participation

President Trump was awake early on this “employment report” Friday, tweeting about jobs, regulation-busting, and consumer confidence, among other things. A few hours later, the Labor Department’s Bureau of Labor Statistics said the economy added 209,000 jobs in July; the number of employed people jumped by 345,000 to 153,513,000 in July, setting a third straight monthly record; the number of Americans counted as not in the labor force, meaning they don’t have a job and are not looking for one, dropped for a third straight month to 94,657,000; and the nation’s unemployment rate also dropped a tenth of a point, to 4.3 percent. The labor force participation rate, held down in part by a wave of Baby Boomer retirements, was 62.9 percent in July, slightly better than it has been in recent months, but still close to its 38-year low of 62.4 percent in September 2015. (The record high was 67.3 percent in 2000.) In July, the nation’s civilian noninstitutionalized population, consisting of all people age 16 or older who were not in the military or an institution, reached 255,151,000. Of those, 160,494,000 participated in the labor force by either holding a job or actively seeking one. The 160,494,000 who participated in the labor force equaled 62.9 percent of the 255,151,000 civilian noninstitutionalized population.

More great news in this Trump economy!  To read the rest of this article, click on the text above.  Excellent!   🙂