Coal Industry

Trump EPA overhauls Obama-era regulations for coal-fired power plants

The Trump administration announced new plans Tuesday to roll back and replace Obama-era regulations on emissions from coal-fired power plants – a move praised by the coal industry as a job saver but panned by critics as a green-light to polluters. The newly unveiled Affordable Clean Energy (ACE) Rule, as it’s called, would give states broad authority to determine how to restrict carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions that contribute to global warming. It’s meant as a replacement to the Obama-era Clean Power Plan that sought to speed up the closure of coal-burning power plants and cut back on greenhouse gases by cutting carbon dioxide emissions and encouraging utilities to invest in cleaner energy sources like wind and solar. “The ACE Rule would restore the rule of law and empower states to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide modern, reliable, and affordable energy for all Americans,” Environmental Protection Agency Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler said in a statement. “Today’s proposal provides the states and regulated community the certainty they need to continue environmental progress while fulfilling President Trump’s goal of energy dominance.” The effort is part of Trump’s overall bid to roll back regulations and help the struggling coal sector in particular. He is likely to highlight the plan at a rally in Charleston, W.Va., Tuesday evening. While the Obama administration and Democrats saw the Clean Power Plan as a crucial component in international efforts to curb global warming, Republicans have long claimed those regulations went too far and were too costly. From the start of President Trump’s administration, his Environmental Protection Agency has been working to overhaul the program. “An important part of what we are doing here is getting us back in our lane — we believe the CPP went beyond the EPA’s legal authority in many ways,” EPA Assistant Administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation Bill Wehrum said during a press call on Tuesday. “We think we are on very firm legal ground — much more so than the CPP was.” Without making a specific reference to the EPA proposal, Trump tweeted Tuesday that he’s “done so much for West Virginia” as he teased the rally, adding: “CLEAN COAL!!!!” The new plan would let states set performance standards for existing coal-fired power plants, providing them with a list of “candidate technologies” that can be used to draft their plans. The proposal would let states relax pollution rules for power plants that need upgrades, according to a summary reviewed by The Associated Press.

This is nowhere near enough..  BUT, it’s definitely a step in the right direction.  Kudos to President Trump and his administration for putting American energy, jobs, and common sense ahead of trendy political correctness.  Excellent!!    🙂

First New Coal Mine of Trump Era Opens in Pennsylvania

President Trump lauded the opening of the nation’s first new coal mine in recent memory. Corsa Coal Company will operate the mine in Somerset County, Pa. – outside of Pittsburgh. Corsa CEO George Dethlefsen said the mine will be a boon to the struggling local economy. He praised Trump’s easing of regulations and encouragement for fossil fuel exploration. Dethlefsen told Leland Vittert that for the 70 positions available in the mine, 400 people applied. “It’s a hard day’s work every day, but it’s worth it,” one miner said. Vittert said the news contrasts with Hillary Clinton’s message that she would “put a lot of coal miners out of work.” Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf (D), who endorsed Clinton, joined the mine company in watching a video message from Trump commemorating the occasion. R.J. Harris, a longtime host on Harrisburg’s 580-WHP, said the mine opening is a “shot in the arm” for the Keystone economy. Pennsylvania was once home to the world’s largest coal breaker, the St. Nicholas Breaker in Mahanoy City. In its heyday, the breaker could process 12,000 tons of anthracite coal each day, according to the Allentown Morning Call. Demolition began on the Schuylkill County behemoth in 2015 – a sign of the times in the coal region. Though, Harris said he is optimistic that Corsa’s mine opening is evidence that Trump can help turn the region’s economy around. The mine will reportedly be producing metallurgical or bituminous coal – which is used in steel-making – while anthracite is the type often used in energy production.

Great news for Somerset County, PA!!  Another one of Trump’s promises kept.  Excellent!!   🙂

‘The War on Coal Is Over’: Donald Trump Signs Energy Executive Order

President Donald Trump made a dramatic display of executive power at the Environmental Protection Agency, as he signed an executive order to begin ratcheting back the Obama-era EPA regulations. “My administration is putting an end to the war on coal,” Trump said in a speech prior to signing the executive order. Trump was joined by Environmental Protection Agency administrator Scott Pruitt, Secretary of Energy Rick Perry, and Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke. “Our nation can’t run on pixie dust and hope,” Zinke said during his speech. “The last eight years showed that.” Vice President Mike Pence was also present for the event. “President Trump digs coal,” Pence said as he introduced Trump. “The war on coal is over.” Several coal miners were also present at the event, and at one point Trump left the podium in the middle of his speech to shake all of their hands. “We’re with you 100%,” he said, recalling his campaign promise to put them back to work. Trump said that his executive order was focused on giving power back to the states and back to the people to restore American energy jobs. “We’re going to have safety, we’re going to have clean water, we’re going to have clean air, but so many are unnecessary and so many are job killing, we’re getting rid of the bad ones,” he said. Despite his focus on coal miners, Trump also praised EPA employees. “You’re doing important work to protect our health and public resources, so important,” he said. Trump also recognized Sen. Shelley Moore Capito (D-VA), who joined the event. After signing the executive order, Trump reached back with one of the signature pens and gave it to the miners.

Excellent news!!!    🙂

Coal mining begins seeing revival as Trump gives industry hope

Wise County, Virginia – A long-awaited revival is under way in this beleaguered Central Appalachia community where residents see coal as the once and future king. Trucks are running again. Miners working seven days a week cannot keep up with current demand. Coal mines, long dormant after the industry’s collapse, are now buzzing again with antlike activity. “We load coal every day for the power plant in Virginia City,” explained Rick, a long-time supervisor for a major local operation who did not want to give his last name. “There’s one shipment a week for Georgia Power, and one for Tennessee Eastman.” The past month has seen a resurgence of the coal industry that once formed the backbone of the region’s economy, and locals credit President Trump’s aggressive, pro-energy agenda. Crippled by a slew of factors, from changing times, an emphasis on renewable energy, and the Obama administration’s harsh penalties on coal-fired power plants, the area’s economy took a devastating hit over the past eight years. Many of the people living in these mountains had nearly given up hope that the area could ever recover. The smaller communities in this county in southwest Virginia, such as the towns of Appalachia, Pound and St. Paul, were the hardest hit, but the ripple effects were felt far and wide. Prospects changed nearly overnight. President Trump had promised to do everything he could to lift the coal mining industry. Trump began to make good on his pledge last month when he eliminated the Stream Protection Rule, which had placed layers of regulations on the industry. Although it will take a while before the coal industry recovers, the metallurgical or “met coal” markets – coal used to make steel – are already seeing a major upswing. The price for met coal is twice as high as it was a year ago, which is causing a boom in the coalfields. The turnaround owes to more than just Trump. China cut its own production, which helps lift the met industry in the United States. But, many in this area say, Trump’s moves to lift regulations are stoking a rally they have not seen in years. Ramasco Resources began producing its first coal mine in December and said it would open two more this year. In Pennsylvania, Corsa Coal also announced this month that it would begin mining operations beginning in May, according to Bloomberg. “There’s definitely cautious optimism after years of being brutally beaten down,” Jeremy Sussman, an analyst at Clarksons Platou Securities Inc., told Bloomberg. The production of coal reached its peak in 2008. But then President Obama came into office and rolled out a series of regulations that he said were designed to protect America’s streams and waterways from the pollution the mining emitted. Those regulations crippled the industry and left many in the region out of well-paying jobs. For those whose livelihood depended on the industry, the most important thing that Trump has given them is hope. “It was almost impossible due to the EPA regulations to open another deep mine,” said Rick. Just a few decades ago, when unions were strong in Wise County, the area leaned Democrat. But once the economy bottomed out and many were left without jobs, this corner of Virginia found itself feeling left behind. Nowadays, many homes in Wise County are adorned with Trump signs. This now-Republican stronghold is betting on a better future under the Trump administration. “It’s a slow thing,” said Adam, a mining equipment operator in the area who also did not want to give his last name. “It’s not going to be immediate, but there’s definitely some optimism right now.” It’s too early to tell whether or not coal will be king again. But with the stranglehold of regulations now on its way out, many in the area say they hope to see a full comeback.Wise County, Virginia – A long-awaited revival is under way in this beleaguered Central Appalachia community where residents see coal as the once and future king. Trucks are running again. Miners working seven days a week cannot keep up with current demand. Coal mines, long dormant after the industry’s collapse, are now buzzing again with antlike activity. “We load coal every day for the power plant in Virginia City,” explained Rick, a long-time supervisor for a major local operation who did not want to give his last name. “There’s one shipment a week for Georgia Power, and one for Tennessee Eastman.” The past month has seen a resurgence of the coal industry that once formed the backbone of the region’s economy, and locals credit President Trump’s aggressive, pro-energy agenda. Crippled by a slew of factors, from changing times, an emphasis on renewable energy, and the Obama administration’s harsh penalties on coal-fired power plants, the area’s economy took a devastating hit over the past eight years. Many of the people living in these mountains had nearly given up hope that the area could ever recover. The smaller communities in this county in southwest Virginia, such as the towns of Appalachia, Pound and St. Paul, were the hardest hit, but the ripple effects were felt far and wide. Prospects changed nearly overnight. President Trump had promised to do everything he could to lift the coal mining industry. Trump began to make good on his pledge last month when he eliminated the Stream Protection Rule, which had placed layers of regulations on the industry. Although it will take a while before the coal industry recovers, the metallurgical or “met coal” markets – coal used to make steel – are already seeing a major upswing. The price for met coal is twice as high as it was a year ago, which is causing a boom in the coalfields. The turnaround owes to more than just Trump. China cut its own production, which helps lift the met industry in the United States. But, many in this area say, Trump’s moves to lift regulations are stoking a rally they have not seen in years. Ramasco Resources began producing its first coal mine in December and said it would open two more this year. In Pennsylvania, Corsa Coal also announced this month that it would begin mining operations beginning in May, according to Bloomberg. “There’s definitely cautious optimism after years of being brutally beaten down,” Jeremy Sussman, an analyst at Clarksons Platou Securities Inc., told Bloomberg. The production of coal reached its peak in 2008. But then President Obama came into office and rolled out a series of regulations that he said were designed to protect America’s streams and waterways from the pollution the mining emitted. Those regulations crippled the industry and left many in the region out of well-paying jobs. For those whose livelihood depended on the industry, the most important thing that Trump has given them is hope. “It was almost impossible due to the EPA regulations to open another deep mine,” said Rick. Just a few decades ago, when unions were strong in Wise County, the area leaned Democrat. But once the economy bottomed out and many were left without jobs, this corner of Virginia found itself feeling left behind. Nowadays, many homes in Wise County are adorned with Trump signs. This now-Republican stronghold is betting on a better future under the Trump administration. “It’s a slow thing,” said Adam, a mining equipment operator in the area who also did not want to give his last name. “It’s not going to be immediate, but there’s definitely some optimism right now.” It’s too early to tell whether or not coal will be king again. But with the stranglehold of regulations now on its way out, many in the area say they hope to see a full comeback.

Let’s hope so!  And, THIS is why Trump won so many of the formerly “blue” Dem states.  Those states felt “left behind” as this article rightly notes.  For the last 8+ years, the Democrat party has been focusing on identity politics and going after minority special interest groups, and leaving blue-collar white voters (their former primary constituency) behind.  Trump seized on that and turned the political landscape upside down.  Those former Dem voters saw a party more interested in focusing on what bathrooms people should use, and pandering to illegal aliens, instead of focusing on the economy and jobs for actual American citizens.  And THAT is a major reason why Trump won.  The fact that Hillary was a corrupt, and horrible candidate was also part of it.  And yet, the Dems aren’t willing to take an honest look in the mirror and come to terms with those fact.  Instead, they’re ginning up the whole Russian involvement nonsense, and their willing accomplices in the dominantly liberal mainstream media continue to follow that story….which will go nowhere.

Federal Judge Gives EPA Until July to Identify Job Losses from Regulations

A federal judge in West Virginia has given the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) less than seven months to review whether its Obama-era policies directly led to job losses in the coal industry, according to an order issued Wednesday. As The Intelligencer / Wheeling News-Register reported, U.S. District Judge John Preston Bailey rebuked the agency for failing to perform such reporting requirements in the past: “EPA can recommend amendments to Congress if it feels strongly enough, but EPA’s clear reticence to comply, coupled with eight years of refusal to comply — even in the face of congressional and public pressure — with the Clean Air Act, justifies an injunction detailed enough to ensure compliance.” “It is time for the EPA to recognize that Congress makes the law, and EPA must not only enforce the law, it must obey it,” he continued. Bailey specified the first month of the Obama administration in 2009 as the starting point for the mandatory study. In addition to recording any past losses, the judge also ordered the EPA to identify any facilities that are at risk of shutting down due to increased regulation. The ruling follows an October 2016 decision in which Bailey said the EPA has a “non-discretionary duty” under the Clean Air Act to monitor the economic effect of regulations made using the law. It also comes in light of rules issued under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan in 2015. The EPA said the plan was supposed to set “the first-ever national standards” aimed at decreasing carbon emissions from power plants. Several states, however, sued the federal government in response over its perceived overreach. The Supreme Court issued a stay last February halting implementation of the Plan. And Oklahoma attorney general and Donald Trump’s nominee to head the EPA, Scott Pruitt, is right in the middle of it. Pruitt was one of the state attorneys general to sue the government over the Clean Power Plan in July 2015. As Bloomberg News writes, he issued a statement saying the rule was “an unlawful attempt to expand federal bureaucrats’ authority over states…in order to shutter coal-fired power plants.” Pruitt is set to appear before the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee next week for his confirmation hearing.

That oughtta be fun to watch..  As we’ve been saying from day one here at The Daily Buzz..  The EPA is an out-of-control, bloated, fascist, federal agency that needs to be reduced in size and scope of power…and ultimately dissolved entirely.  To be clear, the EPA does NOTHING for the environment whatsoever.  If anything, as we’ve documented here on numerous occassions, it has caused damage to our great country.  Those of us here in sunny Colorado are well aware of how the EPA screwed up the Gold King Mine..resulting in dumping all of those toxins into a river here…turning it orange.  The EPA serves only to bully individuals and small businesses…and in some cases, like the clean coal industry…put whole industries out of business…and passing the costs onto we-the-taxpayers.  We all want clean air and clean water.  But, we also want our jobs and not have a bunch of EPA thugs breaking down our doors and serving us with warrants because a little puddle developed in our backyard after a big rainstorm…and they want to declare it a “wetland.”  And yes, that HAS happened in recent years.

Obama rushes out 11th-hour regulations targeting beleaguered coal industry

At the eleventh hour, the Obama administration on Monday rolled out regulations to crack down on coal mining across the country, a parting shot against the beleaguered industry as the president leaves office. The regulations, designed to protect America’s streams and waterways from pollution produced during mining operations, will add significant costs to coal mining companies, many of which are struggling to operate. The Interior Department estimates that it will cost the coal industry about $81 million each year to comply with the rule. The agency stressed that figure is just 0.1 percent of the coal industry’s “aggregate annual revenues.” “We traveled the country, visited many mines and met with many of the people who work and live in coal country to make sure we wrote the best rule possible — one that is both economically achievable and protective,” said Janice Schneider, the Interior Department’s assistant secretary for land and minerals management. But critics, including leaders in the energy sector and Republicans on Capitol Hill, have said the proposal will be much more expensive and surely will lead to even more layoffs in the industry, which has been losing jobs each year during the Obama administration. Top Republican lawmakers, including House Speaker Paul D. Ryan, said Monday that they intend to work with the incoming Trump administration and scrap the rule early next year. “The Obama administration is fighting its war on coal to the bitter end. This one rule could have crushing consequences for coal miners, their families and many communities,” Mr. Ryan said in a statement. “If we are going to get America back on track, job-crushing regulations like this must stop. Our unified Republican government will act to provide coal country with relief.” The Interior Department’s Stream Protection Rule will go into effect 30 days after its official release and publication in the Federal Register, meaning it likely will be implemented Jan. 19, one day before Mr. Trump takes office. Congressional Republicans will have the power to reverse the rules with a simple majority vote.

Let’s hope they do!  Obama is such a tool…  Just think..  He’ll be gone a month from today.  Now THAT’s “hope and change!”     🙂

Bill Clinton Mocks ‘Coal People’ Who Oppose Hillary

Former president Bill Clinton again belittled the “coal people” who oppose Hillary Clinton for president — even though, he says, they voted for him in the 1990s. “We all know how her opponent’s done real well down in West Virginia and eastern Kentucky,” Clinton said during a rally in Pennsylvania. “Because the coal people don’t like any of us anymore.” Clinton said that many of the same people voted for him in the 1990s, which helped propel him to victory over Republicans George H.W. Bush and Bob Dole. “I won twice and they did well,” Clinton said, referring to economic stability during his administration. Clinton said that coal workers blamed President Obama for their economic misfortunes. “They blame the president when the sun doesn’t come up in the morning now,” Clinton said. Clinton also criticized coal workers during a rally in Tampa earlier this week, pointing out that they were wearing Trump shirts and “screaming” at him when he visited the state. He accused them of believing that global warming was a “Chinese hoax,” much like Donald Trump. He argued that coal workers should realize that the industry was dying and that it was time to focus on solar panels and windmills. “Coal employment peaked in 1920, coal production peaked in 1950,” he said, adding, “Climate change is real and we’re going to have to change our energy source.”

Obama was VERY clear when he campaigned for President that he would put the coal industry out of business.  So far, he certainly has made good on that promise.  And, Hillary has been very open about the fact that if she, God forbid, becomes our next president…that she’ll do even more in that area.  So, no..Bubba..  These poor coal miners aren’t whining when the “sun doesn’t come up in the morning now,” you tool.  They are justifiably upset that they’re losing their jobs over politically correct, agenda-driven liberalism pushed by our fascist president your self-righteous wife!  And then, you make fun of these poor folks!  Of course they’re wearing Trump t-shirts!

Biggest private coal producer warns of cutting 80 percent of workforce, head blames Obama policies

Murray Energy Corp., the largest privately held coal miner in the U.S., has warned that it may soon undertake one of the biggest layoffs in the sector during this time of low energy prices. In a notice sent to workers this week, Murray said it could lay off as many as 4,400 employees, or about 80% of its workforce, because of weak coal markets. The company said it anticipates “massive workforce reductions in September.” The law requires a 60-day waiting period before large layoffs occur. The American coal industry, especially in Appalachia, has languished as cheap natural gas replaces coal as fuel for power plants. World-wide demand for coal has also slumped, and new environmental regulations are making many coal mines unprofitable to operate. The Central Appalachian coal price benchmark is $40 a ton, or half its level from five years ago. Almost all of the biggest coal producers in the U.S. have declared bankruptcy in the past 18 months, including Peabody Energy Corp., Arch Coal Inc. and Alpha Natural Resources Inc. Robert Murray, the controlling owner of Murray, is a fierce opponent of President Obama and a supporter of Donald Trump. In a statement, the company said the potential layoffs were “due to the ongoing destruction of the United States coal industry by President Barack Obama, and his supporters, and the increased utilization of natural gas to generate electricity.” The move came just a day after the United Mine Workers of America said it would reject a proposed new labor deal with Murray. The existing contract expires at the end of this year. Phil Smith, a spokesman for the union, said the rejected deal is just a first step. “Hopefully the coal market will come to the point where [the layoffs are] not necessary,” he said. “It’s no secret the coal market is bad right now.”

Analysis: Washington Tells Us Our Electric Bills Will Rise

You have to admire the Obama Administration’s optimism. Even though the Supreme Court issued a stay on the president’s “Clean Power Plan” (CPP) earlier this year, the EPA insists that states should keep moving forward with efforts to radically alter their power sector. It’s a bold move, since the High Court has already determined that states shouldn’t be compelled to incur such hefty costs before the case is fully litigated. At the time of the High Court’s ruling, 27 states had formally opposed the CPP. That number has now risen to 29, as states grow increasingly concerned with both the federal overreach and massive costs involved. Although the president likes to tout the CPP’s projected energy efficiencies, he makes little comment about its economic ramifications. But if there were any doubt as to the plan’s hefty price tag, federal number crunchers at the Energy Information Administration (EIA) have released an analysis of the CPP’s impact. For starters, the EIA says the plan will mean “significantly higher” prices for residential and commercial electricity. They attribute this to “higher transmission and distribution costs” coming at a time when electricity consumption will also grow slightly (in 2015-2040), compared to 2000-2015. Interestingly, the EIA projects that these higher electricity prices will actually reduce demand 2 percent by 2030. Why? Because “compliance actions and higher prices” will force cash-strapped consumers to adopt their own austerity measures. A key part of the CPP is the dismantling of coal-fired power in the U.S. As the EIA sees it, “Coal’s share of total electricity generation, which was 50 percent in 2005 and 33 percent in 2015, falls to 21 percent in 2030 and to 18 percent in 2040.” Coal power plants currently anchor America’s base-load electricity generation, so it’s understandable that their elimination would drive up prices. But is such a move justified? The EIA projects that “renewable energy” (solar and wind) will play a “significant role in meeting electricity demand growth throughout most of the country.” It’s a bold gamble, since the EIA believes that renewables will account for 27 percent of total U.S. generation by 2040. But EIA data shows wind and solar power supplying only 5.6 percent of U.S. electricity generation in 2015. So, the jump to 27 percent will require significant investments. What’s instructive is EIA data on Germany, where residential retail electric prices have risen, and are expected to keep rising, due to higher taxes and fees for renewable power. Overall, Germany’s foray into green energy has driven the average residential electricity price to 35 cents/kWh, almost three times the U.S. average of 13 cents/kWh. Along with Denmark, Germany has some of the highest residential electricity prices in Europe. Under the Clean Power Plan, the EIA envisions the most significant changes in power generation occurring in regions where coal-fired power has played a key role, including the industrial Midwest. In the Northern Plains, coal power displaced by the CPP is expected to be replaced with increased renewables generation. The net “benefit” of the CPP is that it will lower total power sector carbon dioxide emissions 20 percent by 2030. However, the EIA doesn’t mention the simultaneous increase in CO2 emissions from new coal plants in China, India, and other emerging Asian nations. Overall, the CPP will impose massive expenses on businesses and consumers for CO2 reductions that will be instantly negated by far larger CO2 emissions growth overseas. Perhaps this explains why the Obama Administration’s former Department of Energy fossil fuel director, Charles McConnell, recently told a Congressional panel that the EPA’s plan is “ideological mumbo jumbo” that will not significantly affect global CO2 emissions. As McConnell, who now serves as executive director of Rice University’s Energy and Environment Initiative, subsequently explained, he is “not against climate regulations … but I am against stupid regulations.” The Supreme Court stay of the Clean Power Plan remains in effect, and governors currently have no legal obligation to comply. But thanks to the findings of the Energy Information Administration, they now have more reasons not to follow through. -Terry Jarrett is an energy attorney and consultant, and a former commissioner on the Missouri Public Service Commission

Thanks Terry! Outstanding analysis! 🙂

Hillary Clinton’s coal flip-flop could prove costly in general election

Hillary Clinton’s pitch to voters in Appalachia fell flat this week, and she is in real danger of losing the West Virginia primary to Sen. Bernard Sanders next week — but analysts say the former first lady has deeper problems in coal country that could spill into the general election. Mrs. Clinton has shifted positions on coal over the past eight years, moving from high praise for clean-coal technology and the fuel’s role in U.S. energy production in 2008 to guaranteeing miners will be out of work and coal mines shut down if she is elected to the White House in November. Although she has tried to distance herself from those inflammatory statements and salvage her campaign in the pro-coal territory of West Virginia, Kentucky and elsewhere, political analysts say there is little Mrs. Clinton can do to repair the damage. Attempts to appeal to blue-collar workers in Appalachia and possibly snatch those states from the Republican column in November look futile. “Yes, this is a different Clinton on fossil fuels than in 2008. She did quite well with white working-class voters in those parts of Appalachia in 2008. But she has not been making her appeals to coal country. Her recent statements on climate change have given her some problems. It did not go well for her in [Kentucky and West Virginia] over the past few days. In general, the Democrats are going to have electoral difficulties in those regions,” said G. Terry Madonna, a Pennsylvania pollster and professor of public affairs at Lancaster’s Franklin & Marshall College. Mrs. Clinton spent Monday and Tuesday in West Virginia and Kentucky in an attempt to smooth over a strained relationship with blue-collar workers, particularly those in the coal industry. Mrs. Clinton said earlier this year that more miners would be put out of work if she is elected president and vowed to continue President Obama’s unprecedented crackdown on carbon emissions through federal regulation. The former secretary of state then tried to retract her comments by saying she was merely opining on the fact that the U.S. coal industry is declining. “I don’t know how to explain it other than what I said was totally out of context from what I meant because I have been talking about helping coal country for a very long time, and I did put out a plan last summer,” she said. “I didn’t mean that we were going to do it. What I said was that is going to happen unless we take action to try to help and prevent it,” Mrs. Clinton said at a town hall meeting in West Virginia this week. But Mrs. Clinton’s words appear to ring hollow, even among voters in her own party. In West Virginia, where Democrats will vote in the party’s presidential primary next week, Mrs. Clinton is trailing Mr. Sanders. Mr. Sanders was in West Virginia for two rallies, one in Charleston and another in Morgantown. A Public Policy Polling survey released this week shows Mr. Sanders up by 8 percentage points — a stunning turnaround for Mrs. Clinton, who dominated blue-collar voters in West Virginia and other states in her 2008 primary matchup with Barack Obama. In that race, Mrs. Clinton spoke favorably of coal, whose share of American power generation has fallen dramatically under the Obama administration. “The political pressure [to use coal] will remain intense, and I think you have got to admit that coal, of which we have a great and abundant supply in America, is not going away. So how do we best manage the possibility of using clean coal, but having very strict environmental standards? It is not going to do us any good if we substitute one dirty energy source for another,” Mrs. Clinton said in 2007. Now, in the face of a tough primary challenge from Mr. Sanders, who has made climate change and a move away from fossil fuels key issues in his campaign, the former first lady has changed her tune. It’s unclear exactly how the issue will play out in a general election. The Republican presidential nominee — now sure to be billionaire businessman Donald Trump — likely would win the traditionally red states of West Virginia and Kentucky anyway. But the issue also could come into play in battleground coal states such as Pennsylvania and Virginia. Mr. Trump has said he could carry those states with a message that appeals to working-class voters, a point he underlined at a rally Thursday evening.

Agreed..  The Dems are terrified of Trump because they know just how vulnerable Hillary is on a slew of issues from coal, to her failed short stint at the State Dept, to Benghazi, and, of course, the whole email fiasco.  Then, you had her brazen flip-flopping in order to pander to the poor, unemployed, coal miners just adds insult to injury..  People are sick and tired of Hillary’s lies.  As we’ve been saying for over a year here at The Daily Buzz… Hillary is VERY beatable.