Black Moon

Black Moon is coming tonight: What that means

We’ve seen all kinds of interesting phases of the Moon, from “Super blood Moons” to “full worm supermoons” to even the stunning Strawberry Moon. But July 31 will mark a rare occurrence for Earth’s natural satellite — a phenomenon known as a black Moon. The sparse celestial event will be seen in North America, marking the first occurrence since 2016. The rest of the planet will see the black Moon on Aug. 30. Although there is no one single definition of a black Moon, according to Time and Date, it is most commonly used to represent the second new Moon of a month. This rarely happens outside of leap years, as lunar cycles largely take 29 days to complete. But every 32 months or so, there are two full Moons in a month, with the first being known as a blue Moon. Officially, the black Moon will occur at 11:13 p.m. EDT, for the Western Hemisphere according to Space.com. For the Eastern Hemisphere, it will occur after midnight on Aug. 1, but it is not the second new Moon, so it does not count as a black Moon. New Moons are not able to be seen, as they travel “across the sky with the Sun during the day,” according to EarthSky.org. “But the gravitational influence of the new moon and sun combine to physically affect our water planet, which people along the ocean coastlines may notice in the coming days.” Other meanings of a black Moon include a third new Moon in a season of four new Moons; no new Moon in February; and no full Moon in February. Tomorrow’s black Moon will also be a supermoon, which means the new Moon happens at the closest point to Earth in its monthly orbit.

Very cool!  So, again, it’ll be at 11:13pm EDT, or 9:13pm for those of us here in sunny Colorado.    🙂

Black moon set to rise this week in ‘rare’ lunar event – but what is it?

A ‘rare’ black moon is set to rise tonight/ Saturday morning– but what exactly is the lunar event and will we be able to see it? ‘Black Moon Rising’ may sound like the title of an apocalyptic sci-fi film but the astronomical event is unlikely to signal the end of the world, despite the concerns of some doomsayers. From blood moons to strawberry ones and those of the ‘super’ variety, it can be difficult to keep up with all the different names given to the Earth’s natural satellite. The latest causing excitement among skygazers is the so-called black moon, however there are several definitions about what it actually is. Most experts agree the term black moon refers to the second new moon in a calendar month. It shouldn’t be confused with a blue moon, a phenomenon that occurs when there is a second full moon in one calendar month. Joe Rao from space.com explains: “A second full moon in a single calendar month is sometimes called a blue moon. A black moon is supposedly the flip side of a blue moon; the second new moon in a single calendar month.” The last black moon was in March 2014 and the next one after this year’s is expected in 2019. Time and Date explains: “Black Moon is not a well-known term in the astronomy world. In recent years, the term has been made popular by astrologers and followers of the Wiccan religion.” A new moon occurs every 29.5 days. The moon ‘disappears’ from the sky when it is between the earth and the sun with it’s illuminated side facing away from us. The black moon event will take place in the early hours of Saturday morning at 1:11am (GMT) for those in the Western Hemisphere. The black moon will coincide with Halloween for those in the Eastern hemisphere. Unfortunately, you won’t actually be able to see it as the moon will appear invisible. It will just be very dark. Don’t worry, it’s very unlikely the black moon with affect your weekend plans, despite doomsayers predicting it could be the end of humanity.

Indeed..  And yet, all of the crazies will probably be out there..  So, you’ve been warned.  For those that want to try and “see” it anyway, try looking up around 8:11pm ET (6:11pm MDT) this evening. Muhahahahaha!!!       🙂