American Values

MyPillow Making Face Masks for Hospitals During Coronavirus Pandemic

MyPillow, the Minnesota manufacturer of specialty pillows, linens, and other household products, said that it is answering the call for more face masks as the country continues to deal with the global coronavirus pandemic. The company announced Tuesday on Twitter that it is making face masks for hospitals across the country. MyPillow joins a growing list of private companies pitching in to address the shortage of face masks that U.S. healthcare professionals are facing as the number of COVID-19 cases continues to climb. It remains unclear what kind of face mask MyPillow is making. Healthcare professionals are asking for the N95 respirator mask, which are in short supply around the country. The N95 face mask provides a more snug fit than other kinds of surgical masks, providing better protection from airborne pathogens. A MyPillow spokesperson didn’t immediately respond to a request for comment. Companies including 3M and Honeywell are set to manufacture millions of additional N95 respirator masks to protect doctors, nurses and other health care workers who are treating patients with coronavirus. Apple CEO Tim Cook recently said his company will donate millions of face masks to the U.S. and Europe. Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator Peter Gaynor recently told ABC News that n05 masks are in the midst of shipping from the national stockpile, but he didn’t provide a time frame.

Isn’t this great?!?  We’re seeing more and more patriotic companies stepping up and offering to work with the Trump Administration to help fight this Wuhan virus.  We applaud MyPillow CEO and founder Mike Lindell, whom we’ve all seen on his commercials, and his team in Minnesota for doing this.  If you need a pillow, then we encourage you to support MyPillow.  Their products are made right here in America!  Here is their web site:

https://www.mypillow.com/           🙂

Americans Across Country Embrace Patriotism During Coronavirus: ‘Put the Flag Up’

Many Americans across the country are turning to patriotism to find hope during the coronavirus outbreak. Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine (R) called on his constituents to rally around Old Glory during a Friday press conference. “We’ve been attacked by this virus. We have to pull together,” DeWine said, according to WOWK. “Fly that flag every single day.” DeWine told the media about the act of one 7-year-old girl. The governor said he received an email from the girl’s mother which said, “Mr. DeWine, we do not have an American flag to hang outside our home. Today after your news conference, my 7-year-old daughter made this flag for our house in honor of your request.” “I would like to thank 7-year-old Elaina in Radnor, Ohio for the beautiful flag,” DeWine said. Cleveland.com reported there have been “lots of flags” put up around northeast Ohio in response to DeWine’s call. Others have done similar acts. The Buffalo (New York) News reported: ” Joe Riccio is the kind of person who, after a big storm, goes up and down much of his Town of Tonawanda street, snowblowing the sidewalks in front of his neighbors’ homes. So when he heard Erie County Executive Mark Poloncarz on TV the other day urging people to put up an American flag in a show of Covid-19 inspired solidarity, he thought bigger than just his own lawn. Riccio on Thursday planted small flags in the front yards of every house on Kenton Road, a one-block street between Delaware Avenue and Delaware Road that runs into Kenmore West High School.” “I was just trying to show that we’re unified, we’re all in this together,” 70-year-old Riccio told the paper. Boy Scouts in Hamilton, Michigan, placed flags in front of area businesses. “You turn on the TV and people are talking about staying home, things shutting down, people are getting nervous,” scout master David Nevins told Fox 17. “There’s a lot of uncertainty and I think this is a way to make people feel better.”

Agreed!!  And well said, David!  If ever there was a time to put your flag out, it’s now.  And hey, if you don’t have one or the one you have needs replacing, here is a url of a place where you can order a new one:   www.ahouseofflags.com   🙂

 

National Anthem Day — 5 things that might surprise you about the Star-Spangled Banner

It’s rare that a song that is so ubiquitous and connected to American culture (and its corresponding patriotism) would be so steeped in both controversy and intrigue. Most of us are aware of the basic history behind the “Star-Spangled Banner” – our national anthem, which was codified into law on March 3, 1931. Trapped aboard the British ship HMS Tonnant during Great Britain’s attack on Baltimore’s Fort McHenry in September of 1814, Francis Scott Key witnessed the relentless overnight bombardment of the American garrison on September 13-14, 1814. He was so moved by the experience – and so relieved to see “through the night that our flag was still there,” that the struggling poet penned the song’s (originally titled, “Defense of Fort McHenry”) now immortal lyrics. But why did it take over a century to be canonized into law as our national anthem and how did it all happen? Like America’s history itself, the song’s triumphant rise was dependent on both providence and the persistence and talent of many people. Click here to learn five things that might surprise you about the “Star-Spangled Banner.”

Even though the media is focusing on today being “Super Tuesday,” we’re proud to wish you a very Happy National Anthem Day!!  Thanks to Paul J. Batura for that outstanding piece!  Paul is a writer and the author of seven books, including, “GOOD DAY! The Paul Harvey Story.” He can be reached on Twitter @PaulBatura or by email at Paul@PaulBatura.com     🙂

Books: ‘The Pioneers’ is a gentle reminder of the ideals and grit that made America

In a country preoccupied with presidential candidates preaching extreme liberalism and even unabashed socialism comes America’s greatest living historian, David McCullough, with a new and needed book. It’s called “The Pioneers” and the subtitle is its theme: “The heroic story of the settlers who brought the American ideal west.” Nowadays, while students at universities and public schools are learning a history often tainted by political correctness and revisionism, McCullough writes of a young country that might have been stillborn were it not for these pioneers. The founding fathers with whom most are familiar — Washington, Jefferson and Adams — play minor roles in McCullough’s book. Instead, we’re offered characters who are likely unfamiliar to most, such as Manasseh and Ephraim Cutler, Rufus Putnam and Samuel Hildreth. These and many others did the grunt work of nation building. The land on which McCullough mostly focuses was called The Northwest Territory, the initial boundaries of which included the Ohio and Muskinghum Rivers. Its inspiration was The Northwest Ordinance, passed by the Confederation Congress in 1787. The document contained this sentence in Article 3, long since abandoned to our detriment: “Religion, morality, and knowledge, being necessary to good government and the happiness of mankind, schools and the means of education shall forever be encouraged.” McCullough details the enormous sacrifices of men, women and children, who cleared trees, endured harsh weather and conquered lands, expanding the boundaries of the new nation. Yes, Native Americans were displaced in ways that were disgraceful. McCullough notes all that remained were their tribal names, which were assigned to rivers and towns. Among the tribes were the Delaware, Miami, Ottawa, Shawnee and Wyandot. Among the rivers named for them were the Cuyahoga and Chippewa Creek — the creek being a tributary of the Cuyahoga River — as was the Tuscarawas River. It was small consolation to native people who believed land was sacred and not to be owned and who preceded white settlers. As with his other books, McCullough’s writing style makes one feel a part of it all. What astounds is how much New Englanders were willing to sacrifice to explore foreign and hostile land and expand America’s borders. Many died of disease, accidents, bad weather and war with Native American tribes. Living conditions were harsh compared to what they had known in New England, but they persisted. In summing up the contributions of these pioneers, McCullough writes: “(they) had finished their work, each in his or her own way, and no matter the adversities to be faced, propelled as they were by high, worthy purpose. They accomplished what they had set out to do not for money, not for possessions or fame, but to advance the quality and opportunities of life — to propel as best they could the American ideals.” What do we consider to be our American ideals in 2019? The pioneers would likely see them in conflict with their own. Many of our forebears had a strong faith in God and were motivated by what they believed was His will in establishing a nation in which religious freedom and education were paramount. Most believed the Bible was the foundation of a good education. These pioneers also believed America had a purpose, sanctioned by God, which the world might wish to emulate. Slavery was abolished in Ohio by the state’s original constitution (1802), owing much to the anti-slavery efforts of Manasseh and Ephraim Cutler. “The Pioneers” is a rebuke to the entitlement mentality of the 21st century. It should be mandatory reading for all seeking a better understanding of the way we were and how far we have departed from the ideals of those great and heroic men and women of the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Definitely look forward to reading this new book!  I bought a copy last weekend.  Thanks to veteran columnist Cal Thomas for bringing this to our attention.  Cal Thomas is America’s most widely syndicated op-ed columnist. His latest book is “What Works: Common Sense Solutions for a Stronger America“. Readers may email Cal Thomas at tcaeditors@tribune.com.      🙂

Federal Appeals court rules House of Representatives can bar secular prayer from atheist

A D.C. federal appeals court ruled Friday that the House of Representatives does not have to allow a self-described atheist to deliver secular prayers. The Good Friday ruling concerned efforts by Dan Barker, co-president of the Freedom from Religion Foundation, to pray in the House chamber as a guest chaplain — only to be turned down by Father Patrick Conroy, the House chaplain. The court, however, sided with Conroy in determining the House was in its right to require prayers be religious in nature. “We could not order Conroy to allow Barker to deliver a secular invocation because the House permissibly limits the opening prayer to religious prayer. Barker has therefore failed to state a claim for which relief can be granted,” the opinion stated. Article I, Section 5 of the Constitution declares that both the House and Senate “may determine the rules of its proceedings.” Barker had alleged that Conroy rejected him “because he is an atheist.” But the court determined that while that may be true, the House requirement that prayers be religious holds weight. “In other words, even if, as Barker alleges, he was actually excluded simply for being an atheist, he is entitled to none of the relief he seeks,” the opinion said. The tradition of House and Senate prayers goes back to 1789. The House and Senate both begin their legislative days with a religious invocation, frequently delivered by Conroy and his Senate counterpart Barry Black.

Score one for the Constitution..and freedom OF religion; not freedom FROM religion.  Our founders would have been proud of this court ruling.  Glad that sh_t disturbing, self-righteous, rabble-rousing, Christian-hating Dan Barker was smacked down.  Excellent!    🙂

Jay Leno says he likes domestic cars because ‘I’m American’

Jay Leno can, and pretty much does own any car he wants to. The legendary comic has over 150 of them in a collection that runs the gamut from an original Fiat 500 microcar to a McLaren F1 worth over $17 million. You’ll also find plenty of Bugatti, Lamborghini, Jaguar and Mercedes-Benz models parked in the two warehouses he stores them all in. “I’ve got a lot of different cars. I don’t use cars for anything practical at all,” Leno told Fox News Autos. “When my wife and I go out to eat, if there’s not a parking space in front of the restaurant that I can’t see from my table, we are not eating there – thank you very much, okay?” But while he’s often seen driving around L.A. and across the TV screen in foreign classics, when it comes to new cars, he roots for the home team. “I like domestic cars myself because I’m American and I’d like to see the money stay here,” Leno said. So, what are his favorites? Leno said he thinks the high-performance Ford F-150 Raptor is “terrific.” “It’s a really, really good vehicle – I like that a lot.” He’s also such a fan of the Ford GT supercar that he was one of the first people to plunk down $450,000 to buy one. But when it comes to bargain sports cars, he says the Chevrolet Corvette is the world’s best. “You get Lamborghini performance at Chevrolet prices. I mean, the Corvette [ZR1] has 755 horsepower for a third of the price you’d get for a Ferrari or a Lamborghini, and since it’s a Chevy – you can fix it with a hammer and BOOM.” Leno knows what he’s talking about, because he works on his cars himself. Including the 1955 Buick Roadmaster he bought in 1972 for $350 when he moved to California and that he still owns today.

🙂

 

PHOTOS: Melania Trump Shines Bright Assembling Red Cross Care Packages for American Troops

First Lady Melania Trump shined bright on Tuesday as she assembled care packages with the Red Cross for American troops and service members stationed overseas. Mrs. Trump embraced the families of American troops in a patriotic ensemble of entirely red, white, and blue — how appropriate! Mrs. Trump’s striped cashmere sweater is by Madeleine Thompson, matching the red stripe of the garment with her red skinny jeans and flats. In a speech at the Red Cross event, Mrs. Trump thanked the U.S. military for their service and their families for the sacrifices they have made. “I’m very thankful for the men and women in uniform who sacrifice daily to protect not only the American people, but our freedoms and way of life,” Mrs. Trump said. “Our prayers remain with all those serving overseas and the families who wait for them to come home.”

Please click on the text above to see photos and videos from yesterday’s event.  Major kudos to our First Lady for her efforts here.  She gets it!  Outstanding!!!      🙂