Liberal Democrats ignore persecution of Christians outside the U.S.

Advocates who work to protect persecuted groups say there is a “blind spot” in the West concerning the plight faced by Christians around the world — a shortsightedness evident in the overwhelmingly negative reaction to President Trump’s executive order granting preferred refugee status to persecuted religious minorities. From the Coptics in Egypt and the “house churches” in China to the “subversives” in North Korea and the “apostates” in Pakistan, Christians are under fire on the international stage. Paul Coleman, deputy director of the Alliance Defending Freedom International, said the international persecution of Christians is unrivaled. “No person or group should live in fear of being killed, tortured or oppressed because of their religious beliefs,” Mr. Coleman said in a statement. “By all accounts Christians are the most persecuted group on the planet.” Each month, about 322 Christians are killed, 214 churches or Christian properties are destroyed, and 772 acts of violence are carried out on Christians because of their faith, according to Open Doors, a nonprofit group that helps persecuted Christians. Andrew Doran, vice president of In Defense of Christians, said their cries for help often fall on deaf ears in Europe and the United States because Christianity is the dominant faith in an increasingly secular culture. Mr. Doran pointed to the Obama administration’s lethargic response to the Islamic State’s Christian genocide, saying people who see Christians as domestic enemies have trouble shifting gears when atrocities are committed against the faith group on the global stage. “Christians in the West have been somehow identified as the oppressor class, and that view seems to be extended to Christians in the Middle East,” he said. “But the fact is that couldn’t be further from the truth.” Mr. Doran said that “blind spot” was evident in the reaction to Mr. Trump’s executive order, which temporarily suspended refugee flows until proper security measures could be implemented, but made exceptions for religious minorities who are persecuted. “Whether someone is Muslim, Yazidi, Jewish, Christian or atheist, they should be given priority if they’re facing persecution, and certainly that would be so where there’s a finding of genocide,” Mr. Doran said.

Unfortunately, we cannot afford to be the world’s shelter.  That said, there is a grotesquely disproportionate number of refugees that are Muslim vs those that are Christian that come from countries like Syria (like several thousand to 1).  So, going forward, we SHOULD take that issue (i.e.religion) into consideration when trying to determine whom we allow into our country for religious person reasons.  Clearly the Obama administration made a targeted/concerted effort to import Muslims from the very places we do NOT want to be recruiting persons from (i.e. northern Africa and the Middle East) as they are the hotbeds for global terrorism.  So, why not reverse that course, and make persecuted Christians those who we give extra consideration for?  Makes sense to me!  Just sayin…

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